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Starbucks is unveiling a new drink that cashes in on fall's hottest trend — and it could be bigger than the Pumpkin Spice Latte (SBUX)

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STARBUCKS cups

There's a new Pumpkin Spice Latte in town. 

On Thursday, Starbucks announced that it would debut the new Maple Pecan Latte on Friday to celebrate the first day of fall. 

The beverage is "inspired by classic fall flavors," according to Starbucks, and it will feature notes of maple syrup, pecan, and brown sugar. 

Maple has been on the rise this fall. Dunkin' Donuts launched Maple Pecan-flavored coffee in August. Overall, Technomic data indicates maple flavoring's presence is up roughly 85% in nonalcoholic beverages between the second quarter of 2016 and the second quarter of 2017, MarketWatch reported.

The beverage launch is being accompanied by the debut of Starbucks' new fall cups. While Starbucks' red winter cups have become an iconic — and at times controversial — sign of the holiday season, recently the coffee chain has attempted to provide seasonal cups for different parts of the calendar. 

The fall cups look pretty similar to the chain's spring cups, but with warmer, more autumnal colors compared to the March cups' springy pastels.

The reaction to the spring cups was muted compared to the anticipation and occasional backlash to winter's red cups, though some felt the white circles looked a little bit too much like Twitter's default profile picture.  

SEE ALSO: Starbucks still has a 'basic' image problem — and one factor could make it even worse this PSL season

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NOW WATCH: How airplanes fly those giant banner ads — it's more dangerous than you think

Here are all the changes Amazon is making to Whole Foods (AMZN)

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Whole Foods

Whole Foods is swiftly transforming under Amazon's control. 

Amazon's $13.7 billion acquisition of Whole Foods formally went through in August.

The changes began immediately, from cutting costs to internal restructuring. 

Following the acquisition, Amazon is trying "to operate more like a traditional market," the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday. 

Here's what changes have been revealed so far — and how they'll affect Whole Foods shoppers. 

SEE ALSO: I visited Whole Foods on the day it was acquired by Amazon — and it's clear it'll never be the same

Whole Foods has already cut prices.

The day the acquisition went through, prices of many Whole Foods staples immediately dropped. Some price tags decreased by up to 40%. 

An identical basket of items from a Whole Foods location in Brooklyn went from $97.76 pre-acquisition to $75.85 post-acquisition. 



The grocery stores are now selling Amazon Echos and Echo Dots.

According to Amazon, the popular voice-controlled speaker system will be available at select Whole Foods locations. A Brooklyn location advertised the Amazon Echo as the "pick of the season" the day the acquisition completed. 



Amazon Prime members will get special discounts.

Whole Foods announced that Amazon Prime will replace Whole Foods' current loyalty program. 



See the rest of the story at Business Insider

You can buy a third of a Hawaiian island for $260 million — but there's a catch

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Papohako looking towards Kaiaka Rock

One-third of the island of Molokai — the fifth-largest island in Hawaii — is up for sale for $260 million.

The property, called Molokai Ranch, encompasses 55,575 acres of the island. Mark Zuckerberg had reportedly considered purchasing it back in 2015, before he ultimately settled on a 750-acre property on the North Shore of Kauai.

The land doesn't come without restrictions, however. Its current owner, investment holding company GL Ltd., has run into numerous issues with the island's 7,000 locals while attempting to build various projects there since the 1990s, reports Bloomberg. Many objected to what they saw as overdevelopment of their homeland, and in response, GL shut down the ranch in 2008. 

"Residents of Molokai don't like to be bullied," Alan Arakawa, the mayor of the city and county of Maui, said.

Ultimately, GL said it hopes the buyer has a "new vision" for the property. Scott Carvill and Vicki Yu of Carvill Sotheby's International Realty have the listingSee its stunning coastline and land, below.

SEE ALSO: These are 8 of the top trending destinations right now, according to travel experts

Whoever buys the ranch, which takes up roughly 35% of the island, will be one of the top five private landowners in the state.



In the 1800s, part of the land was occupied by the Hawaiian royal family.

Source: Bloomberg



The island has a history of agriculture and an operating cattle business.



See the rest of the story at Business Insider

Million-dollar ZIP codes are on the rise — and it could spell trouble for America's homeownership rate

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San Jose California

The US housing market has recovered from the 2008 sub-prime mortgage crisis by at least one metric.

Today, more than one in 25 ZIP codes in America could be called a "million-dollar ZIP." That's 172 more than at the housing-market peak in 2007.

Zillow defines million-dollar ZIPs as areas where at least 10% of the homes are worth $1 million or more.

"It's a sign of the times that over half the housing stock in the US has regained value since the housing bust, and many markets are more expensive than they've ever been," Zillow's chief economist Svenja Gudell told Business Insider.

Home prices have surged across the country in response to stagnant housing supply. Coupled with slow wage growth, homeownership is no longer within reach for many Americans, especially millennials. As of July, the national homeownership rate was just under 64%, and even lower in many coastal markets, where million-dollar ZIPs abound.

"It shows how tough it is to break into the market as a buyer. Even though mortgage rates are so low, the down payment on a $1 million home is hard to save for," Gudell said. "Millennials are trying to break into these homeownership markets because the jobs are there, and they're having a hard time."

The average home value in a million-dollar ZIP was $900,584 in May, nearly 4.5 times the national home value of $200,400.

Though high prices are a sign of recovery, movement hasn't been consistently skyward. In 2014, the total number of million-dollar ZIPs in the US dipped to 958, according to Zillow, about 0.5% fewer than pre-recession era.

But by May of 2017, that number had risen to 1,280, equal to 4.35% of all US ZIP codes. The West Coast accounted for nearly one-third of that growth, minting new million-dollar ZIPs in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, San Jose, Los Angeles, and San Diego.

Another 26% of new million-dollar ZIPs since 2014 came from New York, Boston, Miami, and Washington, DC.

San Francisco and San Jose metro areas lead the nation, with 74% and 77%, respectively, of all ZIP codes considered million-dollar areas. Seattle experienced remarkable growth as well, doubling its million-dollar ZIP count since 2007 to 38 — 24% of the metro area's total ZIPs.

Coastal housing markets have always been more expensive than markets in interior states, but with increasing millennial populations in these cities, many of whom are looking to settle down, prices are being driven even higher.

"A million-dollar home is no entry level home," Gudell said. "Even for a well-off millennial, you're going to have a hard time scraping together a down payment for that home and a lot of times you're not getting a conventional mortgage, you're getting a jumbo mortgage."

Ultimately, the surge in million-dollar ZIPs is a likely contributor to today's record low homeownership rates among millennials, along with increased student debt burdens, and choosing to live with family. As long as home prices continue to rise in popular markets, pricing out young people, Gudell said, renter populations — and rents — will increase, too.

SEE ALSO: Here's how much it costs each month to own a home in the 15 largest US metros

DON'T MISS: The salary you need to earn to buy a home right now in 23 of the most expensive US housing markets

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THE TESLA ROAD TRIP — The last leg of the journey is the hardest as we race against time to avoid running out of battery power

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Video producers Graham and Will try to wrap up an epic road trip from San Francisco to NYC.

In the last episode of a seven part series, the crew runs in to a real problem outside Cleveland. And it's all because of poor planning on their part. The Model X navigation system says they will only have 2% battery power left by the time they get to the next Supercharger station. Then that estimate gets downgraded to 1% ... will they make it to New York City?

Click here to watch the entire series.

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THE TESLA ROAD TRIP — We check out the views atop Chicago's Willis Tower and, back on the ground, 'summon' the Model X to us

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Video producers Graham and Will are on an epic road trip from San Francisco to New York City.

In episode 6 of a seven part series, the duo wakes up in Chicago and head up to the top of the Willis Tower. Heading east in the Model X, they test the "Summon" feature and watch the car set off on its own. Plus, in the interest of science, Graham debunks his own personal myth about charging in the rain.

Day 7: 469 miles

WATCH: Things get stressful as the Model X hits 1% battery power.

Click here to watch the entire series.

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THE TESLA ROAD TRIP — We show off the Falcon Wing doors on the Model X and eat lunch at Warren Buffett's favorite steakhouse

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Video producers Graham and Will are on an epic road trip from San Francisco to New York City.

In episode 5 of a seven part series, they drive by Warren Buffett's house to see if he's around. Then set off to eat lunch like a billionaire at Gorat's Steakhouse - where Buffett has his own private dining room. Also, a look inside the Model X "frunk" - and they show off the Falcon Wing doors

Day 6: 344 miles

WATCH: "I summon you!" - the car drives itself across a parking lot.

Day 7: 469 miles

WATCH: Things get stressful as the Model X hits 1% battery power.


CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE ENTIRE SERIES.

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THE TESLA ROAD TRIP — Things get tense as we argue about directions, hair loss, driving, supercharger stations, and naps

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Video producers Graham and Will are on an epic road trip from San Francisco to New York City.

In episode 4 of a seven part series, Graham and Will begin to drive each other crazy. It starts right away, with an argument at the first Tesla Supercharger stop of the day. They have to separate briefly at their second stop. As things get more and more tense, Graham settles in for a long nap while Will pushes forward to Omaha and Warren Buffett's house.

Day 5: 471 miles

WATCH: A perfect pit stop at Warren Buffett's favorite steakhouse in Omaha.

Day 6: 344 miles

WATCH: "I summon you!" - the car drives itself across a parking lot.

Day 7: 469 miles

WATCH: Things get stressful as the Model X hits 1% battery power.


CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE ENTIRE SERIES.

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THE TESLA ROAD TRIP — We stop at one of the most scenic Supercharger stations out West and discover the cool panoramic windshield on the Model X

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Video producers Graham and Will are on an epic road trip from San Francisco to New York City.

In episode 3 of a seven part series, they head for the Rocky Mountains and hit one of the most scenic Supercharger stations in America. Plus, they start to test the limits of the Tesla Model X and see what makes the panoramic windshield so special. Bonus: Graham thinks he sees a double rainbow.

Day 4: 537 miles

WATCH: Things get tense as Will tells Graham: "I don't know if you're going bald ... maybe."

Day 5: 471 miles

WATCH: A perfect pit stop at Warren Buffett's favorite steakhouse in Omaha.

Day 6: 344 miles

WATCH: "I summon you!" - the car drives itself across a parking lot.

Day 7: 469 miles

WATCH: Things get stressful as the Model X hits 1% battery power.


CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE ENTIRE SERIES.

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THE TESLA ROAD TRIP — We try to see the Grand Canyon but there's not a Supercharger station in sight

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Video producers Graham and Will are on an epic road trip from San Francisco to New York City.

In episode 2 of a seven part series, they try to stop by the Grand Canyon but soon discover there are no Tesla Supercharger stations nearby. Salt Lake City is the goal by the end of the day. Plus Graham has an accident... with coffee. 

Day 3: 592 miles

WATCH: The views overwhelm them as they take in the most beautiful trip across the Rocky Mountains.

Day 4: 537 miles

WATCH: Things get tense as Will tells Graham: "I don't know if you're going bald ... maybe."

Day 5: 471 miles

WATCH: A perfect pit stop at Warren Buffett's favorite steakhouse in Omaha.

Day 6: 344 miles

WATCH: "I summon you!" - the car drives itself across a parking lot.

Day 7: 469 miles

WATCH: Things get stressful as the Model X hits 1% battery power.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE ENTIRE SERIES.

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Walmart heiress Alice Walton is the richest woman in the world (WMT)

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Alice Walton (Jim out of focus)

Walmart heiress Alice Walton is once again the richest woman in the world. 

With the death of the French heiress of cosmetics giant L'Oreal Liliane Bettencourt, Walton has gone from the second richest to the richest woman on the planet.

Prior to her death, Bettencourt was the 15th richest person in the world, while Walton was No. 19.

With an estimated net worth of $38.4 billion, Walton is a member of one of the richest families in the world. 

Alice, along with older brothers Jim and Rob — who also graced the list, produced with Wealth-Xa company that conducts research on the superwealthy— have a combined net worth of $101.5 billion, thanks primarily to their stake in retail giant Walmart.

Unlike her brothers, 66-year-old Walton never took an active role in running the retail empire her father started in 1962, though she's still managed to become the target of pushback from minimum-wage Walmart employees who view her highfalutin lifestyle as insensitive and ignorant to the plight of many workers.

Alice Walton

Instead of spending time at Walmart, Walton became a patron of the arts at a young age. When she was just 10 years old, Walton saved up her allowance to buy a reproduction of Picasso's "Blue Nude," she told The New Yorker.

"Collecting has been such a joy, and such an important part of my life in terms of seeing art, and loving it,” she said.

She began buying watercolor pieces in the 1970s and adorning the walls of her Rocking W Ranch with them. From there she moved on to more serious original works, particularly those by classic American artists; her immense personal collection now includes pieces from Andy Warhol, Norman Rockwell, and Georgia O'Keefe, among others.

crystal bridges museum arkansas

In 2011, she opened the $50 million Crystal Bridges Museum in Arkansas to house her $500 million collection. When it opened, Crystal Bridges already had four times the endowment of the famous Whitney Museum in New York.

Before delving into the art realm, Walton made a brief career as an equity analyst and even founded her own investment bank, Llama Company, in 1988. The company closed about 10 years later, shortly after Walton was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol (not for the first time).

Twice divorced with no children, Walton is also a lover of horses, which she breeds at Rocking W Ranch, located in Texas, and rides competitively. The 1,456-acre ranch, however, is currently for sale for nearly $20 million.

Walton is one of just four women to make our list of the 50 richest people on earth — and each inherited their fortune. The next wealthiest woman is 93-year-old Liliane Bettencourt, the French heiress to the L'Oreal fortune, with a net worth of $29 billion.  

Melissa Stanger contributed reporting to this piece. 

SEE ALSO: The 50 richest people on earth

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NOW WATCH: Here’s where the 20 richest people in America live

THE TESLA ROAD TRIP — Watch as things get off to a rocky start and we have to call for help

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Video producers Graham and Will set off on an epic road trip from San Francisco to New York City.

In episode 1 of a seven-part series, they pick up a new Tesla Model X from the showroom in San Francisco and begin the journey to Las Vegas. Graham checks out the Autopilot feature despite his fears. They also get stuck at their first Supercharger station and have to call Tesla for help. Plus, they test out the acceleration on the open highway

Day 2: 421 miles

WATCH: Plans for a Grand Canyon tour go south quickly.

Day 3: 592 miles

WATCH: The views overwhelm them as they take in the most beautiful trip across the Rocky Mountains.

Day 4: 537 miles

WATCH: Things get tense as Will tells Graham: "I don't know if you're going bald ... maybe."

Day 5: 471 miles

WATCH: A perfect pit stop at Warren Buffett's favorite steakhouse in Omaha.

Day 6: 344 miles

WATCH: "I summon you!" - the car drives itself across a parking lot.

Day 7: 469 miles

WATCH: Things get stressful as the Model X hits 1% battery power.


CLICK HERE TO BINGE-WATCH THE WHOLE SERIES.

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Why 'the most interesting man in the world' ditched beer for tequila

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Jonathan Goldsmith

The man known across the globe as "the most interesting man in the world" is back in the spotlight with a new venture, but this time, he's traded in his Dos Equis beer for something a little stronger: tequila.

Jonathan Goldsmith, a Bronx native and a lifelong actor, has played more than 400 roles across television, film, and theater, but that's probably not how you recognize him. For 10 years, he was the face of a famous Dos Equis campaign that dubbed him "the most interesting man in the world."

Last year, at the conclusion of Goldsmith's contract with Dos Equis, the beer company decided that it wanted to go with someone younger to keep the brand fresh. This left the world's most interesting man in a position he hadn't been in for over a decade — looking for work.

The popularity of the Dos Equis campaign was so great, he figured surely someone would want to exploit it.

He recently told Business Insider about an offer he received from another beer company a few years into his Dos Equis gig.

He said: "They told me, 'The day that campaign ends, we'll give you $1 million for one day's work. Just look into the camera holding our beer and say: 'I once made a mistake.''"

That opportunity never came to be, but an even better one was right on his doorstep.

Goldsmith said he has always enjoyed a cocktail or two along with a cigar most nights. His preferred cocktail has always been scotch.

But after he was introduced to Master Sommelier Richard Betts, the ninth person to pass the master sommelier test on the first try, Goldsmith found his new preferred spirit: tequila.

Betts walked Goldsmith through the process of how his tequila, Astral Tequila, is produced. Goldsmith was fascinated by the care that went into making this tequila, calling it "almost romantic." It's made the old-fashioned way and takes five to 10 times longer to make than other tequilas.

Goldsmith decided to join the company as a spokesperson. Astral Tequila is owned by New York-based spirits company Davos Brands

astral tequila

The process wasn't the only aspect of Astral that intrigued Goldsmith. He also loved the taste, claiming it has an earthy feel that reminds him of scotch. Science probably will never be able to back up his claim, but he swears that he's never gotten a hangover from Astral.

He loves the tequila so much that he didn't want to just get involved by becoming the spokesman — he also took an equity stake in the company.

There's plenty more to the most interesting man in the world, which can be found in his book, "Stay Interesting: I Don't Always Tell Stories About My Life, But When I Do They're True and Amazing."

SEE ALSO: Pepsi CEO reveals her surprising response to controversial Kendall Jenner ad

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NOW WATCH: This is what 'The Most Interesting Man in the World' is really like

Reports are swirling that a Wall Street CEO might resign as he's forced to deny that he bought a $13 million mansion for an executive

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mark walter

Guggenheim Partners, a $290 billion investment firm with ties to the family behind New York's Guggenheim museum, is being rocked by a leadership crisis that's now broken into the city's tabloids. 

In the last 24 hours the company has refuted multiple reports that CEO Mark Walter will step down, its chief investment officer has appeared on CNBC and claimed there's "no tumult" at the company, and Guggenheim has also had to deny reports on a real-estate blog and in the New York Post that Walter bought a California mansion for a younger female executive at the company. 

The company's CIO, Scott Minerd — who is credited with growing the firm's assets to nearly $300 billion— did acknowledge that the firm faces an SEC investigation. He didn't elaborate, but Reuters has reported that the investigation is related to an investment in a London-listed business with banking investments in Africa. 

Walter, who owns the Los Angeles Dodgers and helped found Guggenheim, "has no present intent to relinquish his position as CEO," a spokesperson for Guggenheim told Business Insider in an email. The denials came after Bloomberg News reported that the 57-year-old billionaire might step away from day-to-day management of the firm following reports of tumult among executives. The Financial Times and Reuters also published similar reports. 

A key issue, according to the Financial Times, was the promotion of 
Alexandra Court to global head of institutional distribution a year ago. Her promotion coincided with the firing of 22 members of the executive team, the newspaper reported.  

Citing "scores of employees and clients," the paper said the move was a "lightning rod for many staff members as her promotion led to radical changes to the group’s asset management unit that alarmed several clients and contributed to the departure of several senior managers."

It triggered tension between Walter and Minerd, the paper said. Both men have denied this.

alexandra court guggenheim

According to Court's LinkedIn profile, she's been at Guggenheim for 7 years. Fellow employees told The Financial Times they were upset she didn't have a US securities license. She's currently on a "sabbatical" from the firm, the Post reported.

Court's $13.5 million Pacific Palisades home is also part of the controversy. Records show it was acquired by the same entity as the one that handled the purchase of Walter's $85 million home, real estate blog Yolanda's Little Black Book reported.

"With regard to the blog item about a Pacific Palisades house, Mark Walter does not own the home in Pacific Palisades that is mentioned in the blog nor did he buy it for Ms. Court," Guggenheim told Business Insider. 

The company denies Walter, who is married, and Court have a relationship beyond business. 

alexandra court mansion

 Here's a memo that Guggenheim's board of directors sent to employees on Sept. 20 in support of Walter: 

"To: All Employees

From: Guggenheim Partners Board of Directors

Date: September 20, 2017

You may have read various recent accounts in the business press regarding Guggenheim and its senior management. In spite of our representatives telling the press what we summarize below, stories have been published that are, simply, wrong. We issue this -- a unanimous statement of Guggenheim's Board -- to set the record straight.

  1. Mark Walter, CEO and Founder of Guggenheim Partners has the full and unequivocal support of the entire Board, each and every one of its members.
  1. Every Board Member affirms full and complete support of Mark Walter as CEO and full and complete support of Scott Minerd as well as the entire senior executive leadership of Guggenheim.
  1. The firm is thriving, growing, stable and strong.

We trust that this clear and concise communication ends the confusion and misinformation that has characterized recent press coverage of our firm."

SEE ALSO: The cost difference between Melania Trump's and Michelle Obama's outfits reveals the truth about America's criticisms of them

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NOW WATCH: A massive Hamptons estate that once belonged to the Ford family is on the market for a potentially record-breaking $175 million

There are now Spanx for arms — here's why it's a brilliant idea

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arm tights

Spanx is launching tights for your arms. 

The shapewear company will begin selling "Arm Tights" on September 25, Vogue reports. Basically, the arm tights do what traditional Spanx do — smush any excess fat together, suction it in, and smooth it out — but for your arms instead of your thighs. 

The semi-sheer crop top "tights" are already featured on Spanx's website, priced from $30 to $34. 

To be completely honest, we were baffled by this invention. Despite the Vogue reporter's assurance that the arm tights were comfortable, we had to ask: Who would want to turn two more appendages into tightly packed sausages, enveloped in a semi-see-through shirt this fall? 

Apparently, a lot of people do. 

A quick search on Twitter to gauge the general reaction to arm tights didn't turn up much regarding the new product. However, before the new product was announced, there were seemingly endless inquiries as to whether there were Spanx made for arms. 

Clearly, we underestimated how many people want to shrink-wrap their entire body with Spanx.

Spanx obviously knew more than we did when it filed a patent for "arm tights" on April 20, 2017. 

Spanx founder Sara Blakely has made a fortune by giving women what they want: a comfortable way to address one of their biggest bodily insecurities. Now, it looks like Spanx is targeting another one. 

SEE ALSO: Anthropologie was forced to cancel orders after selling $8,000 couches for free online

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NOW WATCH: Sears is closing even more Kmart stores — see if yours is on the list

There's one type of carb that nutritionists say you should be eating every day

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toast avocado tomato sandwich

Not all carbs are created equal.

A growing body of evidence suggests that whole grains are a key component of a healthy diet. As opposed to their refined cousins, whole grains are an excellent source of fiber (which is key for healthy digestion), protein (which helps fill you up and power your muscles), and several key vitamins and minerals.

In fact, the plant-based diet, which has been increasingly championed by nutritionists and dietitians as the best for your brain and body, has whole grains as one if its cornerstones.

Whole grains vs. 'stripped carbs'

The key difference between whole grains and processed carbohydrates — like white rice and the wheat in white bread — is that the latter has had its nutritious, fiber-rich outer shells, such as the germ and bran, stripped out in a factory. The end result is soft bread, smooth rice, and sweet cereal that gets processed by the body almost as quickly as it was ingested.

bi_graphics_whole_grain

But while refined carbs may taste delicious, experts agree that they don't belong in a healthy diet. Whereas their whole-grain counterparts get digested slowly and fill you up for hours, refined carbs are processed quickly by the body and rapidly turned into sugar.

This is why those ingredients can contribute to weight gain, according to Roxanne B. Sukol, a preventive medicine specialist and the medical director of the Cleveland Clinic's Wellness Enterprise. In the book "Grocery: The Buying and Selling of Food in America," Sukol told author and chef Michael Ruhlman that people should think of things like white rice and white bread simply as "stripped carbs."

Why plant-based diets are good for the body

healthy eatingCara Anselmo, a nutritionist and dietitian at New York's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, told Business Insider that she frequently advises her clients to ramp up their intake of plant-based foods like whole grains and cut back on red meat and refined carbohydrates like white bread.

"It's definitely easiest to overdo it with drinks, refined carbs, foods that have added sugar or are highly processed — those are things that we just tend to keep going," Anselmo said.

To keep your energy levels up and help you feel healthy in the long term, your diet needs to feed more than your stomach, she said. It has to satiate your muscles, which crave protein; your digestive system, which runs best with fiber; and your tissues and bones, which work optimally when they're getting vitamins from food.

A plant-based diet's combination of whole grains, fruits, vegetables, proteins, and fats accomplishes that goal, Nichola Whitehead, a registered dietitian with a private practice in the UK, told Business Insider.

"You need to have a balanced meal — things like whole grains, fiber, and vegetables — in order to sustain your blood sugar. Empty calories [like white bread or white rice] give a temporary fix," she said.

SEE ALSO: There's even more evidence that one type of diet is the best for your body and brain

DON'T MISS: A doctor has a simple name for the type of food she says is driving the obesity epidemic

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NOW WATCH: Here’s how the American diet has changed in the last 52 years

How to get a refund for trips disrupted by hurricane season

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hurricane maria puerto rico

Puerto Rico is still reeling from the devastation brought by Hurricane Maria.

The storm slammed into Puerto Rico at 6:15 a.m. on Wednesday as the third-strongest hurricane to ever hit the US, and it caused widespread destruction. 

Governor Ricardo Rosselló told CNN that the island could be without power for four to six months due to damage from the storm.

So what can you do if you had booked a trip to Puerto Rico in the near future? If you don't have trip insurance, there isn't much you can do.

If you do have insurance, the trip could qualify under the "unforeseen circumstances" part of the policy, according to Stan Sandberg, cofounder of TravelInsurance.com.

"One of the main reasons why people cancel a trip and file a claim with travel insurance is for just what we witnessed," Sandberg said. "The events that came out of [this year's] hurricanes would constitute covered reasons, and one holding a policy would be able to cancel and get their money back."

Insurance policies typically will not provide coverage against a storm that has been named by the time of purchase, however, so some forethought is required. You would have to purchase general coverage before the storm was named. Sandberg recommends staying informed of weather patterns during risky periods like the Atlantic hurricane season.

2017 was predicted to be a particularly bad hurricane season, so travel insurance would have been a good bet. There is no general rule that a hotel, airline, or tour agency must refund you in the case of a hurricane. However, those in doubt should contact the company first to see if a refund or a waiver is avaiable.

"Many travel suppliers, including airlines and hotels, are waiving change fees to allow rescheduling without penalty," Daniel Durazo, director of communications at Allianz Global Assistance USA, said.

SEE ALSO: Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico and cut power to the entire island — here's what it looks like on the ground

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NOW WATCH: Now that Apple has unveiled iPhone X, should you dump the stock?

An exercise physiologist reveals the workout equipment you should always avoid in the gym, and why

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Heather Milton, exercise physiologist at NYU Langone Health, reveals the workout equipment you should always avoid in the gym, and why. Following is a transcript of the video.

Heather Milton: So when you're in the gym and you are looking for the best exercise equipment to use to maximize whatever your fitness goals are, there are a few that I would recommend staying away from.

One of them is if you are looking for general strength and functional strength as well as if you are looking to lose weight, I would suggest staying away from any of the machines that do one single-joint movement. 

And those are the things like leg extensions where you are sitting and you are just extending your leg or if you are doing just the calf raise meaning that you are just going up onto your toes and pushing up.

Exercises like that — bicep curls and tricep extensions are single-joint, single-muscles, so they are not really giving you as much benefit as trying to do what we call compound movements, which are using multiple joints at the same time, maximizing the amount of muscles active during the exercise like doing a chest press or a row.

Depending on the type of goal that you have, doing a rower, or an ergonometer, or stair stepper, all those machines are great for giving our cardiovascular benefit, as well as for activating a lot of muscles at once.

So they're all good for maintaining cardiovascular fitness and reducing your risk for health complications as well as improving your overall aerobic fitness. 

They're not necessarily the best for building muscular strength, so when it comes to muscular strength, you do want to focus on exercises that you're able to do only about 8 to 12 repetitions of at a time before you fatigue.

And giving good rest of 30 to 60 seconds between each set of those exercises will give you the most stimulus to improve your muscular strength.

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Facebook is dropping $35 million to lease a beautiful, earthquake-resistant skyscraper in San Francisco — take a look inside

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181 Fremont residential tower building renderings

Thousands of Facebook employees are about to experience a much more pleasant commute.

The social media giant has signed a lease at 181 Fremont, a mixed-use skyscraper that will be the tallest residential building on the West Coast once it's completed later this year. The tower rises 70 stories over San Francisco's Financial District and will house 2,000 to 3,000 Facebook and Instagram employees across 33 floors, a spokesperson for Facebook told Business Insider.

The 436,000-square-foot office space will be Facebook's first outpost in San Francisco. The company currently shuttles thousands of employees from the city to its headquarters in Menlo Park, which is located about 35 miles south. The jaunt can take up to two hours in traffic.

The blockbuster deal, which was first reported by the San Francisco Business Times, marks San Francisco's largest office lease in three years. The Business Times didn't report the duration of the lease, but said the asking rent was "around $80 per square foot," which totals to $35 million for the entire space. Facebook declined to confirm details of the lease.

Facebook employees will share the stunning new skyscraper with some well-heeled residential tenants — the upper floors hold 67 luxury condos.

These renderings of 181 Fremont give us a glimpse inside Facebook's new building.

SEE ALSO: Here are all the multimillion-dollar condos for sale in San Francisco's leaning, sinking skyscraper

Facebook's first outpost in San Francisco is one of the most lavish towers in the city.

Designer Orlando Diaz-Azcuy and architectural firm Heller Manus Architects set out to make 181 Fremont the epitome of luxury. Developers of the $665 million tower spared no expense.

"The vision for 181 Fremont is not simply to raise the bar for luxury living in San Francisco, but to set an entirely new one," a brochure for interested residential buyers said.



It rises 70 stories over the Financial District and neighbors the new Salesforce Tower.



The developers of 181 Fremont describe the building as an "engineering marvel." An aluminum-based exoskeleton twists around the building to provide added support.

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The story of a North Korean amputee's 6,000-mile escape on crutches

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Ji Seong-ho sat down to talk with Business Insider about his 6,000 mile journey from North Korea after his inspiring speech at the Oslo Freedom Forum. Following is a transcript of the video.

Since coming to South Korea, I've been living with a prosthetic arm and leg. Originally, I was missing a part of my arm and leg and it was very difficult living in North Korea with such a disability because I didn't get any food or support from the government.

I think maybe they just wanted me to die. So I crossed the border to China and begged for food but was arrested when I returned. They confiscated everything and tortured me and heard them say things like, "cripples like you should just die." So I decided that I should escape.

In 2006, I defected from North Korea, crossed the Duman River and travelled through China, Laos, Myanmar, and Thailand for 10,000 km (6,200 miles) on nothing but crutches. I really think it was a miracle. I really think God helped me. 

During the journey, I was so tired that I collapsed in the jungle with no one around me. Everyone who was traveling with me had abandoned me because they couldn't take care of me. I remember lying down in that jungle, crying and I wanted to survive so that I could later help those who are in my situation.

Thankfully, I was able to get help from some people and I was able to cross the border. 

Just as my life is important, everyone's life is important. When you are arrested while defecting, you get sent back to get publicly executed in North Korea or sent to a labor camp.

So a lot of effort goes into getting one person across the border. Right now, it costs about $2,000 for one person to defect from North Korea. It pays for food and everything else needed to make the trip and it costs that much because they aren't taking a plane but crossing multiple countries illegally.

About 90% of the cost is funded by South Koreans and we were able to save 260 people so far. There are more people who want to defect than we can help with the money we have funded so sometimes we are forced to choose among them based on who is in a more dire situation.

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