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The latest news from Life

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    new york city subway

    • Living in New York City has its advantages and disadvantages, but there are certain things that New Yorkers have particular trouble putting up with.
    • Author Audrey Noble spoke to 15 NYC residents for this list of the worst things about the city.

     

    As much as I love living in New York City, I have to own up to all the times I've had breakdowns over what living here has to done to me.

    Most of the time it's not an easy or glamorous place to live (don’t let my Instagram fool you). You’ve got to be resilient. You’ve got to be smart. You’ve got to have the will and determination to never give up.

    Don’t get me wrong: For me, the pros of living here outweigh all the cons. But those cons definitely make me pause and wonder why I put up with them in the first place.

    Here are some of the reasons that make even the most die-hard NYC loving millennials almost want to pack up and move:

    SEE ALSO: The worst thing about living in each state

    A coffee is $4.25. — Herm, 27



    Everything is expensive: rent, taxes, drinks. If you live here, prepare to be broke. — Alex Ostebo, 28



    There’s a consistent smell of urine. — Jake Hansen, 28



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb

    • A man who has often been seen traveling with Saudi Arabia's crown prince was photographed entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul just hours before Jamal Khashoggi disappeared.
    • The man has been identified as Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb, a prominent aide to Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.
    • The surveillance footage showing Mutreb could be a key piece of evidence connecting Khashoggi's disappearance to Crown Prince Mohammed.

    A well-known travel companion of Saudi Arabia's crown prince can be seen in surveillance footage walking into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, just hours before Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi disappeared on October 2.

    A time-stamped still image from the footage was published Thursday by Sabah, a pro-government Turkish newspaper, and distributed to international news outlets by The Associated Press. The man has been identified as Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb, whose relationship with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is unclear, though the two are often seen traveling together.

    Sabah also published other photographs showing Mutreb outside the Saudi consul general's home, leaving a Turkish hotel with a large suitcase, and at a Turkish international airport later that same day.

    The footage is believed to be a key piece of evidence connecting Khashoggi's disappearance — and likely death — to Crown Prince Mohammed.

    Time stamps from the photographs show that Khashoggi entered the consulate around 1:15 p.m., and was never seen emerging.

    Meanwhile, Mutreb could be seen entering that same consulate at 9:55 a.m. that morning, then was spotted at the consul general's home by 4:45 p.m., leaving the hotel at 5:15 p.m., and at the airport at 5:58 p.m., according to The New York Times.

    Maher Abdulaziz Mutreb

    Turkish officials have alleged that Crown Prince Mohammed's government sent a team of 15 men to Istanbul to kill Khashoggi at the consulate, though Saudi Arabia is reportedly preparing a report claiming Khashoggi was inadvertently killed during a botched interrogation.

    Turkish investigators, who say they have listened to audio recordings from inside the consulate, reportedly believe that Khashoggi was beaten, tortured, killed, and dismembered after entering the building.

    SEE ALSO: Here's everything we know about the troubling disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    heidi cruz

    • Heidi Cruz says her eldest daughter, Caroline, was not supportive of her decision to take a leave of absence from her job at Goldman Sachs in 2015 to campaign for her husband, Ted.
    • She says in a new profile in The Atlantic that Caroline, who was seven when the campaign started, asked if the job of first lady was paid.
    • When Caroline learned that it was not, she allegedly told her mother: "That's a bad deal for you."

    Ted Cruz's eldest daughter was apparently none-too-pleased that her mother took unpaid leave to help him campaign in the 2016 Republican presidential primary.

    In a profile of Heidi Cruz in The Atlantic published Thursday, the wife of the Texas senator said her daughter Caroline, who was seven when the campaign started, was confused as to why she would leave her job as a managing director at Goldman Sachs to hit the campaign trail.

    "I tried to articulate, you know, 'It's actually for the country, it's a much bigger project than ourselves.'" Cruz told reporter Elaina Plott. "And she wanted to know, if we won, was the first lady paid?"

    When Cruz told her that it was not, Caroline allegedly responded: "That's a bad deal for you. We shouldn't do this."

    caroline cruz ted

    Plott was skeptical Caroline actually said this. "I'm not sure whether this conversation happened word for word with her daughter," Plott wrote. "It may more accurately reflect one Heidi had with herself."

    During the primary, Caroline made some headlines of her own, when television cameras caught her recoiling from her dad's kiss, and later teasing him during a CNN town hall about the fact that her school had footage of him in a pink feather boa for a daddy-daughter picnic.

    While Cruz won the first primary, in Iowa, he started to drag behind then-Republican candidate Donald Trump, and eventually suspended his campaign in May.

    He's currently running for reelection in Texas against Rep. Beto O'Rourke. As of Thursday, Cruz leads O'Rourke by an average of seven points, according to Real Clear Politics.

    SEE ALSO: Protesters heckled Ted Cruz and his wife out of a DC restaurant, and Beto O'Rourke has come to his opponent's defense

    DON'T MISS: Ted Cruz criticizes Goldman Sachs over 'crony capitalism' — even though his wife works there

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    roseanne

    Several of the most popular TV series this year have been established favorites like "The Big Bang Theory," "The Voice," and "NCIS."

    But the surprise hit of the year is ABC's reboot of "Roseanne," a program that drew many millions of viewers each week along with controversy from its firebrand, Trump-supporting lead, Roseanne Barr. That controversy ultimately led to the show's cancellation.

    The "Roseanne" spin-off, "The Conners," premiered this week to 10.5 million viewers. That's a far cry from the "Roseanne" premiere in March, which attracted 18 million viewers, but it's still a hit for ABC.

    To find out which shows were the most popular this year so far, Nielsen estimated the average number of US viewers tuning in to regularly scheduled programming.

    ABC's massive success with "Roseanne," along with CBS' high ratings across numerous shows on this list, demonstrates how broadcast networks remain the heavyweights in overall viewership — even in the age of streaming.

    Here are the 10 most popular TV shows of 2018 so far, according to Nielsen's ratings:

    SEE ALSO: 'The Conners' premiere fell well short of 'Roseanne' in ratings, but it's still a hit for ABC

    10. "The Voice" (NBC) — 12.5 million

    Series run: 14 seasons (2011-present) 

    Summary: "Singers square off for a coveted recording contract in this reality talent contest from the producers of 'Big Brother' and 'Survivor.' Four vocal coaches mentor the contestants."



    9. "NCIS: New Orleans" (CBS) — 12.7 million average viewers

    Series run: 4 seasons (2014-present) 

    Summary: "A drama about the local field office that investigates criminal cases involving military personnel in The Big Easy, a city known for its music, entertainment and decadence."



    8. "Blue Bloods" (CBS) — 13.2 million average viewers

    Series run: 8 seasons (2010-present)

    Summary: "A drama about a multi-generational family of cops dedicated to New York City law enforcement."



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Robert Mueller

    • Special counsel Robert Mueller is said to be asking Paul Manafort for information on the GOP strategist Roger Stone.
    • Mueller's questions likely focus on whether Manafort has any knowledge of whether or not Stone knew in advance of WikiLeaks' plans to dump batches of hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton campaign.
    • Stone told Business Insider he is "unconcerned" about the development, adding that he believes Mueller has no evidence against him "because none exists."
    • Stone appears to be girding for the possibility that he may be charged in the Russia investigation.
    • He is seeking donations to a legal defense fund and will announce new additions to his legal team after the November midterms.

    Special counsel Robert Mueller is asking Paul Manafort, the former chairman of President Donald Trump’s campaign, for information about the longtime GOP strategist Roger Stone, ABC News reported.

    Manafort has been cooperating with the ongoing Russia investigation since September, when he pleaded guilty to two counts of conspiracy and obstruction of justice.

    He is arguably the most significant cooperating witness to date, given his prominent role on the Trump campaign during a pivotal time in the 2016 election season.

    Manafort was the chairman of President Donald Trump's campaign when he offered a Russian oligarch "private briefings" on Trump's bid. He was one of three top Trump campaign officials to attend a meeting with two Russian lobbyists offering dirt on Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton at the height of the campaign.

    And he was leading the campaign when the radical pro-transparency group WikiLeaks began dumping thousands of emails from the Democratic National Committee that had been stolen by Russian operatives.

    Mueller has in recent months zeroed in on Stone's links to WikiLeaks.

    WikiLeaks published thousands of hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee and the Clinton campaign at the height of the 2016 election. The US intelligence community believes the breaches and subsequent dissemination of emails were carried out on the Kremlin's orders.

    When prosecutors indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers in July on conspiracy and hacking charges, they referenced WikiLeaks — though not by name — as the Russians' conduit to release stolen documents via the hacker Guccifer 2.0, who is believed to be a front for Russian military intelligence.

    Manafort was the chairman of Trump's campaign amid the Russian hacking effort.

    WikiLeaks dumped the first batch of hacked Democratic emails on July 22, 2016. Days later, on August 2, Manafort met with the Russian military intelligence operative Konstantin Kilimnik and later said they discussed the Trump campaign and the DNC hack. Kilimnik said they did not discuss the campaign but talked about "current events" and "unpaid bills," believed to be a reference to Manafort's financial debt to the Russian-Ukrainian oligarch Oleg Deripaska.

    On August 21, Stone blasted out a tweet that said, "Trust me, it will soon [be] Podesta's time in the barrel," an apparent reference to Clinton campaign manager John Podesta.

    roger stone

    WikiLeaks published a batch of hacked emails from Podesta's account days later.

    Stone's tweet and several others raised questions about whether he had prior knowledge of WikiLeaks' plans.

    Stone denies knowing about the document dump in advance.

    "Mr. Mueller has no evidence whatsoever of Russian collusion, WikiLeaks collaboration, advance notice of the acquisition and publication of John Podesta's emails or any other illegal activity pertaining to the 2016 election, because none exists," he told Business Insider in an earlier statement.

    The GOP strategist is known to have been in direct communication with WikiLeaks and Guccifer 2.0 during the election, and it's likely Mueller's questions to Manafort drill down on ties between Stone and WikiLeaks.

    Stone said he has communicated indirectly with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in the past through the radio host Randy Credico. Credico denies the claim, and he said following a grand jury appearance in September that prosecutors had demonstrated interest in Stone's statement.

    In addition to Credico, Mueller has questioned nearly a dozen of Stone's associates, and many of them later appeared before a federal grand jury.

    Asked about his thoughts on what Mueller may be asking Manafort, Stone replied, "I am unconcerned," and referenced the statement he made when Manafort's cooperation deal was first announced.

    "It has no bearing on me," he said at the time.

    But Stone appears to be girding for the possibility that he will be indicted. Business Insider reported earlier this year that he is planning on expanding his legal team and continues to solicit donations to a legal defense fund. He told Business Insider on Wednesday that he will announce the new additions to his team after the November midterm elections.

    SEE ALSO: Roger Stone asks for donations to his legal defense fund and seeks to expand legal team as Mueller closes in on him

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    San Francisco

    San Francisco is a tough place live for a lot of reasons.

    Sky-high housing prices can make it nearly impossible to find a place. In February, a 1,000-square-foot home with no working plumbing and a pile of rotting mattresses stacked in the kitchen sold for more than $520,000.

    Even tech moguls and startup founders are having trouble finding homes in an area where nearly every spare piece of real estate is gobbled up by the highest bidder. One firm estimated that a home buyer needs to make about $300,000 a year just to afford a median-priced abode.

    But San Francisco isn't just perilously overpriced: It's also perpetually teetering on the edge of disaster. On October 18, the city of San Francisco participated in an annual earthquake drill called the Great California Shakeout, a dry run where more than 10 million people across the state practiced a "drop, cover, and hold on" earthquake survival protocol.

    None of those people are quite old enough to remember this, but on April 18, 1906, a violent ~7.7-7.9 magnitude earthquake leveled the city into ruins. The minute-long quake ruptured 296 miles of California coastline, sparked three days of fires, and killed 3,000 people, leaving the bulk of the city homeless.

    That was just 112 years ago — the geologic equivalent of the blink of an eye. 

    If earthquakes don't shake you, consider that the city is literally sinking into mud — and into trash in certain places.

    Real-estate woes aside, here are the ways that scientists know living in the Bay Area is not for the faint of heart:

    SEE ALSO: 11 potentially cancer-causing things you might use every day

    The Bay Area is a veritable smorgasbord of complex fault lines. No less than seven different faults converge here.

    The well-known San Andreas Fault is just one of the seven "significant fault zones" the US Geological Survey (USGS) cites in the Bay Area. The others are the Calaveras, Concord-Green Valley, Greenville, Hayward, Rodgers Creek, and San Gregorio Faults.

    People who live in the area experience small earthquakes and shakes all the time. But those aren't the rumbles that scare seismologists. 

     

     



    It's the bigger, disastrous quakes scientists are really worried about. And they say San Francisco is due for another soon.

    In 2007, the USGS determined that there was about a "63% probability of a magnitude 6.7 or greater earthquake in the Bay Area" by 2037.

    Estimates have only gotten worse since then. One recent report suggested that there is a 76% chance the Bay Area will experience a magnitude 7.0 earthquake within the next three decades.



    Seismologists are most concerned about two fault lines in particular: the San Andreas and the Hayward.

    Anything higher than a 7.9 on the San Andreas Fault line, which runs from Mendocino to Mexico, would put "approximately 100%" of the population of San Francisco at risk, while a 6.9 quake from the Hayward Fault could spell trouble for nearly everyone who lives and works there, according to the city.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    ntt docomo lightest thinnest phone

    While Apple, Google and other major handset makers are packing smartphones with ever more bells and whistles, a Japanese company is releasing a phone that latches onto another trend: the rise of the smaller, simpler smartphone.

    NTT Docomo is scheduled to release a phone in November that they claim is the world's thinnest and lightest smartphone ever made, and is designed as a "lite" version with only basic smartphone capabilities.

    But this isn't even first phone produced this year that prides itself on being so tiny. Here's how NTT Docomo's Card Keitai KY-01L stacks up against other smartphones that aim to be more ultra-mobile and simplistic than ever.

    SEE ALSO: Microsoft finally made an Xbox I actually want to buy

    NTT Docomo says its phone is the "world's thinnest" smartphone, and is the size of a credit card.

    The Card Keitai KY-01L is about the size of a credit card, give or take a few millimeters on the length and width. At 0.2 inches, the phone is incredibly skinny and really not that much thicker than a normal credit card.



    The KY-01L can make phone calls and browse the web, but that's about it.

    When a phone is so small in size, some sacrifices have to be made. This is definitely a "lite" smartphone. The phone has LTE connectivity and 4G for phone calls and web browsing. However, the phone does not have a camera or any store to download apps from.



    Palm released an "ultra-mobile" phone last week whose size is also comparable to a credit card, but has more functionality.

    Palm's device is designed, like the KY-01L, to be small enough to fit in your wallet alongside your credit cards.

    But as Business Insider reported last week, the Palm phone acts as a "companion" smartphone that actually works in tandem with your regular-sized smartphone. Unlike the NTT Docomo phone, Palm's device has a full set of smartphone functions, including a camera, an app store, and a voice assistant.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    John Kelly John Bolton Trump

    • White House chief of staff John Kelly and National Security Adviser John Bolton got into a "profanity-laced" screaming match outside the Oval Office.
    • The argument revolved around difference of opinion over the White House's response to the drastic influx of migrants crossing the southern border.
    • White House officials, however, told both Bloomberg and CNN that things had calmed down since the blowout fight.

    White House chief of staff John Kelly and National Security Adviser John Bolton got into a "profanity-laced" screaming match outside the Oval Office, sources familiar with the incident told CNN and Bloomberg. 

    The argument revolved around difference of opinion over the White House's response to the drastic influx of migrants crossing the Southern border–and Kelly got even angrier when Trump took Bolton's side, CNN reported.

    Over the past few days, Trump has fired off a series of angry tweets against Central American governments, which he blames in part for enabling a caravan of 4,000 Honduran migrants currently traveling to the US border to seek asylum in the United States. 

    "In addition to stopping all payments to these countries, which seem to have almost no control over their population, I must, in the strongest of terms, ask Mexico to stop this onslaught - and if unable to do so I will call up the U.S. Military and CLOSE OUR SOUTHERN BORDER!" Trump wrote on Thursday morning.

    Aides who spoke to CNN said that while fighting and arguments are not uncommon in the West Wing, they were "startled" by the loud shouting and profanity, causing some to wonder if either would resign.

    White House officials, however, told both Bloomberg and CNN that things had calmed down since the blowout fight, and neither had plans to resign.

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Donald Trump Xi Jinping

    • President Donald Trump announced that the US would withdraw from the Universal Postal Union, a 192-country treaty that helps to set international postage rates.
    • The decision appears to be a direct shot at China.
    • Chinese goods coming into the US are currently subject to lower postage rates, making it cheaper to ship items into America.
    • The Trump administration argued this gives an unfair advantage to China and incentivizes importing knock-off goods from the country.
    • The move is also the latest salvo in the US-China trade war.

    President Donald Trump announced that the US would pull out of an obscure 144-year-old postal treaty, in what looks to be his latest direct shot at China.

    The Trump administration announced Wednesday that the US would leave the the Universal Postal Union treaty, an agreement from 1874 that helps to standardize postal rules among the international community.

    The interesting aspect of the UPU decision is a more recent addition to the agreement. The UPU, which is now under the United Nations' purview, sets rates that national postal services pay to ship goods internationally. Under a deal reached in 1969, developing countries can ship smaller items at lower rates than developed nations like the US. The provision is designed to help facilitate exports from smaller countries to give a boost to growing economies.

    But the provision also allows Chinese producers to ship items to the US at significantly low rates even compared to some US domestic shipping rates. The Trump administration says many companies even offer free shipping to the US from China because of these lower rates — and as a result, roughly 60% of inbound shipping to the US comes from China.

    The treaty was tweaked in 2016 to adjust for some of the advantages to China after complaints from US administrations of both political parties. But the Trump administration argued that the changes were insufficient and the Chinese still received special treatment. It also said the cheaper rates incentivize the purchase of knock-off or counterfeit goods from China. 

    Peter Navarro, Trump's uber-protectionist and anti-China adviser, attacked the UPU as part of a Financial Times op-ed in September.

    "Consider this: it costs more to ship a package through the US Postal Service from Los Angeles to New York City than it costs to ship that same package from Beijing to New York," Navarro wrote. "This inequity puts American small businesses and manufacturers at a severe competitive disadvantage."

    The decision to remove the US from the treaty represents another strike at China in the ongoing trade war, as the Trump administration attempts to force the country to make major economic changes and reduce the US trade deficit with the country.

    The highlights of that trade fight have been the tariffs each country has slapped on the other. Trump has imposed tariffs on just over $250 billion worth of Chinese imports coming into the US and has threatened tariffs on another $267 billion. China responded with tariffs on $110 billion worth of US goods, and the government is prepared to move forward with more restrictions.

    The decision also mirrors the growing nature of the conflict with the Chinese. The US has undertaken a series of efforts that point to an escalation of its confrontation with Beijing, including sanctions on members of China's defense ministry and allegations of election tampering.

    SEE ALSO: Trump's favorite report card for the trade war keeps getting uglier

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    jack whittaker lottery winner

    • Lottery players everywhere dream of striking a multi-million-dollar jackpot with a winning ticket.
    • But there's a dark side to coming into a windfall of sudden wealth if you're not careful.
    • Here's what it's really like to win the lottery.

    Becoming substantially wealthier thanks to a tiny piece of paper would make your life so much better, right?

    In fact, recent research suggests that lottery winners are more satisfied with life than those who lost the lottery and that this happiness is lasting, Business Insider reports.

    But winning a lottery jackpot can also have some unwanted side effects.

    Here's what it's really like to win the lottery.

    SEE ALSO: 20 lottery winners who lost every penny

    Lottery players everywhere dream of hitting the jackpot.



    The idea of striking rich is enticing enough for the average American to spend $207 a year on lottery tickets.

    Source: CBS News



    In reality, though, your chances of actually winning are pretty slim — you have a better chance at getting struck by lightning than you do at winning a Mega Millions or Powerball contest.

    Source: CBS News and National Geographic



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Paul Manafort

    • Paul Manafort has reportedly visited the special counsel Robert Mueller's office at least nine times over the last month.
    • Once there, he and his lawyers are said to have spent at least six hours at a time with prosecutors.
    • Manafort is Mueller's most significant cooperating witness to date, and his frequent trips to Mueller's office indicate the Russia investigation is not slowing down any time soon.

    Paul Manafort has visited the special counsel Robert Mueller’s office at least nine times over the past month, for hours at a time, CNN reported.

    A black SUV carrying Manafort has reportedly been seen arriving at Mueller's office around 10 a.m. ET several times since September. Manafort's lawyers are said to arrive at the same time, and they all spend around six hours inside the special counsel's office at a time.

    Manafort pleaded guilty in September to two counts of conspiracy and obstruction as part of the ongoing Russia investigation.

    He is arguably Mueller’s most significant cooperating witness to date, given his role leading President Donald Trump’s campaign during the most pivotal period in the 2016 election.

    Manafort was the chairman of the Trump campaign when he offered a Russian oligarch "private briefings" on Trump's bid. He was one of three top Trump campaign officials to attend a meeting with two Russian lobbyists offering dirt on Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

    And he was leading the campaign when the radical pro-transparency group WikiLeaks began dumping thousands of emails from the Democratic National Committee that had been stolen by Russian operatives.

    Manafort's cooperation with the special counsel comes amid heightened calls from the president’s allies for Mueller to wrap up the Russia investigation.

    Mueller has not given any public indication that he will do so. But two US officials told Bloomberg this week that the special counsel is close to getting answers to the two core questions in the investigation: whether members of the Trump campaign colluded with Moscow to sway the 2016 race in his favor, and whether Trump sought to obstruct justice after the existence of the Russia probe became public knowledge.

    News out of Mueller’s office has been slow over the last few weeks as the November 6 midterm election approaches, a sign that prosecutors are adhering to DOJ guidelines that warn against taking any overt actions that can be seen as influencing the outcome of an election.

    Robert Mueller

    But Manafort’s frequent trips to Mueller’s office indicate the investigation is doing anything but slowing down.

    On Wednesday, ABC News reported that Mueller’s prosecutors have been grilling Manafort for information on the longtime GOP strategist Roger Stone. Stone told Business Insider he didn’t do anything wrong but expects to be charged soon because he believes he is being "framed."

    Legal experts say they expect to see a string of new revelations from Mueller’s office once the election is over, but that they don’t anticipate the special counsel releasing a final report of his findings any time soon.

    What he may do, they added, is release a report of his findings in the obstruction inquiry, which he is reportedly close to wrapping up.

    Meanwhile, Trump's team is currently in the middle of providing written answers to the special counsel on questions focusing on potential collusion with Russia. Mueller has reportedly made clear that he wants to ask follow-ups as well, and prosecutors have not ruled out a one-on-one sit-down with the president.

    Jed Shugerman, a professor at Fordham Law School, said he believes it is significant that Mueller agreed to narrow the scope of his initial questions for Trump to focus on collusion rather than obstruction.

    "It suggests Mueller thinks that's more significant and worthwhile at this stage," he said.

    Shugerman added that Mueller's questions about collusion indicate that "he probably has sufficient evidence for obstruction. If forced to allocate his time to obstruction or Russia, he is choosing Russia. And probably [because] he has big leads."

    SEE ALSO: Mueller is said to be asking Paul Manafort for information on Roger Stone

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Se Busca Mezcal

    • Business Insider spoke to Stoli Group Brand Ambassador Simone Bodini to find out what the difference between tequila and mezcal is.
    • It turns out tequila is actually a mezcal.
    • However, tequila is produced with blue weber agave only, and is produced only in the state of Jalisco and some municipalities of Michoacan, Nayarit, Tamaulipas, and Guanajuato.
    • A different method is also used in the production process.

    Whether you've always been a fan or are only just discovering them, there's no denying that tequila and mezcal are becoming pretty trendy.

    But if you don't actually know the difference between the two, you're probably not alone.

    Business Insider spoke to Stoli Group Brand Ambassador Simone Bodini to get to the bottom of what they really are.

    Born and bred in Italy, the 38-year-old has been in the drinks industry since 1997, and was even crowned Bartending World Champion in 2006.

    As Global Brand Ambassador, he now travels the world training, teaching masterclasses, and telling the stories of the company's brands, including Se Busca mezcal, which launched in July this year.

    "Actually, tequila is a mezcal," Bodini told Business Insider — but there are a number of ways they two are different.

    "The word mezcal comes from the nahuatl which means cooked agave," he said. "In Mexico, all the agave spirits are called mezcal, but then we have the denomination of origins."

    He explained that tequila is produced with blue weber agave only, while mezcal in general can be produced with one or a combination of the 28-39 species of agave.

    He added that tequila is also produced only in the state of Jalisco and some municipalities of Michoacan, Nayarit, Tamaulipas, and Guanajuato, while mezcal is produced in many parts of Mexico, including Oaxaca — where Se Busca is made — Durango, Guerrero, Zacatecas, Michoacan, Puebla, and San Luis Potosi.

    "To make tequila the heart of the plants or 'piñas' are usually cooked with steam (brick oven, autoclave, etc.). For the artisanal mezcal, a different method is applied — the piñas are cooked with wood fire ground ovens to give mezcal its smoky flavour profile. It's an intense labour production, handcrafted, with very low use of machines.

    "Fermentation is achieved using native wild yeasts in open vats and distillation is carried out in small volume with copper stills (batch distillation)."

    simone mezcal funny

    According to Bodini, people often assume mezcal has to come with an agave worm in the bottle, but he says this is a myth.

    "They used to put a worm in the spirit to show the difference between mezcal from tequila," he explained.

    Se Busca isn't the only new mezcal on the block

    FAMILY_LINE UP_OnWhite

    Casamigos, the brand launched by George Clooney and Rande Gerber which was bought by Diageo for $1 billion in 2017, also brought out a mezcal in February this year.

    "We were lucky enough to meet the family who was making the best mezcal in Oaxaca, Mexico and once we tried it, we knew it would eventually become part of the Casamigos family," Gerber told Business Insider. "At the time, all of our attention was focused on sharing Casamigos Tequila with the world, but we didn't want to lose the chance of having this mezcal, so we stayed in touch with them.

    "They understood our passion and commitment to Casamigos and were kind enough to be patient."

    He added that the mezcal is "smooth with no burn and smoked to perfection," thanks to the mezcal production process which creates "the distinct smoky flavour."

    'Mezcal is meant to be kissed'

    To enjoy mezcal, which Bodini calls "the most complex spirit in the world," the Stoli ambassador stressed that you don't shoot it, but instead drink it slowly, whether that's neat or in a cocktail like a margarita, mule, or Old Fashioned.

    "One reason is because mezcal is higher in alcohol volume than other spirits, so you should drink it with respect," he said. "In Oaxaca we drink Se Busca mezcal neat, sometimes with worm salt by the side."

    He added: "Also, remember that mezcal can be the produce of more than 20 species of agave, so sip it slowly so you can taste the agave notes. As the people of Mexico say 'that mezcal is meant to be kissed.'"

    If you're still confused, check out this chart which explains the difference between the two:

    STOLI INFOGRAPHIC_Mezcal vs Tequila_Final

    SEE ALSO: This is the real difference between whisky and whiskey

    SEE ALSO: These 28-year-old Londoners are taking on George Clooney's Casamigos tequila with Enemigo, a $5 million luxury brand that means 'enemy' in Spanish

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    Satya Nadella shoes

    • For many of the Valley's elite, the right pair of kicks is a trademark accessory carefully selected to convey a mix of power and nonchalance, creativity, and exclusivity.
    • With help from the team at the sneaker marketplace Flight Club, Business Insider compiled some of the most fashionable, expensive, and downright wild sneakers worn by tech founders and CEOs.

    The inhabitants of Silicon Valley are not exactly known for haute couture.

    It's a land where jeans, T-shirts, and hoodies reign supreme, and where sneakers are the footwear of choice.

    But don't let the pedestrian fashion item fool you. These sneakers can be as rare and as status-defining as the fine watches adorning the wrists of Wall Street bankers or the designer handbags clutched by elite art dealers.

    For many of the Valley's elite, the right pair of kicks is a trademark accessory carefully selected to convey a mix of power, nonchalance, creativity, and exclusivity.

    With help from the team at the sneaker marketplace Flight Club, Business Insider compiled some of the most fashionable, expensive, and downright wild sneakers worn by tech founders and CEOs. The Flight Club team helped confirm the brands and styles and provided expert commentary and analysis.

    We did our best to find photos of female tech executives wearing sneakers, but our search didn't yield many results. Women such as Sheryl Sandberg and Marissa Mayer wore low heels, flats, or loafers, which says something about how much freedom women have to dress down in the corporate world.

    If you dream of becoming the next Mark Zuckerberg, lacing up a pair of these sneakers probably won't get you very far. But at least you'll look the part.

    Check it out:

    SEE ALSO: Inside the crazy-successful, controversial life of billionaire Uber CEO Travis Kalanick

    Mark Zuckerberg: Nike Flyknit Lunar 3 in Wolf Grey

    Since Nike's Flyknit franchise was introduced in 2012, Flight Club says it has seen resale values in "the hundreds, and some well over a thousand."

    The Wolf Grey sneakers favored by Zuckerberg, Facebook's CEO, aren't currently sold in stores, but you might be able to find them on eBay.

    Price: A similar pair costs $110.





    Satya Nadella: Lanvin Suede & Patent Leather Low-Top Sneaker

    When the Microsoft CEO took the helm in 2014, it quickly became clear he was stylish. So it's no surprise he opts for a more fashion-forward take on sneakers, with a pair from the French high-end brand Lanvin. Even sneaker lovers on Reddit have inquired about Nadella's kicks.

    Price: $525



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    306Hollywood_ElTigre

    • Elan and Jonathan Bogarín's debut movie "306 Hollywood" is part documentary, part art exhibit.
    • The two siblings cope with the passing of their grandmother by going into her house and using the things she left behind to celebrate her life.


    Every weekend we pick an indie movie currently playing in theaters we think is definitely worth your time and money, and this week's is "306 Hollywood."

    Annette Ontell lived seven decades in the same house at 306 Hollywood Avenue in Hillside, New Jersey, in which she was everything from a housewife to a fashion designer. So how do you celebrate someone who has lived such a full life? You explore what was left behind. 

    Ontell's grandchildren, Elan and Jonathan Bogarín, use their directing debut to commemorate their late grandmother with the beautifully touching and creatively told "306 Hollywood." The two take us into Ontell's home to not just marvel at the knickknacks, clothes, and keepsakes that are inside but flesh out the memories they had with her to examine what Ontell's life meant to them.

    But Elan and Jonathan go into the house as if they are on an archeological dig. They give every item in the house (down to the paper clips and toothbrushes) a respect that it didn't have when Ontell was alive.

    However, that's the beauty of the movie: its almost insane attention to detail to celebrate Ontell while also understanding who she was as a person — not just their grandmother. 

    "306 Hollywood" is part documentary and part art exhibit that will make you think about your own mortality, that you really need to call your grandmother more often, and that you really, really need to clean your place.

    See where "306 Hollywood" is playing near you.

    Our indie movie picks from previous weekends:

    SEE ALSO: "Am I mature enough to lead a group of people?": Jonah Hill opens up about the anxieties and triumphs in his 4-year journey to make his acclaimed directorial debut, "Mid90s"

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    private plane jet luxury

    • Private jets are the choice mode of travel for billionaires, CEOs, celebrities, and world leaders.
    • These aircraft cost millions to hundreds of millions of dollars and often come with luxurious leather seats, full dining rooms, private bedrooms, and fine cuisine.
    • Here's what it's like to fly on a private plane.

     

    The preferred mode of travel for billionaires, CEOs, celebrities, and world leaders, the private jet can be seen as the epitome of luxury and wealth.

    Traditional commercial flying is an affordable service for the masses, but flying on a private jet is a very different world, Eric Roth, president of International Jet Interiors, told Business Insider.

    "Privacy, productivity, comfort, luxury and convenience are some of the major differences between flying private vs. commercial," Roth said. "You decide when you want to leave – YOU dictate the schedule — not the airlines. Chinese food for your flight from Teterboro to Van Nuys? No problem. Need to change your plans mid-flight and reroute to another city? OK."

    Private plane travel represents freedom for those who can afford it, he said.

    "Flying on a private jet can be the difference of being at three different cities for meetings and still returning home at a decent hour. Time is the one commodity that even money can not buy. A private jet is the best way to 'buy time,'" Roth said.

    Here's a look at what it's like flying on a private plane.

    SEE ALSO: Take a look inside 8 of the most luxurious private jets in the world

    DON'T MISS: 5 things you should know if you're flying private for the first time

    Flying on a private jet is a luxury form of travel usually associated with the ultra-wealthy, celebrities, business magnates, and world leaders.

    Source: Business Insider



    Private aviation didn't start becoming popular until the 1960s, after the first Learjet took flight in 1963.

    Source: Solairus



    In the 1970s, private planes were exactly as groovy as you'd expect.

    Source: Getty Images



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Virgin Australia Boeing 737 800

    • A Virgin Australia plane had to make an emergency landing after passengers reported a "burning smell," coming from the plane, according to multiple reports. 
    • Virgin Australia Flight 465 took off from Perth International Airport at 7:03 a.m. on Thursday, October 18, with an intended destination of Brisbane Airport.
    • Approximately three hours into the flight the captain notified the rest of the plane of "an electrical issue," and announced the plane would need to be diverted to Adelaide Airport.
    • "The aircraft was met on arrival by emergency services as a precaution and all passengers and crew safely disembarked the aircraft," a Virgin Australia spokesperson told WA Today. 

    A Virgin Australia plane had to make an emergency landing after passengers reported a "burning smell," coming from the plane, according to multiple reports. 

    According to data from Flight Aware, Virgin Australia Flight 465 took off from Perth International Airport at 7:03 a.m. on Thursday, October 18, with an intended destination of Brisbane Airport. Perth and Brisbane are two cities located on opposite coasts of Australia. 

    The Daily Mirror reports that shortly after takeoff, passengers reported "a distinct electrical burning smell" to the flight crew, with one passenger noting the flight crew seemed "anxious." 

    According to The Daily Mirror, approximately three hours into the flight the captain notified the rest of the plane of "an electrical issue," and announced the plane would need to be diverted to Adelaide Airport, off the southwest coast of Australia, where it would land prematurely. 

    Virgin Australia Flight Aware Screenshot

    Virgin Australia did not respond to Business Insider's request for comment. 

    "In accordance with standard operating procedures, the captain made the decision to divert to Adelaide Airport as a precautionary measure after an odor was detected in the cabin," a Virgin Australia spokesperson told WA Today, a newspaper covering Western Australia.

    "The aircraft was met on arrival by emergency services as a precaution and all passengers and crew safely disembarked the aircraft," the statement added.

    This is not the first time in 2018 that a strange smell has forced a plane to divert from its original course. In July, a Spirit Airlines plane flying from New York to Florida had to be diverted after passengers aboard complained of burning throats and chest pains caused by an odor that resembled, "dirty socks."

    In May, a similar incident of crew members reporting an "electrical smell" forced an Allegiant Air flight to make an emergency landing in North Carolina. 

     

    SEE ALSO: A Spirit Airlines flight had to be diverted after a horrible 'dirty socks' odor filled the cabin and made passengers ill

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    mid90s_02 a24

    • Jonah Hill's directorial debut is a beautifully authentic look at a kid trying to find acceptance in LA.
    • If you're a fan of '90s music, get ready for this soundtrack.


    We’ve seen Jonah Hill evolve from playing the comedic roles to impressive dramatic performances, and now we are about to witness his latest evolution: being a director.

    With the release of "mid90s" (opening October 19), Hill has created one of the most heartwarming movies of the year as we follow the life of young teen Stevie (Sunny Suljic), as he tries to find the acceptance and love that he can't get at home.

    Set in the (you guessed it) mid-1990s, Stevie is an LA 13-year-old who spends most of his time wanting to gain the acceptance of his older brother, Ian (Lucas Hedges), but instead gets beat up by him. With his mother (Katherine Waterston) never around, Stevie spends most of his time away from home and that hunger for friendship finally lands him at a skate shop.

    There friends Ray (Na-kel Smith), F---shit (Olan Prenatt), Ruben (Gio Galicia), and Fourth Grade (Ryder McLaughlin), spend their days skating and teasing each other.

    Stevie is instantly drawn into their world and finally finds acceptance when, while hanging to the side while they all skate, Ray asks him, "Go fill up this jug of water." Stevie grabs the plastic jug and races to the faucet to fill it as quickly as he can. That simple sequence sets the tone for the entire movie. That one small gesture of recognition proves to Stevie that someplace in this world he actually belongs.

    Now that's not to say that "mid90s" doesn't have a little edge to it, because it certainly does. Hill is introducing us to the skate culture, not the Boy Scouts. We watch as Stevie drinks and smokes with the guys, hooks up with a girl, and takes a really nasty fall off a roof while trying to show off his skating skills. And then there are his troubles at home, which get really dark at one point. But through it all, Hill brings it back to friendship and how even when things are at their most dark, friends are there to pick you up.

    Hill has an incredible eye for talent, as he casts an unknown group of actors to play his leads, and all of them give a very improvisational feel.

    And then there's the authenticity of the movie itself. Shot on Super 16mm with a 4:3 aspect ratio (meaning the screen is going to be narrower than most movies you see in theaters), it beautifully captures an era when smartphones and social media were on no one's minds. And the music of the era is everywhere, from the Wu-Tang Clan to Seal's "Kiss From A Rose."

    Though there have been many comparisons to Larry Clark's iconic 1995 movie "Kids" when talking about "mid90s," in actuality this is the anti-"Kids" movie. Though both look at young kids in a don't give an f--- culture, Hill sets his apart by making it so inclusive. His characters just want to have a good time.

    It's one of those rare stories these days that looks at the beauty of life, rather than the parts that suck.

     

    SEE ALSO: 24 movies coming out soon that are major Oscar contenders

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    hillary and bill clinton

    • A former senior aide to the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, said there was a "not zero" chance she could throw her hat in the ring to run for president a third time.
    • After mostly staying out of the political fray since her loss in 2016, Clinton has begun to reemerge — but not everyone in the Democratic Party is happy about it.
    • Some argue that while the Clintons are adept fundraisers, the mixed perceptions of them among the party and their decades of political baggage are hurting Democrats.

    A former aide to the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, said there was a "not zero" chance she could throw her hat in the ring a third time in 2020.

    Philippe Reines, Clinton's former senior adviser and deputy secretary of state for strategic communications, told Politico in an interview published Friday that just because Clinton had lost twice before didn't mean she should be counted out for 2020.

    "It's curious why Hillary Clinton's name isn't in the mix — either conversationally or in formal polling — as a 2020 candidate," he said.

    "She's younger than Donald Trump by a year. She's younger than Joe Biden by four years. Is it that she's run before? This would be Bernie Sanders' second time, and Biden's third time," he added. "Is it lack of support? She had 65 million people vote for her."

    After mostly staying out of the political fray since her 2016 loss, Clinton has become more active on social media and is reaching out to White House reporters to repair her contentious relationship with the press, according to Politico. She is also set to kick off a speaking tour with her husband.

    But some Democrats see Clinton's reemergence on the political stage as a nuisance rather than a boon for the party. They say that the Clintons' complicated legacy and combined political baggage have polarized many in the party and made them easy targets for Republican attacks. 

    Clinton raised eyebrows in a recent interview with CBS when she said her husband's affair with Monica Lewinsky while she was a White House intern was not an abuse of power, prompting ire from fellow Democrats who said she distracted from the party's midterm message.

    Republicans, on the other hand, seem confident they could defeat Clinton again. In response to the speculation that Clinton could run a third time, the White House press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, sarcastically tweeted, "Christmas coming early this year?"

    But Reines said Clinton's fundraising prowess and decades of experience fighting tough battles shouldn't be taken for granted.

    "Chalking the loss up to her being a failed candidate is an oversimplification," he said. "She is smarter than most, tougher than most, she could raise money easier than most, and it was an absolute fight to the death."

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    Working Late Messy Desk

    • Having a cluttered desk or inappropriate items in your workspace could be making a bad impression on your colleagues or employers. 
    • Here are 12 things on your work desk that are making you look unprofessional. 

     

    Some people would argue that a messy desk is a sign of genius — and actual geniuses like Albert Einstein and Steve Jobs would seem to be among them.

    Others, like the people who actually work with and beside you, might find your mess less than endearing.

    And beyond clutter, items that are varying degrees of inappropriate and downright disgusting are among the biggest workplace offenders, according to the human resources professionals we interviewed.

    Here are a dozen desk “don’ts” that make you look less than professional. 

    SEE ALSO: 6 things you should always keep at your desk

    1. An avalanche of dishes and Tupperware

    Bringing your lunch to work is commendable. But leaving a week’s worth of crusted-over food containers and half of a mug collection in your workspace is atrocious.

    “Keeping a lot of items you use for eating scattered all over your desk shows a lack of time management and a lack of respect for your coworkers and the shared office space,” said Jodi Barbarino, a director of HR and recruitment in Miami.



    2. A swarm of sticky notes

    In a 2017 survey conducted by the staffing firm OfficeTeam, more than half of the senior managers interviewed for it said that “having a messy or disorganized workspace” was the “most distracting or annoying” thing about employees’ work areas. And one of the easiest ways to create visual insanity is to accumulate so many sticky notes that you can barely see the surface of your desk anymore.

    A better strategy: invest in a portable notebook and pen you love, so you’ll use them all the time to keep all your important reminders in one place.



    3. Suggestive pictures or calendars

    You wouldn’t need to decorate your cubicle with explicit images in order to be inappropriate in the eyes of your managers and colleagues. Barbarino said to second guess anything remotely sexy or suggestive.

    “Even if they’re cartoon images, they can be very offensive, and if sexual in nature it could be treated as sexual harassment,” she said. Yes, that even includes pictures of yourself scantily clad, say, at the beach.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    donald trump

    • The White House Correspondents' Association accused President Donald Trump in a statement of "cheerleading for a violent act targeting a free and independent news media."
    • On Thursday, Trump praised Republican Rep. Greg Gianforte at a Montana rally for body-slamming a Guardian reporter in May 2017.
    • "I said, 'Oh, this is terrible. He's going to lose the election," Trump said. "Then I said, 'Well, wait a minute. I know Montana pretty well — I think it might help him.' And it did."

    The White House Correspondents' Association sharply condemned President Donald Trump's praise of a lawmaker who assaulted a journalist in 2017, accusing Trump of "cheerleading for a violent act targeting a free and independent news media."

    "All Americans should recoil from the president's praise for a violent assault on a reporter doing his Constitutionally protected job," WHCA President Olivier Knox said in a statement. "This amounts to the celebration of a crime by someone sworn to uphold our laws and an attack on the First Amendment by someone who has solemnly pledged to defend it."

    Trump had praised Republican Rep. Greg Gianforte during a Montana rally on Thursday, calling him "my guy" for body-slamming Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs during his campaign.

    "And by the way, never wrestle him, you understand that? Never," Trump told the audience. "Any guy that can do a body slam, he's my guy."

    Trump also recounted his own reaction when he heard about Gianforte's assault.

    "I said, 'Oh, this is terrible. He's going to lose the election," Trump said. "Then I said, 'Well, wait a minute. I know Montana pretty well — I think it might help him.' And it did."

    Jacobs had made an audio recording of the May 2017 assault, and three Fox News reporters witnessed the attack. Jacobs could be heard in the recording trying to ask Gianforte a question about his position on a Republican healthcare bill before a scuffle ensued.

    "You just body slammed me and broke my glasses," Jacobs could be heard saying.

    Gianforte eventually pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault and was sentenced to 40 hours of community service and 20 hours of anger-management classes.

    Jacobs' employer, The Guardian, also condemned Trump's praise of Gianforte on Thursday.

    "To celebrate an attack on a journalist who was simply doing his job is an attack on the First Amendment by someone who has taken an oath to defend it."

    Bryan Logan contributed reporting.

    SEE ALSO: Trump joked about a reporter getting body-slammed as the world waits to hear about the fate of missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi

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