Quantcast
Channel: Business Insider
Browsing All 48808 Browse Latest View Live
Mark channel Not-Safe-For-Work? cancel confirm NSFW Votes: (0 votes)
Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel.
0

The best beard style for every face shape

0
0

A full beard is the most common facial hair for a man today, according to Braun.

But that doesn't mean it works well for everyone. Braun has done extensive research on beard styles and face shapes, and the results may surprise you. Check out this handy graphic for all of Braun's suggestions.

BI_Graphics_Best Beard Style for Every Face Shape (2)

SEE ALSO: These are the 6 trendiest beard styles right now

DON'T FORGET: Follow Business Insider's lifestyle page on Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Take a tour of the $367 million jet that will soon be called Air Force One










Here are the countries that Americans need a visa to visit

0
0

If you're used to traveling within the US, it can be easy to forget that traveling between countries often requires a little more legwork.

Many countries require Americans to have a visa in order to enter the country. We've created a map that shows which countries require Americans to secure a visa before entering.

While this map is a good starting point, it's by no means a comprehensive guide to visas. In some countries, getting a visa is as simple as paying $20 at the airport upon arrival. For others, a visa means extensive paperwork and a trip to that country's embassy months before your trip. Check out the US State Department's website for more detailed information.

Countries That Require Visa Map

Countries That Require Visa Chart

 

SEE ALSO: Here's everything you should do before you travel abroad

FOLLOW US: BI Travel is on Twitter!

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 4 major issues for any American who wants to visit Cuba










VOTE NOW: What are the best colleges in America?

Here's what guys are constantly getting wrong about dress shoes

0
0

Paul Evans, The Martin

Shoes can change the entire look and feel of an outfit, so especially when it comes to dressing up, you want to get it right.

There is one thing, though, that men get wrong over and over again.

"A pitfall that I spot regularly is the absence of diversification in dress shoes," says Jessica Cadmus, founder of The Wardrobe Whisperer. "I typically see 2-3 pairs of black lace-ups in a man's closet and no other choices. Black shoes can be your MVP but cannot be the only players."

Wardrobe Whisperer curates closets for some of the most influential people on Wall Street and beyond, so her clients are looking for pieces that impress without being over-stated. That doesn't mean that you shouldn't play with color and style though.

"What I recommend is a mix of lace-ups and slides in a variety of colors - cognac, brown, black, and burgundy to be specific," said Cadmus.

Also remember taking care of your shoes is important. Try not to wear the same pair two days in row and always store them on cedar shoe trees.  Men's feet tend to produce a lot of moisture, and that's bad for leather.  

Another hack: Get yourself a pair of Vibram soles.

"New Yorkers walk so much that it takes nothing for the pavement to whittle away a shoe's sole," Cadmus explained. "Vibram puts a layer between the sole and the sidewalk which protects the veracity of the shoe. When the Vibram starts to wear down, simply have it replaced."

Now for some examples of shoes to put on your dream team:

You've got to have your standard lace-up in black.

We like this pair from Paul Evans, a direct-to-consumer brand that does Italian shoes and accessories.

paul evans black lace up

You'll need some brown lace-ups as well.

Don't be afraid to go with some perforated detail. This pair is from To Boot New York.

brown lace ups

 

Monkstraps are back in a big way. 

Try this pair in cognac from To Boot New York.

to boot monkstrap

Every man needs a loafer.

Here's another Paul Evans pair in a burgundy hue.

burgundy loafers

 

 

 

 

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 6 compelling correlations that make absolutely no sense










The 20 universities that are most likely to land you a job in Silicon Valley

0
0

Arizona State University Sun Devil Mascot Students Fans Crowd

If your degree comes from one of these schools, you're in demand.

Jobvite, a recruiting platform, analyzed seven million applications and 40,000 hires to determine the schools that had the most students hired by top companies in and around Silicon Valley.

Considering Jobvite is used by tech companies like Twitter, Zendesk, LinkedIn and NewRelic, that means the talent is being placed at some of the hottest companies.

Here's a look at the schools whose grads are finding jobs in the valley:

SEE ALSO: The most important tech entrepreneurs from all 50 states

20. Cornell University



19. University of California, Irvine



18. Arizona State University



See the rest of the story at Business Insider








40 incredible restaurants you should eat at in your lifetime

0
0

Perlan, Iceland

Dining out isn't just about the food. It's about the whole experience.

Some restaurants offer delicious food, incredible views, and an amazing atmosphere — and people travel around the world just to eat at them.

From a snow village in Finland to an underwater restaurant in the Maldives to the best restaurant in the world on the World's 50 Best Restaurants list, here are 40 unforgettable restaurants that are worth traveling the world to eat at.

SEE ALSO: 50 incredible hotels you should sleep in during your lifetime

Follow us! Business Insider is on Instagram

Al Mahara, which is located inside Dubai's luxurious Burj Al Arab hotel, claims to have the best seafood in Dubai. The restaurant's golden archway leads into a dining room built around a stunning aquarium, so guests can watch sharks, sting rays, and fish swim past as they dine.

Click here to learn more about Al Mahara >

See what it's like to dine at Al Mahara >



Offering 16th-floor views of Moscow, Russia, the "Alice in Wonderland"-themed White Rabbit serves Russian delicacies like caviar and truffles. The restaurant was ranked No. 23 on this year's list of the World's 50 Best Restaurants.

To learn more about the White Rabbit, click here >



Taking the number one spot on this year's list of the World's 100 Best Restaurants, El Celler de Can Roca in Girona, Spain, is run by the three Roca brothers who form the perfect restaurant trio: a head chef, a pastry chef, and a sommelier.

To learn more about El Celler de Can Roca, click here >



See the rest of the story at Business Insider








The one thing that all great cities have in common

0
0

Copenhagen

You might think great cities are great because they're big, both in population and geography. 

You would be wrong.

"The fundamental unit that you count to gauge how good a city is not the number of people," says Michael Stumpf, professor of theoretical systems biology at Imperial College London, "but the number of connections."

Stumpf and several of his colleagues recently published a report that found geography and population are largely irrelevant in determining a city's economic output.

What really matters is whether people can meet face-to-face.

As the world collectively packs up its things and swaps suburban life for city living, the study authors express concern over cities that fail to embrace plans for infrastructure, such as subway systems, bus lines, and paths for walking and biking. 

Without good cause to stick around, the authors argue, many inhabitants simply won't.

"Places that allow people to have a rich and varied experience will become more attractive places," says lead author Aaron Sim. "A city which is successful is one that allows people to interact very efficiently, irrespective of the physical extent of the city."

To validate their model, the researchers collected open-source data on US cities and squared the number of connections between people with output. They then put the model to the test with two forms of infrastructure in their hometown of London, the established High-Speed Rail and the emerging Crossrail, which is expected to cut traveling times from London to Birmingham, the country's second-largest city, by almost half.

"So we asked ourselves the question, 'If we were to put this new rail line in tomorrow, how many new connections will we make?'" Stumpf says.

Other mathematical models have had a hard time quantifying the real benefit of bringing people together. According to the co-authors, the new model doesn't have that problem. "What our model gives," Stumpf says, "is an actual percentage increase" to the city's GDP based on each additional connection.

London Big BenThat increase, though it seems small, is a significant 0.3% jump. The authors offer two reasons for the boost being modest, which they say was to be expected.

"First, the stated investment cost is itself a small fraction of London’s GDP," they write. "Second, the modest boost is simply a reflection of the highly concentrated population density in the central regions and the extensive transport infrastructure already in place."

Stumpf concedes that cities can be improved with more people. If it's connections you're after, increasing the population will inevitably give you that effect.

But that solution isn't ideal because it can lead to overcrowding, which drains resources and diminishes quality of life.

Improvements to infrastructure, on the other hand, can yield massive benefits. Berlin has a thriving creative scene. Copenhagen sets the gold-standard for bike-friendliness. And in severalpedestrian-mindedcities around the world, people can get from one end of the city to another without ever crossing the street.

What these features all have in common is their ability to get people interacting. People might bump into one another on the sidewalk, but isolation gets in the way of progress. For the study authors, that consequence is far more dire.

"Cities are more than just the sum of their inhabitants," Sim says. "It's also what the inhabitants can do together."

SEE ALSO: Google's bike plan aims to turn Silicon Valley into the next Copenhagen

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: You get a really long-winded answer when you ask Siri to tell you a story










The most successful female athlete of all time just got body shamed in the New York Times

0
0

Serena WilliamsAs a woman in the public eye, it seems like even being one of the most gifted athletes isn't enough to stop the media from calling you fat. 

On Friday, just as Serena Williams was preparing to clean up her historic sixth Wimbledon victory, the New York Times decided it was a good time to critique her body:

Williams, who will be vying for the Wimbledon title against Garbiñe Muguruza on Saturday, has large biceps and a mold-breaking muscular frame, which packs the power and athleticism that have dominated women’s tennis for years. Her rivals could try to emulate her physique, but most of them choose not to.

The real disgusting part of this, though, is that the Times didn’t really critique Williams. Instead, it let her competitors do it by explaining that they don't envy Williams' physique even as she uses it to dominate them.

In the story, the Times printed the words of several top female tennis players unloading about their body image issues and describing their wish to be seen as small.

“People say, ‘Oh, you’re so skinny, I always thought you were huge,’ ” [Andrea Petkovic] said. “And then I feel like there are 80 million people in Germany who think I’m a bodybuilder. Then, when they see me in person, they think I’m O.K.”

Body image issues are something that should be discussed with a therapist, not a New York Times reporter. That women everywhere have body image issues isn’t exactly news. It’s the opposite of news. It helps no one to have those insecurities validated as worthy of considering by being paraded around in the pages of the New York Times.

I don’t really understand how publishing female tennis players expressing their desire to be perceived as petite does anything other than adding to the public perception that women should be constantly critical of their bodies. And it's all especially silly since Williams' body type that they're belittling is regularly beating them at their own game. 

Saying we shouldn't attack muscular women like Williams for their body types isn’t just about sexism or body positivity. It’s about health. According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, elite athletes have a significantly higher rate of eating disorders (20%) than the average group of women (about 9%), who in turn have a higher rate of eating disorders than men.

That’s in part because many of the personality traits that a person needs to be an elite athlete also show up in patients with eating disorders. The ANAD says these are all the common psychological profiles in common between elite athletes and people who develop anorexia:

  • perfectionism
  • high self-expectations
  • competitiveness
  • hyperactivity
  • repetitive exercise routines
  • compulsiveness
  • drive
  • tendency toward depression
  • body image distortion
  • pre-occupation with dieting and weight

Let's just say that's ten reasons beyond sexism that the media needs to lay off the body shaming.

SEE ALSO: Here's why it's fair that female athletes make less than men

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: You've been folding your socks wrong your entire life










The most successful female athlete of all time just got body shamed in the New York Times

0
0

Serena WilliamsAs a woman in the public eye, it seems like even being one of the most gifted athletes isn't enough to stop the media from calling you fat. 

On Friday, just as Serena Williams was preparing to clean up her historic sixth Wimbledon victory, the New York Times decided it was a good time to critique her body:

Williams, who will be vying for the Wimbledon title against Garbiñe Muguruza on Saturday, has large biceps and a mold-breaking muscular frame, which packs the power and athleticism that have dominated women’s tennis for years. Her rivals could try to emulate her physique, but most of them choose not to.

The real disgusting part of this, though, is that the Times didn’t really critique Williams. Instead, it let her competitors do it by explaining that they don't envy Williams' physique even as she uses it to dominate them.

In the story, the Times printed the words of several top female tennis players unloading about their body image issues and describing their wish to be seen as small.

“People say, ‘Oh, you’re so skinny, I always thought you were huge,’ ” [Andrea Petkovic] said. “And then I feel like there are 80 million people in Germany who think I’m a bodybuilder. Then, when they see me in person, they think I’m O.K.”

Body image issues are something that should be discussed with a therapist, not a New York Times reporter. That women everywhere have body image issues isn’t exactly news. It’s the opposite of news. It helps no one to have those insecurities validated as worthy of considering by being paraded around in the pages of the New York Times.

I don’t really understand how publishing female tennis players expressing their desire to be perceived as petite does anything other than adding to the public perception that women should be constantly critical of their bodies. And it's all especially silly since Williams' body type that they're belittling is regularly beating them at their own game. 

Saying we shouldn't attack muscular women like Williams for their body types isn’t just about sexism or body positivity. It’s about health. According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders, elite athletes have a significantly higher rate of eating disorders (20%) than the average group of women (about 9%), who in turn have a higher rate of eating disorders than men.

That’s in part because many of the personality traits that a person needs to be an elite athlete also show up in patients with eating disorders. The ANAD says these are all the common psychological profiles in common between elite athletes and people who develop anorexia:

  • perfectionism
  • high self-expectations
  • competitiveness
  • hyperactivity
  • repetitive exercise routines
  • compulsiveness
  • drive
  • tendency toward depression
  • body image distortion
  • pre-occupation with dieting and weight

Let's just say that's ten reasons beyond sexism that the media needs to lay off the body shaming.

SEE ALSO: Here's why it's fair that female athletes make less than men

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: You've been folding your socks wrong your entire life










A small cafe in Australia is gaining international fame for its crazy dessert menu

0
0

PâtissezA small bakery in Canberra, Australia is gaining international fame because of its eclectic menu. 

Although Pâtissez only opened 7 weeks ago, its unique desserts are spreading virally on social media and bringing in customers in droves. 

"I wanted to do some really great shakes, and so ridiculous and over the top that people just had to take a photo of it before they ate it," Anna Petridis, co-owner of Pâtissez, told The Canberra Times.    

Petridis along with her mother Gina, both co-owners of Pâtissez, recently appeared on My Kitchen Rulesa televised cooking competition program in Australia.

The mother-daughter duo partnered with Ismael and Astrid Toorawa, two French pastry chefs, to open the popular cafe, according to The Canberra Times.

Pâtissez has four 'epic freak shakes', which retail for $9.50 each.

These include a chocolate fudge brownie shake, a salted caramel shake, a nutella & salted pretzel shake, and a french vanilla shake. 

Check out some of the milkshakes:

 on

 

 on

"I have people waiting an hour for a table, and they'll wait 45 minutes for a shake, because we put a lot of time into them and once we run out that's it for the day – all this is house made, down to the brownie and the marshmallow," Petridis told The Canberra Times.

 on

    

 on

 

"It was like drinking nutella from the jar, but the cream, salted caramel and crushed pretzels took it to another level," wrote Sophia Carlini of the The RiotACT on her nutella & salted pretzel shake.

 on

 

 on

The shakes have gotten so popular that the cafe is having a hard time keeping up with the demand.

"Finally...every element that goes in to each shake is house made (with exception to Mr. Nutella Pretzel) so there is a limit to how much we have each day & with how mad people are for them we sell out of most by the afternoon," the cafe wrote in an Instagram post

Pâtissez also has a number of cool cakes and pastries. Check out this BuzzFeed article for more on the creations. 

SEE ALSO: After a popular chain store refused to give an elderly couple a tea bag, people went crazy on Facebook

Follow Us: On Facebook

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Why Fried Desserts Are Making A Comeback — In Health-Obsessed Los Angeles Of All Places










5 under-the-radar destinations you should visit in 2015

0
0

Have you been to Tulum? No? You might be the only person on earth. When a place gets "discovered," it loses that magical quality that made it worth traveling to to begin with.

Here are alternatives to some of the world's hottest vacation spots—places that will make you think twice before sharing your secret.

THE NEW COSTA RICA: Nicaragua

Granada, NicaraguaAfter decades of political unrest, the Nicaraguan government is investing in infrastructure while preserving the local charm. (How far off the grid can Costa Rica be now that its fourth Starbucks opened in March?)

Where to stay: New York City restaurateur Jean-Marc Houmard and collaborator Yvan Cussigh opened Tribal Hotel (from $125 a night), which features a lush orchid garden and a mosaic-tiled pool, in a former artisan co-op in Granada. The Inn at Rancho Santana (from $249 a night) rests on 2,700 acres of shoreline. The Mukul resort (from $500 a night) has a cigar sommelier and rooms with views of the Pacific.

What to do: Ash boarding, a new extreme sport, sends you zooming down Cerro Negro, a 2,400-foot-high active volcano—on a thin wood or metal board. US.-based Austin Adventures includes the activity on trips (from $2,498 per person).

THE NEW CROATIA: Herdade da Comporta, Portugal

10484132_542559582546445_4098684054592922302_oCroatia's beaches are overrun. Herdade da Comporta, a strip of coastal villages an hour outside Lisbon, is where natives unwind.

Where to stay: The luxury-hotel group Aman hopes to open its resort within the year, but a crop of modern villas are available now, including the Sublime Comporta (from $237 a night), a 14-bedroom guesthouse, and 3 Bicas ($11,000 a week), a pine-tree-rimmed retreat.

What to do: Chill out on beaches and eat at fish shacks (try the fish soup at Praia do Peixe).

THE NEW ICELAND: The Lofoten Islands

Lofoten Islands, NorwayYes, part of Iceland's appeal is its proximity to the East Coast. But when even the director of the Icelandic Tourist Board says the country has too many visitors, it's time to go elsewhere. The Lofoten Islands are in a far-flung corner of the world—a flight from Oslo to the Norwegian village of Evenes followed by an hour-long drive—but that's what makes it an adventure.

Where to stay: The Scandinavian design firm Snøhetta is building a spectacular serpentine-shaped hotel jutting out of the mountains. But for now, stay in restored fishermen's lodgings at Eliassen Rorbuer (from $133 a night).

What to do: Chase the Northern Lights between September and March, or soak up 24 hours of sunlight and kayak with orcas in the summertime (rentals start at about $50 a day).

Hot Spots in the Making

THE NEW NAPA VALLEY: Loudoun County, Virginia

Loudoun

What it still needs: Hotels, restaurants

What it has: Wineries. Loudoun's rolling hills are home to more than 40. Winery 32, which opened last July, is known for a killer Chambourcin.

THE NEW MARTHA'S VINEYARD: Lummi Island, Washington

Lummi Island

What it still needs: Cachet, vacationing presidents

What it has: B&Bs, whale watching, and beaches. And Noma-trained chef Blaine Wetzel, who has made Lummi a must-go for foodies with the Willows Inn (from $125 a night).

More from Details: 

Read the original article on Details.com. Copyright 1969. Follow Details on Twitter.

 

 

SEE ALSO: The 10 best travel books to read this summer

DON'T FORGET: Follow Business Insider's Lifestyle page on Facebook!

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: We just stayed at an Airbnb in Cuba, and this one thing was a big surprise










Nancy Pelosi had a crummy time in the Hamptons this weekend

0
0

Revelers at Southampton's Capri Hotel kept House minority leader Nancy Pelosi up until 4 am last Saturday night, according to the New York Post's Page Six.

But what's really interesting is that, earlier in the night, the 75-year-old was denied a table at the hotel's restaurant and lounge, Beautique, which is the Hamptons offshoot of a New York City hot spot of the same name. You might know it from such shows as "The Real Housewives of New York City." 

Here's the scene — complete with "housewives" — at Beautique in midtown Manhattan. 

beautique

And here's a photo taken at Beautique in Southampton on the night when Pelosi was rebuffed.  

 on


It's not the sort of place where you'd expect to spot the top Democrat in the House of Representatives.

Page Six reports that "guests like Howard Stern already had tables" when Pelosi was turned away for not having a reservation, but that Beautique did serve her a meal in her room. 

Hotel Capri and Beautique are known to get a little rowdy (loud techno music, people dancing on tables, the usual Hamptons behavior), and they tell hotel guests as much when they book.   

Maybe next time Pelosi's aids should put her up in a quieter spot, like the idyllic Topping Rose House, and actually get her a dinner reservation. Gawker's Gabrielle Bluestone gave some solid suggestions for the latter. 

SEE ALSO: Nancy Pelosi Is Upset She Wasn't On The Cover Of Time Magazine

DON'T FORGET: Business Insider is on Twitter

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 5 scientifically proven ways to make someone fall in love with you










This Instagrammer takes incredible pictures of Finland while everyone is asleep

0
0

divided

Self-taught Finnish photographer Mikko Lagerstedt has been capturing breathtaking photos of Finland's landscape since 2008. 

His love of photographing the stars has led to a unique collection of images that capture the country's beauty at nighttime and in the early hours of the dawn. 

For Lagerstedt, the initial inspiration came while driving to his relative's cabin and witnessing the combination of sunshine and fog rising in nearby fields on a rainy day.

Since then, he has made it his goal to capture these stunning moments of nature and has produced an awe-inspiring collection. 

We've put together some of our favorite photos, but you can find his full collection on his Instagram, Facebook, and website

SEE ALSO: 46 stunning Instagram photos that will inspire you to travel the world

Follow us! Business Insider Travel is on Twitter

Langerstadt shows a dreamy side to Finland's lakes with swirls of pinks and blues mixing with evening stars.

Instagram Embed:
http://instagram.com/p/2oYGOINPIy/embed/
Width: 800px

 



He has traveled to Porvoo, in southern Finland, to photograph the rare and majestic sight of the Northern Lights in the sky.

Instagram Embed:
http://instagram.com/p/1p1DYsNPP9/embed/
Width: 800px

 



Here is another shot from the Northern Lights in Porvoo.

Instagram Embed:
http://instagram.com/p/0ntc7AtPDR/embed/
Width: 800px

 

 



See the rest of the story at Business Insider








Look inside the rare Leonardo da Vinci notebook that Bill Gates paid more than $30 million for

0
0

Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates is known to be an avid reader, and his home library is filled with rare books selected by a professional book dealer.

In 1994, he purchased Leonardo da Vinci's "Codex Leicester," a manuscript that dates back to the 16th century. He paid $30.8 million for the journal at auction, a price that made it the most expensive book ever sold.

Gates has put the notebook out on loan to select museums this summer. Currently on view at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Codex Leicester will travel to the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh on August 30. 

Before Minneapolis, the manuscript was on exhibit at the Phoenix Art Museum. 

Written between the years of 1506 and 1510, the 72-page notebook provides a rare glimpse inside da Vinci's mind, complete with sketches, diagrams, and early iterations of ideas.

codex leicester

The Codex Leicester is just one of 30 scientific journals Da Vinci is believed to have authored, but many consider it the most important.

The text is written in Da Vinci's famous mirror-image style, meaning that the words are supposed to be read from right to left. The words are written in an antiquated version of Italian, which is translated on touchscreens situated around the exhibit.  

codex leicestercodex leicester

The Codex Leicester primarily focuses on Da Vinci's thoughts relating to water — tides, eddies and dams — and the relationship between the moon, the Earth, and the sun. 

"It's not a simple document that records his thought processes; it is a very messy document in which he develops his ideas," show curator Alex Bortolot told the Star Tribune

It makes sense that a journal focused on brainstorming ideas would appeal to an entrepreneurial-minded person like Gates.

codex leicester

According to the Star Tribune, Gates has asked that visitors to the museum go through a security screening similar to what you would find at an airport.

He usually makes the manuscript available for exhibit once a year.

SEE ALSO: The 17 best toys of tech's wealthiest executives

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: These college majors lead to the highest starting salaries










Fans of a cult Japanese cleaning method are posting inspiring photos of their de-cluttered homes

0
0

Marie Kondo Interview

Marie Kondo is a Japanese lifestyle celebrity in Japan. She's known for helping people decrease clutter and straighten up their homes for good. And she's developed a fan base so huge, her followers are flooding Instagram with photos of their "kondo-ed" homes.

Her book — "The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing" — became a top seller this year and even earned her a spot on Time's 2015 "Top 100 Influential People" list. 

She also has clients in Japan that seek her out to help them tidy their homes. She encourages them to clean everything in one fell swoop and only keep the objects and clothes that they truly love.

"There is an order to follow: 1. clothes, 2. books, 3. documents, 4. miscellaneous items, 5. mementos," Kondo told Business Insider about her method. "Working in this order, you can improve your judgement and determine which items spark joy."

She told BI that you can tell when something sparks joy when you "feel your body go upward." If something doesn't make you happy when you touch it, Kondo said you should "thank it for its service" and get rid of it.

"When you choose things based on your real feeling, you can choose the right amount of items to totally fit [in you home]," Kondo said. "That is surprising for everyone — this is part of the magic of tidying up."

Bellow you'll see inspiring images of so-called "kondoed" homes that people posted on Instagram. You might even want to start "kondo-ing" yourself.

This might be what your bedroom currently looks like right now. To start "kondo-ing," put all of your clothes in one spot and sort them by what to keep and what to throw away.

Instagram Embed:
http://instagram.com/p/43HpGVJZRa/embed/
Width: 800px

 



The point of kondo-ing your home is to surround yourself with things that you love. Kondo recommends only keeping things that "spark joy," or that make you feel lighter when you touch them. She says you'll recognize the feeling immediately.

Instagram Embed:
http://instagram.com/p/4w-sSHpzPt/embed/
Width: 800px

 



That means you'll probably end up throwing out or giving away a lot of what's in your home.

Instagram Embed:
http://instagram.com/p/5DXt0HvSrJ/embed/
Width: 800px

 



See the rest of the story at Business Insider








YouTube's CEO had the perfect response to a question about work-life balance

0
0

Susan Wojcicki

At Fortune's Fortune Brainstorm Tech 2015 conference in Aspen on Monday, the CEO of YouTube, Susan Wojcicki, got the dreaded question: how do you balance your work life and your home life?

This particular question came at Wojcicki in the form of asking how she balances "entrepreneurialism and 5 children," according to Confide's Jon Brod.

It's the one question from which successful women cannot seem to escape, but Wojcicki was ready to answer.

Her response? "I guess I like to create things."

And really, is there anything more disruptive than creating a new human?  

SEE ALSO: The most successful female athlete of all time just got body shamed in the New York Times

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: The ‘Tesla of scooters’ is finally available and it looks incredible










Men are finally embracing short-shorts — and that's a great thing for menswear

0
0

Men's thighs have been hidden under cargo shorts for too long. Lately they've been making their presence known, and fashion retailers have noticed. 

Rising hemlines in men's shorts isn't really a new trend. The Wall Street Journal and others covered it relentlessly last year. What is new is the endless variety of shorter lengths men have to choose from, making it easier than ever to show as much or as little thigh as you prefer. 

Short shorts

J. Crew offers shorts in an array of lengths, from seven to nine inches. Bonobos sells five-inch shorts.

Chubbies, a company that aims to bring short-shorts to the masses, also sells five-and-half-inch shorts. In fact, sales at the e-commerce start-up are so good that it opened a brick-and-mortar store in San Francisco. The brand has over 1 million fans on Facebook, mostly from college campuses, where Chubbies spreads the short-shorts message to frat brothers. The company expected to sell more than $1 million worth of short-shorts on "Fourth of Julyber" — the summer equivalent to Cyber Monday.

Running

Many men may opt for the just-above-the-knee cut that the nine-inch shorts provide, which is probably the most popular short inseam length available today, while others adopt more revealing styles to show off their "thighceps."

The rise of shorter shorts is something a lot of men will benefit from. It's firmly rooted in the prevailing trends of retro sport-inspired fashion and men being braver about showing a little bit of skin.  

If you're a guy looking to get into the shorter shorts game, you don't have to dive right into Chubbies — a five-inch hemline is a bit short, even for fashion forward gents. We recommend testing the waters with a pair of seven- or eight-inch shorts — eight if you're tall, seven if you're on the short side. Seven-inch hemlines look great on pretty much everyone. 

Oh, and make sure to choose a slim cut.

SEE ALSO: 100 years of American men's fashion, in pictures

DON'T FORGET: Follow Business Insider's lifestyle page on Facebook!

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: This animated map shows how religion spread across the world










These intimate portraits of same-sex couples were taken nearly 30 years before gay marriage was legalized across the US

0
0

sohier_ahwt_11

It is 2015 and same-sex marriage is now legal across the United States.

But in the late 1980s, it was a different story. The gay community was not widely accepted, and couples had to keep their relationships mostly secret. 

It was during this period that photographer Sage Sohier set out across America with her Fuji camera to capture gay couples in their homes. 

“Viewers were familiar with seeing gay day parades, and other ‘colorful’ aspects of the gay community. What they were less familiar with were the private, intimate moments of a couple’s home life,” Sohier told Business Insider in an interview.

Sohier says the recent Supreme Court ruling was "a very moving moment for me. It’s phenomenal how far the country has come on this one issue, and it’s a humanizing moment worth celebrating in an otherwise troubled time.”

Sohier's photos were published last fall in a book called "At Home With Themselves," which is available to buy on her website. A selection of those photos are below, along with more excerpts from our interview with Sohier.

SEE ALSO: 33 ridiculously cool buildings of the future

Sohier started her project in Provincetown, Mass. in August 1986. She says she started “approaching couples at Tea Dances, and talking to them about what I wanted to do." She photographed six couples in Provincetown that first week, and later photographed friends of friends, and placed ads seeking couples in gay newspapers in Boston and around the US.



In addition to the newspaper ads, she also would go to gay parades and gay bars in different cities. “Once I photographed a few couples in a given city, a whole network of couples emerged who were open to being photographed — friends and acquaintances of the couples I had already photographed,” she says.



"Couples would give me a tour of their apartment, and I would ask where they liked to spend time together," Sohier says. "After that, we would choose a couple of different rooms to make pictures in. People made it clear if a particular room was off-limits, and I told them which environments I was most interested in and why."



See the rest of the story at Business Insider








Very soon, robotic drones will automatically follow you (or your kids) around

0
0

CyPhy Works LVL 1 robot drone

By now, most of us have seen a remote-controlled camera drone flying around taking pictures from above.

There's about 1 million of them out there used by hobbyists, according to Helen Greiner, CEO of drone robot company CyPhy Works.

But we haven't seen anything yet, Greiner said during a talk at the Fortune Brainstorm conference in Aspen Colorado on Monday.

Greiner is an MIT alum, who previously co-founded iRobot before launching her new company.

CyPhy Works is building a commercial, robotic drone, which enticed 1,514 backers on Kickstarter to pledge $882,478 to help her do it.

She also raised about $12.5 million in venture funding (all of whom came to her, she says, "I wasn't looking for money," she says.)

helen greinerBy turning a camera drone into an "autonomous robot," Greiner says that drones are set to become a new kind of appliance that's capable of doing things like this:

  • Automatically follow you around taking photos or monitoring your safety.
  • Automatically follow your kids around, playing games with them or watching them for you.
  • With "geo fencing," you can make a drone fly continuously around your property to keep a watchful eye on it.
  • Build a system with unlimited power supply to work with the military, so we won't always pay someone to fly it "when it can fly persistently."

If this sounds frightening, Greiner sought to reassure the audience that it won't be. This will all happen really naturally as we decide we want the services that robotic drones can provide: monitoring real estate, helping with claims adjustment and so on. The kids with drones flying after them won't feel any different than the kids with cell phones tucked in their pockets, she said.

SEE ALSO: YouTube boss confirms music subscription service is relaunching 'later this year'

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: How much sex you should be having in a healthy relationship










The most awesome drone photos of 2015 (so far)

0
0

1 1st Prize Category Places Above the mist Maring Paran Brazil by Ricardo Matiello2

Talented pros and amateurs submitted more than 5,000 entries to aerial photo-sharing website Dronestagram's annual photo contest

Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Ken Geiger led the judging team, which consisted of a panel of experts.

Prizes included features in National Geographic, a new drone and controller, an Adobe Creative Cloud subscription, and more.

From French Polynesia to Bulgaria, these are the best drone photos of 2015.

SEE ALSO: 37 incredible drone photos from across the globe that would be totally illegal today

"Tulip Fields" — 3rd place in Places category



"Lost Island, Tahaa, French Polynesia" — 3rd place in Nature category



"Glorieto Rodolfo Sanchez Taboada, Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico" — 3rd place in Most Liked Picture category



See the rest of the story at Business Insider








Browsing All 48808 Browse Latest View Live