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This champagne shooter will make you the hit of the party

The top 15 American cities for young college grads

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National Mall Washington DC

As the year winds down for college seniors around the US, the next important decision many will make is where they should move after graduation.

A ranking of the best major metropolitan areas from the American Institute for Economic Research (AIER) may help students having trouble making the call.

AIER calculated its list using nine economic, demographic, and quality-of-life factors. AIER defines major metropolitan cities as having over 2.5 million residents.

The report states that the most important factor in determining where recent graduates should relocate is the prevalence of other young recent grads.

“The young and well-educated are moving to places where they’ll find a big contingent of the population that share these characteristics,” Amanda Knarr, program coordinator at AIER, said in a press release. “Civic leaders seeking to attract college-educated millennials and the businesses that employ them will want to emphasize their demographic profile.”

Aside from the overall ranking, we included cities' individual scores for rent, earnings, and bars and restaurants as well.

Scroll through to find out the 15 best American cities for young college grads.

15. Los Angeles, California

#10 Rent

#10 Earnings

#4 Bars and Restaurants

 



14. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

#6 Rent

#14 Earnings

#13 Bars and Restaurants



13. Houston, Texas

#4 Rent

#4 Earnings

#10 Bars and Restaurants



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A 'drone ballet' in Japan is the world's coolest music and light show

How luxury shoppers are changing the face of retail

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bii luxury

Luxury shoppers are highly coveted customers for brands and retailers. The top 10% of US household earners (those taking home $120,000 or more annually) account for approximately half of all consumer expenditures.

This demographic’s growing preference for online shopping is changing the face of luxury retail, and it has significant implications for how brands target luxury consumers.

In a new report from BI Intelligence, we profile the luxury shopper and take a close look at the spending habits and preferences of high-income earners — including how and where they shop.

 

Here are some of the key takeaways:

  • Discretionary spending among the wealthy is growing faster than for the average US consumer. Discretionary spending among those earning $120,000 a year or more is expected to increase 6.6% in 2016, reaching $406 billion, according to YouGov. Among the top 1%, it's expected to rise 10%. By contrast, discretionary spending for the average US consumer dropped 1% between 2014 and 2015.
  • Wealthy consumers are expected to spend the most next year on fashion, travel, and dining. Among these categories, spending on fashion (specifically, apparel, accessories, and handbags) will grow the most, increasing 6.9% to $37.4 billion (roughly 9% of total discretionary spending). 
  • Luxury brands are over-allocating ad spend to print media. The seven largest US luxury brands collectively spent $133 million last year on holiday ad spending, 57% of which was allocated to magazine ads, according to the Shullman Research Center. But among luxury shoppers, recall rates are higher for digital ads.
  • There are signs that luxury shopping is less brand- and status-oriented than it once was. Luxury shoppers, like the average consumer, enjoy the convenience and low prices of online retailers like Amazon vs. shopping via official brand sites. Luxury shopping may become even more price-sensitive as millennials age. 

 

In full, the report:

  • Sizes the market for personal luxury goods, by country.
  • Measures the effectiveness of luxury marketing channels.
  • Breaks down ad spend among luxury brands.
  • Identifies where luxury consumers shop online and in-store.

 

Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to an All-Access pass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >>Learn More Now
  2. Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

 


 

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Our subscribers consider the INSIDER Newsletters a "daily must-read industry snapshot" and "the edge needed to succeed personally and professionally" — just to pick a few highlights from our recent customer survey.

With our full money-back guarantee, we make it easy to find out for yourself how valuable the daily insights are for your business and career.  Click this link to learn all about the INSIDER Newsletters today.

 

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Scientists have finally figured out why our socks keep getting lost in the wash

Here's how professionals frost cupcakes

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Frosting a cupcake properly takes a little practice, but once you get the hang of it, you'll be making the prettiest cupcakes you've ever seen. Start slowly, be patient, and watch this video to learn how to frost a cupcake like a pro!

Written and produced by Sydney Kramer, Kristen Griffin, and Kim Renfro

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A gigantic boat that's as long as a skyscraper is high cruises around rescuing other gigantic boats

Some of the country's most beautiful historic homes are just a couple of hours outside of New York City — take a peek inside 4 of them

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FDR Home, 8

New York's Hudson Valley is filled with iconic sites that some of America's most influential figures once called home. Politicians, artists, businessmen, and socialites built beautiful estates here in the 1800s, and many are still standing today.

As he grew up in a historic estate named "Aberdeen on the Hudson", which was built in 1802, architecture photographer Nathaniel Cooper grew an appreciation for sturdy, 19th-century design.

"As an architecture photographer, I'm primarily hired to photograph new constructions with modern furnishings," Cooper said to Business Insider. "Photographing historic homes with original and/or era-themed furnishings allows me to catch a glimpse of culturally unique and completely different time periods."

Combining his two interests of architecture photography and historic homes, Cooper got exclusive tours inside some of the most historic homes in the Hudson Valley. Below, see the interiors of homes that once housed Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Vanderbilts.

SEE ALSO: Go inside the beautiful home of a former Goldman Sachs engineer-turned-startup-founder

Springwood Estate in Hyde Park, New York, was the childhood home of former president Franklin D. Roosevelt, and was purchased by his father for $40,000 in 1866.

Source: National Park Service, FDR



The estate was FDR's birthplace, lifelong home, and burial place.

Source: National Park Service, FDR



After FDR married Eleanor in 1905, the newlyweds moved into the estate with his mother. The original furniture can still be seen in the home today.



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3 of the biggest diet pitfalls and how to avoid them

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tswift apple

Some diets aren't all they're cracked up to be.

Instead of making yourself a guinea pig for every new eating fad, wouldn't it be nice if there were a way to tell which diets were phony before trying them out?

Registered dietitian and nutritionist Andy Bellatti recently gave us three pointers to spot — and defeat — a faulty diet tip in minutes:

READ MORE: What the author of 'Eat Fat, Get Thin' eats — and avoids — every day

SEE ALSO: Here's what's in the $200 'Moon Dust' smoothie Gwyneth Paltrow drinks every day

Red flag #1: It emphasizes powders, pills, or both.

"Powders and pills are red flag number one," Bellatti told Business Insider.

The problem with these concoctions, he says, is that they've taken part of something that was once a whole food, like a fruit or a vegetable, then separated and processed it for one ingredient. That's OK for things like cocoa powder, which does have nutrients, but it shouldn't make up the bulk of your eating regimen.

"When something is a powder, you're probably using what, a teaspoon or tablespoon at most? And you have to wonder how much that can really do. Versus a cup of broccoli or a quarter cup of cashews. That’s something significant," says Bellatti.



How to fix it: Go for whole food as much as possible.

Writer Michael Pollan said it best: "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants."

Be sure to incorporate fresh vegetables, like broccoli, bell peppers, and brussels sprouts, into any eating plan. These crunchy, colorful foods — which the CDC actually calls "powerhouse foods" — are a great source of key vitamins and nutrients. They're also high in fiber, which helps keep you feeling full and satisfied until your next meal.



Red flag #2: Its purported "results" are explained in very vague terms.

If the label promises to do things like "Harmonize your aura," chances are it won't do much of anything at all.

One problem with putting slogans like these on health products, says Bellatti, is that they're "completely subjective. They can't be tested." In other words, there's no way of knowing whether a product that claims to "bring you in line with your true self" is really doing so.

And, as Bellatti points out, "The person whose word you're taking is the person who's profiting from this."



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Inside Drake's $8 million mansion with a pool that puts Hugh Hefner to shame

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drake house

So what does it mean to live like Drizzy?

Well, the Toronto native more commonly known as Drake spends much of his time these days in his home in Hidden Hills, California, a gated neighborhood next to Calabasas. The area near Los Angeles has been home to Kanye West, the Kardashian clan, Justin Bieber, and plenty of other rich and/or very famous folks.

But there's something unique about Drake's mansion, which he bought for $7.7 million from Saddle Ranch owner Larry Pollack in mid-2012, Curbed reports.

It has one of the most luxurious pools in the world. With its own grottos, it was designed to outdo Hugh Hefner's notorious Playboy Mansion pool, according to Drake in an interview.

He's apparently somewhat obsessed with pools, as he name-checked his own in a recent song to say it was bigger than Kanye's.

As Drake's newest album "Views" scores the artist's first No. 1 song, below take a look inside the rapper/singer's Hidden Hills paradise.

(Note: Photos come from the real estate site where the house was listed before Drake bought it, so it's missing the artist's customizations.)

SEE ALSO: Inside Prince's massive $10 million mansion where he was found dead

This aerial shot gives you a sense of the enormous size of the house... and especially that pool.



But the front is friendly and not ostentatious.



There are beautiful wooden beams running throughout the house.



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Consider using this baking ingredient the next time you cook meat

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Chinese stir fried pork dish

Here at Business Insider, we love to learn more about the science behind everyday things.

That's why we asked Dan Souza, the executive editor of "Cook's Science" at America's Test Kitchen and one of the authors of "The Science of Good Cooking," for some science hacks he uses to take his cooking to the next level.

One of his favorites? Changing up the acidity of foods using baking soda.

A lot of the foods we eat every day have a pretty high acidity — citrus fruits, for example, are seriously acidic, as is vinegar. But there's not a whole lot you can do to make a food more basic or alkaline.

"Most things we deal with in the kitchen are pretty acidic, so it's easy to go that way, there's not a lot that takes it in the other direction," Souza said. That's why he turns to baking soda, which is very basic. (Its pH level is 9, while lemons have a pH level of 2.) "We actually use baking soda in some really unique ways, not just in cakes and cookies, but we apply it to meat when we're marinating as well."

When you apply baking soda to the meat, Souza said, it helps the meat brown better, a reaction you can see in your cakes and cookies too. "As things become more alkaline they brown better, so if the cake has baking soda in it, you'll see that it has better browning," he said.

And that's not the only thing that happens. Adding baking soda to your marinade also helps the meat hold water better. Souza pointed to a technique called "velveting" that's typically used in Chinese cooking before tossing the meat into a wok to be stir fried. Velveting often uses a combination of cornstarch and egg whites to raise the pH and tenderize the meat.

"We mimic that in the kitchen a lot," Souza said. "If we're doing a stir fry with beef, we'll toss it with baking soda and a little bit of water and let it sit for 15 minutes and then add the rest of the marinating ingredients and cook from there. We get really tender meats that's hard to overcook at that point."

SEE ALSO: A popular way to cook broccoli removes potentially cancer-fighting compounds from it — here's what you should do instead

DON'T MISS: There's a scientific reason why it's so hard to cook the perfect cup of rice

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Here's what fruits and vegetables looked like before we domesticated them

This is the exact number of times you should wash your face every day

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face washing

Hopefully, you wash your face every day. But are you washing it enough?

Dr. Terrence Keaney, a dermatologist working with Dove Men+Care, recommends his male patients wash their face twice a day— and only twice a day.

"When you wash your face, the soap or cleanser that you're using not only strips away the oil and sweat, but also strips away some of the natural lipids in the skin, so it can be potentially irritating," Keaney told Business Insider.

He cautions men against being "over aggressive in their routine," which can apply to body-washing as well. This includes everything from washing too much to scrubbing the skin too hard.

"I'm always cautious and try to prevent people from over-cleansing and creating dryness and irritation," Keaney said.

So what does this mean for your routine? Wash once in the morning when you wake up, and once at night before you go to bed — that's all you need for healthy, clean, and irritation-free skin. Always remember to apply moisturizer afterward to replace the lost moisture in the skin.

The one exception to this is if you do some strenuous activity in the middle of the day — then you would want to wash it another time.

SEE ALSO: How to avoid the underarm issue a surprising number of men suffer from

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