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The latest news from Life

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    Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi

    • Democratic leadership is warning the president not to fire Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein following a bombshell New York Times report on Friday.
    • According to The Times, Rosenstein discussed wearing a wire to secretly record the president and using the 25th Amendment to remove him from office. He denied the report.
    • "This story must not be used as a pretext for the corrupt purpose of firing Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein in order install an official who will allow the president to interfere with the Special Counsel's investigation," Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said.

    Democratic leadership is warning the president not to fire Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein following a Friday New York Times report that Rosenstein had discussed wearing a wire to secretly record the president and using the 25th Amendment to remove him from office.

    "This story must not be used as a pretext for the corrupt purpose of firing Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein in order install an official who will allow the president to interfere with the Special Counsel's investigation," Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said on Friday, shortly after the story's publication.

    Immediately following the story's publication, some of Trump's favorite far-right influencers, including Fox News hosts Laura Ingraham and Jeanine Pirro, called for Rosenstein's immediate firing. Other Republicans, including lawmakers in Washington, urged caution and discouraged the president from taking the report seriously.

    "When it comes to President @realDonaldTrump..... BEWARE of anything coming out of the @nytimes," Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham tweeted.

    Trump has regularly targeted both Rosenstein and Attorney General Jeff Sessions since the special counsel Robert Mueller was first tapped last May to oversee the FBI's investigation into possible collusion between the Russian government and the Trump campaign, as well as possible obstruction of justice committed by the president when he fired FBI Director James Comey last year.

    In justifying firing Comey, Trump cited a memo Rosenstein wrote that criticized Comey's handling of the Hillary Clinton email investigation — a move that reportedly made Rosenstein believe Trump had "used" him.

    Democrats have for months warned Trump against firing Rosenstein, and have developed a contingency plan to protect the Russia investigation should the president do so, which would include calling for obstruction of justice hearings and a special congressional committee to replace the special counsel investigation.

    Rosenstein first raised the question of the 25th amendment and considered wearing a wire in the spring of 2017, The Times said, citing sources in the Department of Justice and FBI who were present in conversations with Rosenstein or were briefed on memos that former Deputy Director Andrew McCabe wrote about Rosenstein.

    But the Washington Post later reported that Rosenstein's comment about wearing a wire was made sarcastically, after McCabe pushed for the DOJ to investigate Trump.

    Rosenstein issued a broad denial of the Times' reporting, calling the story "inaccurate and factually incorrect," and said in a statement to the Times that, based on his "personal dealings" with the president, there is no basis to remove him from office.

    Rosenstein also claimed that the anonymous sources cited in the story are motivated by anti-DOJ sentiment and their own "personal agenda." 

    Sonam Sheth and Grace Panetta contributed to this report. 

    SEE ALSO: Trump says Kavanaugh is 'under assault,' blames Christine Blasey Ford for not going to the FBI when she was in high school

    DON'T MISS: Trump's media allies are pushing him to fire Rod Rosenstein 'immediately' after the bombshell New York Times story

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    patti davis

    • Patti Davis, the daughter of former President Ronald Reagan, wrote in a Washington Post op-ed Friday that she was sexually assaulted decades ago and forgets certain details — just like Christine Blasey Ford.
    • Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her roughly 36 years ago at a high school party, though she doesn't remember the precise date or location of the alleged attack.
    • "Your memory snaps photos of the details that will haunt you forever, that will change your life and live under your skin," Davis wrote. "It blacks out other parts of the story that really don't matter much."


    Patti Davis, the daughter of former President Ronald Reagan, described in a Washington Post op-ed her own sexual assault 40 years ago, and why she remembers certain details perfectly, and others not at all.

    Her revelation comes amid a national debate over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and how to handle a decades-old allegation that he sexually assaulted Christine Blasey Ford when the two were in high school.

    The Senate Judiciary Committee, which is responsible for confirming Kavanaugh to the bench, is arranging for both Kavanaugh and Ford to testify next week. But the process has triggered controversy, as Republican senators have shot down Ford's requests to delay the hearing and allow for an FBI investigation into her allegations first.

    Davis wrote in her op-ed that she was sexually assaulted roughly 40 years ago by a "prominent music executive" in his office, as she attempted to play a cassette tape of her material. Like Ford, she says she told no one for decades.

    Beyond that, Davis said she has no recollection of certain details, including what the executive said about her songs, whether they spoke before she left his office, or even which month it was.

    But she said she does remember details like the dark green carpet of the executive's office and the sound of his footsteps as he approached her. She added that she recalls the smell of coffee and stale bread on his breath, and the sounds the leather couch made as it stuck to her skin during the attack.

    "It doesn't surprise me one bit that for more than 30 years, Christine Blasey Ford didn't talk about the assault she remembers," Davis wrote, noting that Ford has been criticized for forgetting the precise location and date of the party at which she says the assault took place.

    "That's what happens: Your memory snaps photos of the details that will haunt you forever, that will change your life and live under your skin," Davis wrote. "It blacks out other parts of the story that really don't matter much."

    Ford's lawyer said Thursday that Ford is willing to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee next week. As of Friday afternoon, the hearing's terms were still under negotiation.

    Read Davis' full op-ed here »

    If you or someone you know has experienced sexual assault, visit RAINN or call the National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-4673.

    SEE ALSO: Trump says Kavanaugh is 'under assault,' blames Christine Blasey Ford for not going to the FBI when she was in high school

    DON'T MISS: Joe Biden says Christine Blasey Ford 'should be treated with respect', apologizes for the way he handled Anita Hill's testimony 27 years ago

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Gold food chicken wing

    • A Reddit user asked "What is a luxury item you would never buy, regardless of your ability to afford it?" Posted over two months ago, the thread has racked up 325 votes and 725 comments.
    • Answers varied from designer luggage to cosmetic surgery to private jets — but the top answer was gold-flaked food. 
    • Gold-flaked food is a trend in luxury dining, but is it worth the cost? Regular people on Reddit say no.

    If you have an unlimited flow of cash, you may consider elevating your meals by dousing your food with gold. Or maybe not. 

    A Reddit user asked, "What is a luxury item you would never buy, regardless of your ability to afford it?" Posted over two months ago, the thread has racked up 325 votes and 725 comments. Answers varied from designer luggage to cosmetic surgery to private jets — but the top answer was gold-flaked food. 

    User moonyowl wrote: "Any foodstuff that includes gold with the intent to ingest it. Just... why?"

    Gold-flaked food is a growing trend in luxury dining. Even Amazon sells a 150mg jar of edible gold for $35. But after it's applied to food in restaurants around the world, the cost skyrockets. 

    In May, FOOD INSIDER tried $1,000 worth of gold covered chicken wings at The Ainsworth in New York City. The restaurant collaborated with celebrity Jonathan Cheban, also known as foodgod on Instagram, to create the golden wings. INSIDER reported that the gold doesn't add any flavor — just glam and a price tag. 

    gold food chicken wings

    Another New York restaurant, Serendipity 3, holds several Guinness World Records for the most expensive gold-flaked food. The restaurant holds a record for the most expensive sundae, a $1,000 three-scoop delight topped with 23 karats of "edible gold leaf." If you're not in the mood for something sweet, you can get the gold grilled cheese for a less expensive $214. The restaurant has been on the trend for many years, once offering a gold-flaked hot chocolate for $25,000.

    In June, Serendipity 3 was recognized once again for selling the most expensive milkshake at $100 a pop — which, of course, is topped with gold flakes and comes in a Swarovski crystal dish. 

    gold food milkshake

    Gold-flaked food isn't just an American trend.

    A taco from Grand Velas Los Cabos Resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, costs $25,000 and includes Kobe beef, Almas Beluga caviar, and black truffle brie cheese served on a gold-infused corn tortilla. 

    Such a taco is what the Reddit community described as a total waste of money: "Let's take a normal food, and fill it with caviar, truffle oil, and gold leaf until it's unrecognizable. It'll cost a small fortune and taste like sh--, but who cares, vain rich folks will buy it anyways," wrote user lastPingStanding.

    If you prefer sweet over savory, you can pick up Manila Social Club's gold-flaked doughnut for $100, or $1,000 for a dozen. 

    If you don't agree with regulars on Reddit, give gold food a try — just make sure you can put your money where your mouth is. 

    SEE ALSO: A restaurant in NYC serves a $1,000 gold wings developed by a friend of the Kardashians

    SEE ALSO: Edible gold is a huge food trend — here are seven dishes you need to try

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: An aerospace company reintroduced its precision helicopter with two crossing motors


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    noel francisco

    • If President Donald Trump fires Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the Justice Department's rules of succession dictate that Solicitor General Noel Francisco would assume the post.
    • Francisco's track record as a lawyer mirrors Trump's rhetoric against intelligence authorities, with cases that include rebukes of the FBI and a defense of executive authority.

    Speculation is swirling that President Donald Trump might replace Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein after a New York Times report published on Friday alleged that the Justice Department head discussed using the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office.

    Trump has previously weighed firing Rosenstein, who oversees the special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 US election that has in part charged four Americans once affiliated with Trump's campaign or administration.

    Justice Department rules dictate that Solicitor General Noel Francisco, whose track record more closely aligns with Trump's ideas and grievances, would assume the post.

    Francisco served as White House counsel under George W. Bush and was a DOJ lawyer until 2005, when he joined Jones Day, where he worked with several future Trump appointees, including White House general counsel Don McGahn, who is expected to leave the Trump administration this fall, and took stances against various prosecutions of public officials.

    Trump infamously announced McGahn's pending departure on Twitter after a bombshell New York Times article in August reported McGahn had given over 30 hours of testimony in Mueller's probe. 

    Rosenstein appointed special counsel Robert Mueller in the investigation of foreign involvement in the 2016 US election. Since the beginning of the investigation, Trump has decried the investigation as a "witch hunt" and violation of authority.

    In a 2016 op-ed, Francisco took aim at then-FBI Director James Comey, who he said had acted in political interests by watering down an investigation of Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. In a case earlier this year with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Francisco reasserted Trump's constitutional ability to hire and fire almost all federal authorities.

    "The Constitution gives the president what the framers saw as the traditional means of ensuring accountability: the power to oversee executive officers through removal," Francisco wrote. "The president is accordingly authorized under our constitutional system to remove all principal officers, as well as all 'inferior officers' he has appointed."

    If appointed to Rosenstein's post, Francisco would have the potential authority to fire Mueller, an authority that has been widely debated but not officially agreed to, concerning whether or not it applies to Trump.

    Amid calls from conservative media, Democratic leadership raised their voices to discourage Trump from firing Rosenstein. The deputy attorney general has disputed the Times story that also alleged he had discussed wearing a wire to record the president.

    Democrats have reportedly developed a plan to insulate the Russia investigation from any personnel changes, zeroing in on obstruction of justice and protecting the integrity of the investigation.

    Francisco's potential commitment to Trump's political causes became a central issue in his confirmation hearings last year, when the Judiciary Committee's top Democrat Sen. Dianne Feinstein questioned his expressed support for Trump's travel ban and urged him in a letter to "publicly commit to refuse any order or request — whether express or implied — to interfere in the Special Counsel’s investigation."

    After two decades in the top legal circles in Washington, Francisco is an established presence that lawmakers have recognized could be elevated at any time because of Trump's unpredictable behavior.

    Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon told Business Insider last month he thought Francisco made for an ideal candidate to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

    "I think the solicitor general has done a pretty extraordinary job and is someone who will clearly be in the mix, but that's for the president to decide," Bannon said.

    SEE ALSO: Rod Rosenstein reportedly discussed invoking the 25th Amendment and wearing a wire to record his conversations with Trump

    DON'T MISS: Rod Rosenstein reportedly thought he could convince John Kelly and Jeff Sessions to invoke the 25th Amendment and remove Trump from office

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Screen Shot 2018 09 21 at 5.43.20 PM

    • Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas took aim at his Republican rival, Sen. Ted Cruz, and his ties to President Donald Trump.
    • During their first debate amid a closely watched midterm election in Texas, O'Rourke contrasted Cruz's recent conciliatory statements about Trump, with the harsh criticism he had for him when they were both candidates in the 2016 Republican primaries.
    • O'Rourke rebuked Cruz for aligning himself so closely with Trump, even as the president cozied up with Russian President Vladimir Putin.
    • "If the president attacks you personally ... how you respond is your business," O'Rourke said to Cruz. "But when the president attacks our institutions, this country, allows a foreign power to invade our democracy, that is our business."

    Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas took a verbal swing at his Republican rival, Sen. Ted Cruz, and his ties with President Donald Trump, during a debate on Friday, in the final weeks of a heated and closely watched midterm election in the state.

    Speaking at an auditorium at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, O'Rourke contrasted Cruz's recent conciliatory statements about Trump, and the harsh criticism Cruz had for Trump when they were both candidates in the 2016 Republican primary.

    Cruz at one time described the future Republican nominee as a "sniveling coward," "big loud New York bully," "pathological liar," and "utterly amoral."

    Since then, Cruz has turned a corner, showering praise on Trump after he took office, and describing him as a "flash-bang grenade thrown into Washington by the forgotten men and women of America," in a feature for TIME.

    Texans were "[wondering] where their junior senator is" as Trump "enters trade wars and imposes tariffs," O'Rourke said.

    "On that stage in Helsinki, as he defended Vladimir Putin instead of the United States of America, that was collusion in action," O'Rourke said, referring to Trump's July summit with Putin in Finland. Trump drew bipartisan backlash during the summit for failing to condemn Russia's meddling in the 2016 US presidential election and criticizing US intelligence officials.

    For his part, Cruz offered a tepid rebuke of Trump's Helsinki remarks, without mentioning his name: "I think we need to be acting vigorously to prevent Russian aggression," Cruz said in an interview with CNN. "And I think it's a mistake to be apologizing for Vladimir Putin."

    "If the president attacks you personally ... how you respond is your business," O'Rourke said to Cruz. "But when the president attacks our institutions, this country, allows a foreign power to invade our democracy, that is our business."

    O'Rourke added that he would be a candidate who would "stand up to this president, [and] where we must, work with him where we can."

    Cruz accused the Democratic Party was "just consumed with hatred for Donald Trump," and claiming O'Rourke's views were "extreme, and doesn't reflect Texas."

    Polls indicate the race in the traditionally Republican state is a toss-up. An independent Quinnipiac poll released Tuesday suggests Cruz leads O'Rourke by nine percentage points. A Reuters/Ipsos/UVA Center for Politics Poll on Wednesday put O'Rourke in the lead by two points.

    Trump endorsed Cruz's campaign and agreed to headline a rally in October: "I'm picking the biggest stadium in Texas we can find," Trump said in a tweet in August.

    SEE ALSO: 'You should be more worried about Paul Manafort meeting with Robert Mueller': John Kerry fends off Trump's attacks on his meeting with Iranian officials

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Christine Blasey Ford Brett Kavanaugh

    • Christine Blasey Ford's attorneys asked for more time to decide whether Ford will speak to the Senate Judiciary Committee about her claim that Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in the 1980s.
    • Committee chairman Chuck Grassley granted the request Friday night. He initially gave them until 10 p.m. ET Friday to respond, otherwise the committee would move to vote on Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court.
    • In a letter to the committee cited by CNN on Friday night, Ford's lawyer, Debra Katz, rebuked the committee for taking what she called a "cavalier" attitude toward "a sexual assault survivor who has been doing her best to cooperate with the Committee."
    • "Our modest request is that she be given an additional day to make her decision," Katz wrote.

    Christine Blasey Ford's attorneys say they need more time to decide whether Ford will speak to the Senate Judiciary Committee about her claim that Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in the 1980s.

    In a letter to the committee cited by CNN on Friday night, Ford's lawyer, Debra Katz, scolded the committee for taking what she called a "cavalier" attitude toward "a sexual assault survivor who has been doing her best to cooperate with the Committee."

    Committee chairman Chuck Grassley granted their request, and then fumed about it in a series of tweets late Friday night. He initially gave Ford's attorneys until Friday at 10 p.m. ET to respond to a request to have Ford testify to lawmakers. Ford's attorney said, "our modest request is that she be given an additional day to make decision."

    Ford has accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a high school party in the 1980s. Kavanaugh denies it. Ford's attorneys have also asked that the FBI investigate.

    Grassley proposed a Wednesday hearing, during which Ford can speak to senators on the committee and Kavanaugh can formally respond. The lawmakers initially floated a Monday hearing, but Ford's attorneys pushed back.

    The back-and-forth has exasperated some Republicans who are eager to confirm Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court and notch another victory for President Donald Trump ahead of the November midterm elections. Kavanaugh is Trump's second nominee to the nation's high court.

    Trump earlier this week conceded that Ford's should have a chance to share her story in a Senate hearing, but then appeared to cast doubt on her claims Friday morning.

    Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the ranking member on the Judiciary Committee had some words for her colleagues Friday night, accusing them of "bullying a survivor of attempted rape in order to confirm a nominee."

    Feinstein called their actions "an abuse of power."

    "Republicans are turning a blind eye to her story. First they announced a hearing before inviting her, now they're ignoring her willingness to cooperate," Feinstein said.

    "Brett Kavanaugh could serve on the court for 40 years, what’s another 24 hours to make sure we get this right?"

    SEE ALSO: Chuck Grassley fumes about the Christine Blasey Ford-Brett Kavanaugh saga in a series of bizarre tweets

    DON'T MISS: Christine Blasey Ford begins negotiations with the Senate over her testimony about sexual-assault allegations against Brett Kavanaugh

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Chuck Grassley

    • Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Chuck Grassley granted Christine Blasey Ford's attorneys an extension to decide whether she'll speak to lawmakers about her claim that Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were in high school in the 1980s.
    • Ford's attorneys sent a letter to the committee on Friday ahead of an initial 10 p.m. ET deadline to ask for more time. The lawyer, Debra Katz, also scolded the senators for displaying what she called a "cavalier" attitude toward a "sexual assault survivor."
    • After granting the extension, Grassley appeared to fume about it on Twitter, and seemed to apologize to Kavanaugh, who is waiting for the senators to vote on his confirmation to the Supreme Court.

    Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Chuck Grassley appeared to fume on Friday night about his decision to grant Christine Blasey Ford's attorneys request for more time to decide whether she'll speak to lawmakers about her claim that Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her decades ago.

    Ford's attorneys sent a letter to the committee on Friday ahead of an initial 10 p.m. ET deadline to ask for more time. The lawyer, Debra Katz, scolded the senators for displaying what she called a "cavalier" attitude toward a "sexual assault survivor."

    "Our modest request is that she be given an additional day to make her decision," Katz wrote, according to CNN.

    After granting the extension, Grassley seemed to grumble about it in a series of tweets:

    "Five times now we hv granted extension for Dr Ford to decide if she wants to proceed w her desire stated one wk ago that she wants to tell senate her story Dr Ford if u changed ur mind say so so we can move on I want to hear ur testimony. Come to us or we to u."

    Grassley continued, this time addressing Kavanaugh: "Judge Kavanaugh I just granted another extension to Dr Ford to decide if she wants to proceed w the statement she made last week to testify to the senate She shld decide so we can move on I want to hear her. I hope u understand. It’s not my normal approach to b indecisive."

    Observers began to question whether Grassley actually meant to send a text or private message. Others noted Grassley's language implied that the committee is not genuinely interested in Ford's story.

    "If you actually thought that Republicans on the Senate Judiciary were planning to give Christine Blasey Ford a fair hearing, joke's on you, I guess," Rolling Stone writer Jamil Smith said.

    In a final tweet Friday night, Grassley fumed a bit more, while evoking Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer's name:

    "With all the extensions we give Dr Ford to decide if she still wants to testify to the Senate I feel like I’m playing 2nd trombone in the judiciary orchestra and Schumer is the conductor."

    The back-and-forth has exasperated some Republicans who are eager to confirm Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court and notch another victory for President Donald Trump ahead of the November midterm elections. Kavanaugh is Trump's second nominee to the bench.

    SEE ALSO: Republicans grant Christine Blasey Ford's request for more time to decide whether she'll testify on sexual assault claim against Brett Kavanaugh

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Tim Gosar David Brill ad

    • Republican congressman Paul Gosar has six siblings who do not want him to keep his seat in Arizona's 4th District this November.
    • They endorsed Gosar's Democratic opponent, David Brill, in a campaign ad posted online Friday.
    • In the ad, Gosar's siblings remarked about their brother's positions on health care, immigration, and the environment. "He's not listening to you, and he doesn't have your interests at heart," Tim Gosar said.

    Six siblings of Arizona Republican representative Paul Gosar appeared in a campaign ad endorsing his Democratic opponent, David Brill.

    Video of the ad made the rounds online Friday night. In it, Tim, David, Grace, Joan, Gaston, and Jennifer Gosar each gave their own takes on why they believe Paul Gosar is unfit to keep the 4th District seat he has held since 2013. They also remarked about their brother's positions on health care, immigration, and the environment.

    "If [voters] care about health care, their children's' health care, they would hold him to account," Grace Gosar said.

    "If he actually cared about people in rural Arizona, I bet he'd be fighting for Social Security, for better access to health care," Jennifer Gosar said. "I bet he would be researching what is the most insightful water policy to help the environment of Arizona sustain itself and be successful."

    Tim Gosar made the final pitch: "He's not listening to you, and he doesn't have your interests at heart."

    Watch the ad here:

    In an October 2017 interview with the Phoenix New Times, David Gosar had harsher words for his politician brother, scolding him at the time for amplifying conspiracy theories about the white-supremacist rally that year in Charlottesville, Virginia.

    "There's no dispute about our opposition to him," Gosar said. "It's something that has been building for some time. Watching what he does up there in Congress. It's ridiculous."

    David Brill is seen as a long shot candidate in the Arizona 4th District race. He told the Phoenix New Times he is grateful for the Gosar family's support, calling them "upstanding, wonderful people."

    Videographers from Brill's campaign interviewed Gosar's siblings, but Brill said he was not personally involved with the ad, or the siblings' remarks.

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Inside the Trump 'MAGA' hat factory


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    Jade Mountain Saint Lucia 37

    The super-rich are no longer just spending their money on private jets, yachts, and hotels — they're also splashing out on second passports.

    The Second Citizenship Survey 2017 from CS Global Partners found that 89% of people would like to own a second passport, and over 34% said they had looked into investing in a second citizenship.

    Even more striking were the 80% who said they would be willing to invest or donate 5% of their annual salary for a second citizenship — more than they spend on monthly rent.

    Luckily, a number of countries offer Citizenship by Investment (CIP) programs where money — normally invested in real estate — can actually buy a second passport, and the elite status that comes along with owning citizenship in another country.

    Other programs offer "elite residency" — an extended visa with perks — in exchange for similar investments.

    Nuri Katz, President of Apex Capital Partners, an international advisory firm that specialises in CIPs, told Business Insider: "For a lot of wealthy people having a second or third passport is important for the ability to travel. For some it's also a status symbol, like buying a fancy car to show your friends."

    He added that along with the travel benefits and the status that comes along with owning real estate around the world, the programs also allow people to manage their tax burdens.

    "Second citizenship is becoming more than just getting a passport," he said. "There are certain advantages towards using second citizenship to create residence in countries where tax burdens would be lower than where you are at the current time."

    However, Katz explained there's a difference between CIPs and residency programs.

    "Citizenship is forever, and cannot be taken away unless you received it under fraudulent circumstances," he said. "You also get a passport."

    Meanwhile, as laws change, a residency visa can be taken away — but it's a more affordable way to get the perks that come along with living in another country.

    In order to put together a complete list of countries that offer citizenship or residency by investment, along with advice from Katz, Business Insider consulted the latest CBI Index, published by the Financial Times' PWM magazine, and spoke to global investment migration firm Henley & Partners and global citizenship and residence planning company Knightsbridge Capital Partners.

    Whether you choose to splash out for full citizenship or you invest in residency, here are 23 countries where money can buy you a second passport — or at least a chance to live long-term abroad — ranked by cost, from cheapest to most expensive.

    23. Thailand — 'Elite residency' from THB 500,000 ($15,253 or £11,793).

    The Thai government offers "elite" residency visas for wealthy foreign citizens, allowing them to live in the country for around $3,000 a year.

    There are seven different packages, with the most expensive being the "Elite Ultimate Privilege" scheme for $60,000 for 20 years of residency.

    Here are the three most popular options, according to Henley & Partners:

    Elite Easy Access

    • Five-year residence visa for the one-time fee of THB 500,000 ($15,253)

    Elite Family Excursion

    • A five-year visa for two people, for a one-time fee of THB 800,000 ($24,405), plus an additional charge of THB 300,000 ($9,152) per dependent.

    Elite Superiority Extension/Elite Ultimate Privilege

    • 20-year residence visa for a one-time fee of THB 2.14 million ($65,283)
      -Package includes complimentary VIP privileges such as government concierge services and airport services


    22. Latvia — Residency from €64,600 (£58,318 or $74,973).

    For residency in Latvia, here's what's required:

    • A minimum of €286,000 ($333,064 or £257,472) over a period of five years in a credit institution, or;
    • To invest in equity capital, the foreign national must invest a minimum of €36,000 ($41,924 or £32,409) and must pay a minimum of €28,600 ($33,306 or £25,747) in the next year.

    Henley & Partners added that there are also options to apply for the residence permit through the purchase of real estate or interest-free government bonds.

    You can apply for citizenship after five years through process of naturalization (i.e. language test, history test), according to Katz.

    "The true catch here is when they want to get citizenship, they have to take a language test, and Latvian is an impossible language to learn as an adult," Katz said.

    "No one can, and they know it, and as such they know no one will ever become a citizen."



    =19. Saint Lucia — Citizenship from $100,000 (£77,786).

    There are three ways to get citizenship in Saint Lucia, according to Katz:

    • A donation of at least $100,000 (£77,113) to the Saint Lucia National Economic Fund (depending on number of dependents), or;
    • Investment of at least $300,000 (£231,517) in an approved real estate development, or;
    • Investment of $3.5 million (£2.7 million) in an approved enterprise project.


    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    abandoned Pripyat amusement park ukraine

    • Some of the most expensive structures ever built now sit empty.
    • A luxury resort in Croatia, Olympic venues in Brazil, and an airport in Greece are just a few of these pricey constructions that are now deserted. 
    • These places became abandoned for various reasons, ranging from mismanagement and financial troubles to nuclear disasters.

     

    Around the world, massive structures that likely cost millions to build, including amusement parks, airports, resorts, and Olympic arenas, now sit abandoned.

    From Olympic venues in Brazil to an amusement park that was meant to be the largest in Asia, these constructions were abandoned due to financial woes, mismanagement, war, or even nuclear disaster.

    Here's a look at some of the most expensive structures ever built that now sit empty, many of them in ruins.

    SEE ALSO: 10 abandoned mansions around the world that likely used to be worth millions

    The Hellenikon International Airport in Greece used to be Athens' main airport, serving over 12 million passengers a year.

    Source: Business Insider



    But the airport closed in 2001 after being replaced by Athens International Airport, and it has sat abandoned ever since.

    Source: Business Insider



    Several plans to redevelop the airport have faltered. But a development group recently promised to start transforming the site into a metropolitan park starting in 2019, which will include residential areas, hotels, shopping centers, theme parks, museums, sports facilities, and more.

    Source: Greek Travel Pages



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Israel News AymanOdeh Arab (8 of 29)

    • I spent a month in Israel talking to Arab-Israeli leaders during one of the tensest summers in years — and they described dire poverty, increasing tensions, and laws they see as "outright racism."
    • Chief among the Arab leaders I met with was Ayman Odeh, leader of the Israeli parliament's third-largest bloc.
    • He has been likened to Martin Luther King Jr. by those sympathetic to his cause and a terrorist by Israel's ultranationalist defense minister.
    • Arabs, who make up 21% of Israel's population, suffer a litany of issues, from rampant crime and poverty to health, which Arab leaders say comes from decades of neglect from the Israeli government.

    The soldier stepped forward and looked down the hill. Fingering his assault rifle, he called to me, first in Hebrew, then, upon seeing my confusion, in English.

    I was walking up a narrow path at the edge of Sacher Park, the largest public park in Jerusalem and one that borders both the Knesset, Israel's Parliament, and the Supreme Court. Tall willowy cypresses stood sentinel on one side of the path, a cascading metal fence on the other.

    When I reached the point where the path met the Knesset service road, the soldier, athletic and younger than me, pointed at my camera. "What were you talking a photo of?"

    "The fence," I said. He seemed confused.

    "Do you know what you were taking a photo of?" he said.

    In Israel, a fence is never just a fence.

    "It looked pretty in the morning light," I said, trailing off, aware of my frivolousness in a country conditioned by violence and tension. I held out the camera and offered to delete the photo.

    He took my passport and questioned my intentions. I had a meeting at the Knesset, I told him. With Ayman Odeh, I added.

    Odeh is the Arab leader of the parliament's third-largest bloc, four Arab parties known collectively as the Joint List. He is likened to Martin Luther King Jr. by those sympathetic to his cause and a terrorist by Israel's ultranationalist defense minister.

    He is, in many ways, the first Arab leader of his kind in Israel. Whereas previous Arab or Palestinian leaders gained prominence through force of personality or association with the Palestinian struggle, Odeh has become one of the country's most high-profile politicians because he was elected to such a prominent position.

    Israel News AymanOdeh Arab (4 of 29)

    "The fact that the third-largest party in the Israeli Parliament is a Palestinian front is extremely significant," Orly Noy, a leftist Iranian-Jewish political activist and journalist, had told me. "Just by existing it has had an impact on Israeli politics."

    I tried to see if Odeh's name registered any response, but the soldier's eyes looked askance at the service road. He asked a few more questions. I deleted the photo. The soldier flicked his head, his eyes fixed on the road. "Go."

    As I shuffled the quarter-mile to the Knesset, I kept asking myself a question that, as an American, has become almost reflexive after an interaction with authority: "What would that've been like if I wasn't white?" In Israel, the question is similar but tailored to the region: "What would that have been like if I was Arab?" "If I was Palestinian?"

    Arab-Israeli society is rife with issues, from crime to poverty to health

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    It's not a flippant question.

    Many of the issues that plague Israel's Arab community parallel those faced by minorities in the US. Arabs, who make up 21% of Israel, have a lower life expectancy than Jews, a higher infant-mortality rate, worse infrastructure services, and lower incomes, particularly among those with higher education. Nearly 50% of Arab-Israelis fall below the poverty line, compared to 13% of Jews, according to the most recent report, though that number is an improvement over recent years.

    The problem of crime and violence is particularly entrenched. A recent study conducted by the Knesset Research and Information Center found that 64% of murder victims over the past three years were Arabs, and 95% of all shooting incidents were related to the Arab population.

    In the months leading up to my visit to Israel, in July, the country had been rife with tension, as it always seems to be.

    Bloody protests in Gaza commemorating the 60th anniversary of the Nakba, the Arabic word for "catastrophe" — what Palestinians call the Israeli War of Independence and subsequent exodus of 700,000 Palestinian Arabs — and the move of the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem had, in turn, sparked protests in Arab-Israeli communities over the Israeli army's conduct during the protests. In Haifa, protests turned into clashes with police and left protesters bloodied or arrested.

    In June, the Jewish residents of the northern town of Afula protested the sale of a home to an  Arab family, with the former mayor saying they "don't want a mixed but rather a Jewish city, and it's their right. This is not racism."

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    The news in Israel is always full of headlines on protests, clashes, foiled attacks, stabbings, and incidents between Arab-Israelis and police where fault is, it seems, in the eye of the beholder.

    But it goes beyond that. As the Israeli novelist Iris Leal wrote in May, "Israel's Arabs know they're second-class citizens and the most hated group in Israel."

    These things weighed on my mind as I passed through the successive security checks in an outer gatehouse that manages who goes into the Knesset: metal detector, passport check, X-ray machine.

    After I put my backpack through the X-ray machine, an officer took it aside and slowly dismantled every item inside, swabbing it methodically for bomb residue and passing each piece back through the X-ray.

    Matan Cohen, a goateed Israeli doctoral student at Columbia University, in New York, who serves intermittently as Odeh's foreign-policy adviser, smiled sheepishly as he waited for me, as if to say, This is what it is.

    We hurried down the path toward the Knesset, a squat rectangular building that looks more like a university library than a hall of power.

    Odeh invited me to the parliament to attend a special event on the problem of crime and violence plaguing Arab-Israeli society. Arab-rights activists, professors, police bigwigs, and Arab families of victims, among others, attended. Most of the Knesset members present were from the Joint List and the Zionist Union, the center-left opposition bloc.

    The atmosphere reminded me of a family reunion. Everyone seemed to know everyone else, and this contrasted with the grave issues being discussed.

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    Israel News AymanOdeh Arab (1 of 29)

    With Odeh busy running from committee room to committee room, Cohen, the foreign-policy adviser, played the part of tour guide and translator, stopping every so often to say hello to a leftist or Arab activist or staffer he knew.

    We sat in Odeh's office, where posters of Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, and the Freedom Charter of the African National Congress hung on the walls. Cohen expounded on the state of Israeli politics, the economic effects of what he sees as de-facto segregation between Arabs and Jews, the shifting tilt of the Supreme Court — a "fig leaf" on Israeli democracy, he said — and the way Israel's "balancing act" between being a Jewish and democratic state creates problems.

    His views are not Odeh's — Odeh complains Cohen is too pessimistic — but he is one of Odeh's chief advisers. When Cohen was an undergraduate at Hampshire College in Massachusetts, he spearheaded a successful campaign to get the school to divest from Israel. He said that, at 17, Israeli forces shot him in the eye during a demonstration against the 285-mile separation barrier built in the early 2000s to separate the West Bank from Israel.

    "Whoever is more blatant, more discriminatory, more racist gets the votes," Cohen said of the state of Israeli politics today. "It's an uphill battle."

    The political drift in Israel is moving further and further right

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    It's impossible to talk about the Joint List, Odeh, or Arab society without outlining the state of Israel's politics.

    Perhaps no politician has proved more adept at navigating Israel's parliamentary system, its tenuous alliances, and nonstop wheeling and dealing than Benjamin Netanyahu. "King Bibi" has held power for nine years and counting, longer than any prime minister since David Ben-Gurion, Israel's founding father.

    He and his conservative Likud Party have won with a simple formula: a vice-like grip on its base, fear-based appeals about national security, and, with each successive government, a growing reliance on nationalist, right-wing, and ultra-Orthodox parties.

    Netanyahu and his allies have frequently played up anti-Arab sentiment to curry electoral favor with the far right. On Election Day 2015, with Likud failing in the polls, Netanyahu said Arab voters were showing up at polling stations "in droves" to drive turnout of his base. It worked.

    The collapse of Syria, the rise of ISIS, and the threat of a nuclear Iran have pushed Israel's politics to become dominated by national security — even more so than in the past. That tilt favors Likud since many Israelis see the left as weak.

    Labor, the main center-left party, was in power during the first and second intifadas, the Palestinian uprisings against Israel's occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, which coincided with a wave of terror attacks.

    At this point, the left has dwindled to 8% of the public, according to those surveyed in a 2016 Pew Research poll. In that poll, the right had swelled to 35% and 55% were in the center. But ideas that were once fringe have become mainstream. The same poll found that nearly half of the Jewish Israelis surveyed said they supported the expulsion of Arabs from Israel.

    The effect is that left and center-left parties now try to appeal to right-wing voters, Noy, the leftist activist and journalist, told me.

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    In 2015, Isaac Herzog, then the leader of Labor, ran a campaign with ads advertising that he understood "the Arab mentality," that he saw Arabs through "the crosshairs" of a gun, and at one point referred to Palestinians as a demographic threat, saying: "I don't want 61 Palestinian MKs in Israel's Knesset. I don't want a Palestinian prime minister."

    Throughout the years, Netanyahu has accused the left of having "forgotten what it means to be Jews." Last year, Avi Gabbay, Labor's current leader, unironically repeated the sentiment.

    The feeling among many left-wing Israelis, according to Tel Aviv University professor Aviad Kleinberg, is that if Gabbay represents the left, they might as well vote for the right.

    Israel's Arab Parliament members face an uphill battle to be heard

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    On the day I visited the Knesset — while Odeh and his cohort were holding an event to talk about how to improve the lives of impoverished and violence-weary Arab-Israeli citizens — the ruling coalition was holding a joint-committee session debating the so-called Nation-State bill.

    Introduced in 2011 and debated sporadically in the years since, the bill was written as one of Israel's "Basic Laws," which collectively act as the de-facto constitution. The bill's apparent purpose is to set in stone the state's Jewish character, but critics decried the bill as "discriminatory," extreme nationalism, and "racist."

    The most contentious clause declared that "the State may allow a community, including followers of a single religion or members of a single nationality, to establish a separate communal settlement." Many suggested the bill as written could legalize segregation. One far-right Knesset member argued that the clause was necessary to push more Jews into areas dominated by Arabs.

    The bill was far from the only piece of controversial legislation the ruling coalition was attempting to push through before the summer recess in 10 days. Perhaps then it was understandable why Aida Touma-Sliman, a quick-witted Arab-Israeli lawmaker, feminist activist, and member of the Joint List, seemed exhausted when I met her in the Knesset cafeteria, a room ostensibly for members' only but rarely enforced. As we ate vegetarian sandwiches after a long day of meetings, she told me she'd been up nearly until dawn that day sitting through committee votes.

    When I asked her how she saw the Joint List in the political climate, her once jovial demeanor disappeared. "If anybody thinks that now is the time to lead huge initiatives related to the rights of any citizen or human being in this country, I think we have an illusion," she told me. "We are in a situation where we are trying to defend our community. We are in a defensive strategy more than anything else, because we are really that threatened."

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    One of the most prominent feminist activists in Israel, a 2007 Nobel Peace Prize nominee, and a former journalist, Touma-Sliman does not suffer fools lightly. When I asked her what Odeh was like in his younger years — the two have known each other since he was in his 20s, and she refers to him as her "comrade" — she cut off the line of questioning. The political predicament doesn't have time for nostalgic reminisces.

    I asked whether Arab-Israeli MKs have raised the issue of violence in Arab society before.

    "One of the big lies in the Israeli media and the government is that we do not deal with the everyday rights and lives of our constituency," she said, and instead are too focused on solving the Palestinian question — the peace process, a two-state solution, conditions in the West Bank and Gaza.

    "We've been talking about the crime [in Arab society] for years now. The government didn't want to do anything and they didn't do anything. Then, when they wanted to deal with it, they blame us for it."

    Later in the day, Odeh gave a speech in front of the Knesset saying, "There is an unacceptable gap … between the declarations and the head nods on the importance of dealing with this phenomenon and the activity on the ground."

    Indeed, Arab-Israeli lawmakers have been sounding the alarm for close to a decade. In 2012 — three years before Touma-Sliman was elected — long-serving Arab-Israeli MK Ahmad Tibi held a special Knesset meeting to discuss the issue, which many felt had reached crisis levels. At the session, Netanyahu called the lives of Arab-Israelis "insufferable" and vowed to help solve the issue by integrating the communities into the economy and education system and increasing law-enforcement by earmarking $46 million for improvement plans.

    The issue came up again, in 2015, after a 100-page report detailed underfunding in nearly every facet of Arab public life, from policing to infrastructure. The report found that the per capita budget for residents of Arab towns was 10% less than residents of the poorest Jewish towns and as much as 45% less than wealthier ones.

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    Israel News AymanOdeh Arab (28 of 29)

    Shortly after, the government approved a $4.3 billion five-year plan, Resolution 922, to improve education, housing, and policing in Arab communities. About one-third of the money has been spent so far. Rather than specify the amounts of money used for programs, it directs government agencies to allocate 20% of their budget to minority populations. While Odeh and the Joint List were instrumental in negotiating the plan, other Joint List MKs and those in Arab civil society suggested the plan was a fraction of the funding needed to bring about real change.

    The government says it has seen improvements in the number of Arab students in higher education, and the rate of employment among Arab-Israelis. And some Arab mayors say they are feeling the positive effects on the ground. But many in Arab society say the situation with crime and violence has not improved and that much more needs to be done to bridge the massive gap that has built up over decades.

    Israel is riddled with impoverished, crime-ridden Arab villages and towns — and Jisr az-Zarqa is one of the hardest hit

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    In Jisr az-Zarqa, violence, poverty, and neglect have long been the norm. On a sunny Thursday morning, I drove with the Israeli human-rights activist Jafar Farah to the coastal Arab village, one of the poorest towns in Israel. It's prone to gang warfare, shootings, stabbings, and arson, and 80% of the 14,000 inhabitants live below the poverty line.

    Residents have complained of decades of police neglect — a police station for the village was opened for the first time in November — and said that when police are around, they treat residents as "a security threat or potential criminal." The distrust is bone-deep.

    Farah, who's 52 and has a head of curly gray-black hair, has devoted his life to improving the situation of Arabs in Israel. In 1997, he founded the Mossawa Center, in Haifa, a city long heralded as Israel's "model" city of Arab-Jewish coexistence.

    Farah winced as he shifted to get comfortable in his car seat. His leg had been in pain for months. In May, Farah was detained by police while he was looking for his son at a Gaza-solidarity protest. After seeing his son covered in blood at the police station, Farah demanded to know why. Farah said the officer's response was to kick him and break his knee. The Police Investigation Unit has opened a probe looking into the incident. The officer in question has been placed on administrative leave.

    We drove down Highway 2, the primary artery connecting Tel Aviv and Haifa. Farah pointed at a crowded expanse of gray cinderblock structures overlooking the highway. Though Jisr az-Zarqa abuts the highway, there's no exit. There were exits for the towns before and after. We drove farther south, doubled back on an interior road, and exited to a small two-lane access road that is the only way into the impoverished village. Farah told me to pull over. A police car was idling at the mouth of the road, stopping any car heading toward the highway.

    "I want to see how the police ... " he said, trailing off. His eyes were fixed on the officer talking to a man in a newish white sedan. "Policing is a big issue in the village."

    Farah has an acerbic sense of humor, honed after years of fighting what he sees as thinly veiled racist attacks on Arab communities. We drove through the one-lane tunnel that passes under Highway 2 and forms the entrance to Jisr. Farah pointed in each direction.

    To the east,he said, Jisr is bounded by the highway. To the south, Jisr is bounded by Caesarea, Netanyahu's hometown and a wealthy enclave of villas and private pools. An earthen embankment, nearly a mile long, 30-feet high, and 15-feet wide, was built more than a decade ago to separate the communities. Caesarea residents said they wanted to block the sound of the call to prayer from Jisr's mosques and to prevent thieves. Jisr residents see it as another example of official discrimination: a separation wall built so that wealthy Caesareans don't have to look at the dilapidated town.

    To the west there is the sea and the Nahal Taninim Nature Reserve, created in 2000 amid much consternation from Jisr's fishermen who used the lands and waters. To the north there's Ma'agan Michael, considered Israel's richest kibbutz, or collective community. The 1,400-person kibbutz covers a landmass five times that of Jisr, whose population density is more akin to Cairo than a fishing village. The town's mayor has estimated Jisr would need to double in size to properly accommodate its fast-growing population. Plans to add land to Jisr by moving the highway or from unused land near Caesarea or nearby Beit Hanania have been blocked by those communities.

    "The kibbutzim can't give back its agricultural lands, of course. Their fathers promised them those lands 3,000 years ago," Farah said with an acidic laugh as he looked out to Ma'agan Michael. "But, remember, they vote for Meretz," the social-democratic left-wing party.

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    Israel News AymanOdeh Arab (13 of 29)

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    The problems that plague Jisr are extensive and interconnected: a weak education system, high crime rates, a lack of public services, insufficient housing, and high rates of unemployment, particularly among men. The men in the town used to make a living fishing off the coast, but scarcity and increased restrictions from the state have pushed most out. Many families now rely on income from the town's women, who pile into shuttles at dawn every morning to take on menial jobs all over the country.

    The majority of Farah's advocacy in Jisr and other Arab communities is about basic services: In 2013, Mossawa successfully lobbied to have Jisr connected by public buses. Other recent successes include the building of an early childhood center and a building for the social welfare department. But the center and department will be housed in the same location. "Not good," Farah said, shaking his head.

    Sewage systems, water, and electricity are other major issues. Near the southern edge of the town, Farah showed me how squat houses alternated with unfinished multistory concrete structures and ramshackle houses were built on top of one another. The government won't approve permits for new buildings because of the proximity to Caesarea, Farah said, so residents build upward illegally. The houses are linked by looping green cables that carry electricity from one legal structure to half a dozen illegal ones, like a perverse game of telephone.

    "At a certain point, we need to be advocating for higher education and not for sewage systems, you know?" he said.

    We parked at the city-council building, which is a series of trailers. The new police station, opened in November, is next door. Residents weary of violence applauded the development, but there was frustration, Farah said, that the city council had asked unsuccessfully for years for a permanent structure. It still isn't built. At the government's direction, the police station was built on land that the town council had hoped to use for development.

    That day, Farah and the town council were due to show Emanuele Giaufret, the EU's ambassador to Israel, the progress made by an EU-funded, Mossawa-coordinated project to empower the town to "maximize the economic potential." One of the main plans, in the works for years, is to turn the village into a tourist destination. Its coastline is spectacular, and the thought is that it could become a beach town.

    After a short presentation, residents led Giaufret and the other attendees on a guided tour. We drove down a sand road to the coast, flanked by scrub plants and the Taninim Stream. The tour guide, a young Arab woman, pointed out the ruins of a stone bridge and explained that the town derives its name, which means "bridge over the blue," from the bridge built to commemorate Kaiser Wilhelm II's visit to Palestine, in 1898.

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    As we walked along Tel Taninim, an ancient hill overlooking a wild and untouched Mediterranean beach, one of the women on the tour fainted. Her son splashed water on her face. She woke up and fainted again. It was ascertained that she was diabetic and didn't have insulin with her. Others tried to shield her from the sun with a scarf. Marwa Zoubi, Mossawa's social and economic program coordinator, turned to me.

    "This is the problem: The closest ambulance has to come from Caesarea," she said. "Because the highway doesn't connect to Jisr, it is 20 minutes away. The closest hospital is in Hadera, 30 minutes away." Jisr has no hospital, no post office, no social-security office, no bank, and no ATM, she added. There's little land to add any of those things.

    Ten minutes passed before a lifeguard came from a nearby beach and administered first aid. Later, a paramedic showed up to take the woman away. The tour continued.

    When it ended, the ambassador met the town council in a community center. Farah gave a speech and pulled no punches.

    "I know it's not an easy time to be an ambassador to this country," Farah said as he leaned between the lectern and a crutch. "Your position is either you support us here or we become refugees in Europe. I hope to not become a refugee in Europe."

    A law passed that Arab-Israelis believe is the state saying 'Don't even dream that you will be equal'

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    What Farah was referring to was unmistakable. At 3 a.m. that morning, the Knesset passed the Nation-State Law after a contentious and dramatic eight-hour debate. 

    The decorum in the Knesset often strays from civil — fistfights, cursing, and shouting are all par for the course — and the debate over a bill one Joint List member called "the death of democracy" did not disappoint.

    Odeh waved a black flag from the podium, Joint List MKs Tibi and MK Touma-Sliman shouted at Netanyahu, "You passed an apartheid law, a racist law" — to which, Netanyahu shouted "How dare you talk this way about the only democracy in the Middle East?" Jamal Zahalka, also of the Joint List, ripped up a printed copy of the bill. In the end, the law was softened in response to the criticism. The "exclusive communities" clause was replaced with one stating that the state sees "developing Jewish settlement as a national interest." Another dropped clause would have instructed courts to use Jewish ritual law when no legal precedents existed.

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    Israel News AymanOdeh Arab (10 of 29)

    But the criticism was swift, strong, and widespread. The American Jewish Committee said the law puts at risk "the commitment of Israel's founders to build a country that is both Jewish and democratic." Major Israel-backers Jewish Federations of North America and the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews expressed concerns over discrimination.

    Eventually the EU joined the chorus. Mordechai Kremnitzer, a professor emeritus of the Faculty of law at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, wrote in the left-leaning daily Haaretz that the law "raises the overt, blunt discrimination to the constitutional level."

    There are some indications that Netanyahu's coalition many have miscalculated with the law. Tens of thousands of Druze, the Arab group that serves in the military and is frequently held up as something like a model minority, have come out to protest the law as promoting inequality. In response, Netanyahu convened a committee to handle the uproar from Druze and other minority groups. A number of petitions, including one by the Joint List, have been filed against the law in the courts.

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    Ben-Dror Yemini, a columnist for Yediot Ahronot, Israel's paper of record, told me the law was a "provocation" and "stupid" but not racist. "It's an unnecessary law, but not a racist law. We don't need this kind of law because it won't change anything," Yemini said.

    On that last point Farah agreed. But whereas Yemini believes that discrimination in Israel is no worse or better than other Western nations, Farah told me that discrimination against Arabs is already widespread. The Nation-State Law only codified it.

    In the case of the Arabic language, Farah said, it has never been treated as an official language. The Knesset does not offer translation in Arabic and laws aren't translated. Most public services offer little Arabic in their literature, websites, and signs. And as far as "exclusive communities," lots of Israeli towns and kibbutzes already have admission committees, which critics say allow towns to prevent Arabs from moving in.

    "If we would use ‘I have a dream,'" Farah told me, "the law is saying, ‘Don't even dream that you will be equal.'"

    The leader of the Arab-Israelis remains an unshakable optimist

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    Ayman Odeh is an optimist, almost unfailingly so. I met him a few days before the vote, at a popular Lebanese café in Haifa, where over a salad he tried to convince me that recent measures that Netanyahu's coalition put forth were a response to the growing strength of the Arab population.

    He rattled off stats: Arabs are now 18% of university students, 23% of students at the Technion (Israel's MIT), 16% of medical students, and Arabs in the medical field roughly equaled their proportion in society. And, besides, he said, this is the first Knesset in which Arabs hold 13 seats, the third-largest bloc.

    It's an encouraging notion, but one that belies some of the reality. Odeh's Joint List formed out of extreme circumstances. In 2014, the Knesset passed an election law that raised the vote threshold a party needed to be seated from 2% to 3.25%. It was no secret that some of the law's sponsors pushed the bill as a means to exclude Arab parties.

    The Arab parties, which have vastly divergent viewpoints ranging from an Islamist party to one with a Communist history, were forced to band together. An unprecedented 63.5% of Arabs came out to vote, up from 56% in 2013. But it's been difficult to keep the coalition together, as Odeh acknowledged, saying, "It's not easy to hug together a Communist and an Islamist with a liberal and a nationalist."

    And with the bloc's inability to pass laws in the face of Netanyahu's rightist coalition and the general rightward drift of the center-left opposition, it's anyone's guess if the upcoming election next year will generate the enthusiasm of 2015.

    Odeh seems unconcerned. Perhaps it is because his vision, by necessity, is wider than just the goings-on of the Knesset. Reading Malcolm X jump-started his political education. "There were times I had to stop reading to take a breath because I couldn't breathe," he told me. But lately, he has taken Martin Luther King Jr. as his north star.

    Odeh has become the de-facto leader of Arab society in Israel, a role he has taken to with gusto. When I met with Odeh, he had to stop the interview several times to speak with the family of an Arab child who had been kidnapped the previous day. He can be found frequently leading rallies and protests against Netanyahu and the ruling coalition in Tel Aviv, Haifa, and elsewhere.

    When Farah, the rights activist, was injured at the Gaza-solidarity protest in May, Odeh was on the news criticizing officers for what he saw as police brutality and suppression. He was eventually suspended from the Knesset for a week after lashing out at police officers at the hospital where Farah was being treated. His outspokenness has drawn vicious criticism from Netanyahu's most right-wing allies, like Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman, the founder of far-right Yisrael Beiteinu Party.

    "Every day that Ayman Odeh and his associates are free to walk around cursing at police officers is a failure of law enforcement authorities," Lieberman posted on Twitter at the time. "The place for these terrorists is not in the Knesset — it's in prison. It's time they pay a price for their actions."

    Odeh appears to be a new kind of Arab leader in Israel

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    One of the most contentious issues in Israel since the 1990s has been the eviction of Bedouin Arabs from the Negev Desert in the south and the West Bank. Nomadic Bedouins lived in the area long before the state formed, but after Israel's victory in the Six-Day War, in 1967, the state expropriated it as state land with the intention of establishing Jewish towns there. Bedouins established villages in the lands, built illegally since the government rarely approves permits for Arabs.

    Since 1948, Israel has established 700 towns and communities for Jews and fewer than 10 for Arabs, despite similar population growth, a statistic Arab-Israelis and leftists often cite as evidence of "apartheid."

    Recently, the Israeli army has issued dozens of orders to demolish Bedouin villages to make way for Jewish settlements. The Bedouins, the government has said, will be moved to new more modern homes; current Bedouin villages often lack electricity or running water. But Bedouins argue that the sites are inadequate. One site is next to a garbage dump, and there is little room for their animals to graze.

    Odeh has led the fight against the demolitions. Two weeks after the election of 2015, he led a 75-mile march from the Negev Desert to Jerusalem to call attention to the Bedouin issue. In January 2017, Odeh was at the forefront again. After a Supreme Court order, the government moved to demolish and evacuate the Bedouin village of Umm al-Hiran to make way for a Jewish town to be named, unironically, Hiran. Hundreds of armed police launched a predawn raid on the village while residents and activists — Odeh among them — attempted to stop the demolition.

    The day erupted in clashes, and a Bedouin-Israeli was shot by police while driving his car. The man lost control of his car and plowed into a policeman, killing him. The driver was fatally shot by police, who said they suspected a terrorist attack.

    Odeh was in the thick of it, attempting to get past police to the man's body. It ended with Odeh covered in pepper spray and, he alleges, shot in the head with a sponge-tipped bullet. Police said he was hit by an errant rock thrown by protesters. When I asked Odeh, given the current climate in the Knesset, whether he felt his activism was more important than his parliamentary work, Odeh pointed to the demolitions.

    "After that protest, we had a year with no demolitions of houses. I will happily be shot again if it will lead to another year of no demolitions," he said. "With respect to the parliamentary work, the public work is the one that, all across history, has made the changes in the world."

    In April, the residents Umm-Al-Hiran reached an agreement to voluntarily leave the village and move to a new development in Hura, a Bedouin town in the Negev Desert.

    Odeh told me that he wants to present a "moral alternative" to Israeli society based around equality. His goal is not just to energize Arab-Israelis, but to win over Jews, to pull the center of gravity away from the right wing.

    AYmanOdehUmmalHiran 6.JPG

    Almost to his detriment, Odeh has espoused a politics that is "soothing" to Jewish-Israelis and focused on coexistence, Noy, the leftist journalist, told me. In the current climate, she said, Jews are not that interested in hearing about "possibilities of coexistence," and Odeh's insistence risks alienating those Arab-Israelis who desire a more combative leader. Even now, with the Nation-State Law galvanizing Arab society, there is no guarantee that Odeh will be able to hold together the Joint List for elections next year. There is still a lot of "bad blood" between the four parties that form it, she said.

    Odeh is thinking beyond his immediate bloc. He talked about forming a "democratic coalition" for those who want to resist not just Netanyahu's government, but right-wing and antidemocratic governments all over the world, and told me that the most important question in Israel right now is who can exclude who first.

    Will the right wing win over a big-enough majority of Jews to exclude Arab-Israelis, or will Arab-Israelis form a coalition that excludes the right wing? Such a thing has happened before, he reminded me. In the 1990s, Arab-Israeli Knesset members helped Labor leader Yitzak Rabin form the government that negotiated the Oslo Accords, one of the most significant movements in the Israel-Palestine peace process.

    But times are different. In the age of US President Donald Trump, he said, Netanyahu appears reasonable, and that could open the door for moves that could shake the status quo to its foundations.

    Cohen, Odeh's adviser, told me that many Israelis believe the government is laying the groundwork for annexing Area C, which comprises 60% of the West Bank and is where 500,000 Jewish settlers live. As part of the Oslo Accords, the West Bank was divided into three areas. While A and B are managed by the Palestinian Authority, and Area C is under complete Israeli-military control. Estimates for the Palestinian population there range from 150,000 to 300,000, according to The Washington Post.

    Taking Area C, something proposed openly by right-wing education minister Naftali Bennet, would all but end the two-state solution.

    There is ‘no future for the Israeli economy' without Arabs

    ummelfahem 2

    For all the apparent provocations against Arab-Israelis — the Nation-State Law, the demolitions, the tirades of right-wing politicians — there's a growing awareness that they are increasingly integral to Israel's future.

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said in its 2018 report that Israel needs to better integrate its Arab-Israelis or risk economic stagnation and declining living standards for all of Israel.

    While Knesset members may have little interest in helping Arab society, Odeh said, the ministries and the bureaucracy have acknowledged that economic development and equality is "in the interests of everyone."

    As Robert Cherry, a Brooklyn College professor of economics who has written extensively on discrimination and race, wrote last year, there is a wide gap between the inflammatory anti-Arab rhetoric of Netanyahu, Bennett, and others in the ruling coalition and the positive actions they have taken to aid Arab-Israeli society.

    "Netanyahu knows and understands that there is no future for the Israeli economy without the Arabs and [ultra-Orthodox Jews]," Abed Kanaaneh of the left-wing coexistence organization Sikkuy, told The Jerusalem Post in November. "You can say a lot about him, but on economics, he knows what to do."

    As part of Resolution 922, the $4.3 billion five-year plan for the Arab sector passed in 2015, funding was increased for Arab business centers and accelerators and the government plans to invest $25.6 million in small and medium-size Arab businesses.

    The government has also pledged to fund 30 months of salaries for Arab employees if a company hires five or more people from that population. The Innovation Authority, the office charged with developing the science and tech industries, said it was expanding grant and support programs for Arab entrepreneurs. The hope is to increase the percentage of Arabs working in the tech industry. Currently, they make up only 3% of the workforce.

    Israel News AymanOdeh Arab (6 of 29)

    Israel News AymanOdeh Arab (7 of 29)

    "This is what beats the racism: economics," Dror Sadot, Odeh's spokeswoman, said with a laugh as we walked with Odeh through the winding alleyways of Wadi Nisnas, a colorful Arab neighborhood in Haifa.

    Odeh stopped in every shop, every restaurant, and every market stall, and greeted each proprietor the same way he greeted me — with a million-dollar smile, a bear hug, and a pat on the back. Having started his career in the city council, he knows everyone, and everyone knows him.

    People called out to him, "Ayman, Ayman." Haifa is a city, but, as residents told me, it acts like a village. Odeh is the village kid who made it big.

    We stand in front of the vegetable market, and a Jewish professor at the local university put down his bags and said something to Odeh. He then shook his hand vigorously. I asked Sadot what the man had said.

    "You bring pride to Haifa."

    SEE ALSO: I visited the most contested city in the Middle East, where Israelis and Palestinians are separated by a gauntlet of military checkpoints — and the harsh, complicated truth of the conflict was immediately clear

    DON'T MISS: A Supreme Court hearing in Israel that erupted into a brawl showed in a matter of minutes why the Israel-Palestine conflict has been impossible to solve

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    Mark Cuban

    • Mark Cuban has an estimated net worth of $3.9 billion.
    • He's earned his fortune through a lifetime of business deals, including the $5.7 billion sale of Broadcast.com, his ownership of the Dallas Mavericks, and investments made on ABC's "Shark Tank."
    • Cuban has spent millions on private airplanes, a yacht, and a luxurious Dallas home, not to mention $2 million in fines from the NBA.
    • Cuban is in the news this week after an investigation into the Mavericks organization surfaced evidence of a hostile workplace for women. Cuban has pledged to donate $10 million to women's causes and domestic violence awareness.


    Mark Cuban is one of the wealthiest people in America, with an estimated net worth of $3.9 billion according to Forbes.

    The businessman and investor earned his fortune with a series of shrewd business deals starting in the 1990s, most notably the sale of his streaming site Broadcast.com for $5.7 billion in stocks.

    He bought the NBA's Dallas Mavericks in 2000 and helped transform them into a championship team.

    And he's added to his empire with investments like the ones he makes each week on ABC's "Shark Tank," where he's been a regular for eight years.

    Cuban is in the news this week after an investigation into the Mavericks organization surfaced evidence of a hostile workplace for women. Cuban has pledged to donate $10 million to women's causes and domestic violence awareness.

    But $10 million isn't the fortune it sounds like to the billionaire. Over the years, he's spent his money on private planes, a 24,000-square-foot house, a $110,000 bar tab, and millions of dollars of fines from the NBA. 

    Read on to see how Cuban has earned — and spent — his fortune.

    SEE ALSO: A look inside the daily routine of billionaire investor Mark Cuban, who starts working the minute he wakes up and falls asleep to 'Law & Order'

    Mark Cuban is worth an estimated $3.9 billion, according to Forbes. That ranks him among the 250 richest people in America.

    Source: Forbes



    Cuban made his fortune over a lifetime of shrewd business deals. He's the owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks …

    Source: Forbes



    … he's the co-founder of 2929 Entertainment, which owns the production companies behind films like "Akeelah and the Bee" and "Good Night and Good Luck" …

    Source: Biography



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    iPhone X

    Your iPhone's camera just got some exciting new upgrades.

    The latest version of Apple's iPhone and iPad operating system, iOS 12, arrived on Monday, which means devices as old as the iPhone 5S can get a free upgrade. The new OS includes notable additions like a standalone Measure app that's like a virtual tape measure, tools to combat smartphone addiction, grouped notifications, and more.

    But some of the most exciting changes are to the camera and Photos app. Apple made some upgrades designed to not only make using the Photos app easier and more intuitive, but improve your phone's camera.

    Here's a look at all the new photo features in iOS 12:

    SEE ALSO: Here are all the major changes coming to iPhones and iPads with iOS 12

    Let's start with the camera itself. One of the improvements in iOS 12 is portrait lighting, a camera feature for the iPhone 8 Plus and later models.

    Apple debuted portrait lighting last year on the iPhone X and iPhone 8 Plus. The feature allows users to add effects to portrait-mode images that mimic various lighting scenarios inside a portrait studio.

    Critics weren't exactly impressed by portrait lighting, and it's hard to imagine it's a feature used often.

    Still, any update is welcome, and Apple says the camera can now generate a mask when it detects a person in the frame, better separating the person from the rest of the image.



    Apple improved Animoji for iPhone X users and added a few new characters.

    With iOS 12, Animoji can now wink and stick out their tongues.

    Apple also added four new Animoji characters: a ghost, a koala, a tiger, and a T-rex.



    Apple introduced Memoji, customizable avatars that look like you.

    Apple added Memoji, customizable avatars that work similarly to Animoji, in iOS 12. Memoji can work by themselves in iMessage or be used during group FaceTime chats.

    Memoji are available only for the iPhone X and above.



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    Greece Mykonos Santorini Travel Billionaires Islands (18 of 44)

    • The Greek island of Mykonos is known as a party capital and is a vacation hot spot for millionaires and billionaires.
    • Ibiza, Spain, has a reputation as one of the top places to party in the world, with thumping 24-hour clubs, wild pool parties, and gorgeous beaches.
    • I recently visited both and decided to compare my experiences, as many travelers choose between those islands for their vacation.
    • While Mykonos is no doubt stunning, from its beaches to its resorts, I found it to be overpriced and overcrowded when I visited over the summer. Ibiza, on the other hand, felt accessible at different price points and relatively easy to book and enjoy, even in peak season.

    If you are looking for a 24-hour party, Mediterranean beaches, and a place to vacation like the rich and famous, there are probably two destinations that come to mind: Mykonos, Greece and Ibiza, Spain.

    While Ibiza has long been a party capital of the world, thanks to its association with thumping house music and super DJs like David Guetta, Mykonos is the up-and-comer. 

    Over the past several years, the number of international arrivals to Mykonos has nearly doubled, as the cool rich kids and their freshly scrubbed yachts, superyachts, and mega yachts have taken to the Greek isle's inviting waters. Hundreds of thousands of vacationers have followed suit.

    I had own expectations before visiting each island. In both cases, I expected to find a bifurcated paradise divided between the world's wealthy and famous having a private ball and crowds of vacationers, hard-partying dance-music junkies, and cruise-shippers peeking in for a glance.

    While such a dynamic is present on both Ibiza and Mykonos, I found the two islands to be drastically different in temperaments, options, scenery, and vibe. With this in mind, I decided to compare my experiences of visiting Ibiza and Mykonos to see which is the better place to visit for most travelers.

    Here's how they stack up:

    SEE ALSO: I visited Ibiza, the party capital of the world, but the best part of the island is the side no one ever talks about

    DON'T MISS: I visited the glittering Greek island of Mykonos, the summer destination of choice for billionaires — and it's a very different experience if you aren't swimming in money

    Measuring just 33 square miles in size, Mykonos is a sunny and cool Greek island stuffed with hip boutique hotels, thumping beach clubs, haute couture shops, white sandy beaches, whitewashed alleyways, and swanky restaurants.



    Located in the Balearic Islands of Spain and around 220 square miles, Ibiza is known both for its swanky beach hotels and villas frequented by the wealthy and famous and for its thumping nonstop clubbing scene.



    Getting to Mykonos is pretty easy, so long as you are coming from Europe. The airport has direct connections with most major European cities (I flew in from Larnaca, Cyprus). But if you are coming from the US, you will likely have to fly to Athens first and either hop a short flight or ferry from there.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Shake Shack Innovation Kitchen12

    • Shake Shack is opening its Innovation Kitchen on Tuesday, where it will test its new menu items and allow customers to give feedback. 
    • The test kitchen will allow Shake Shack to try more chef-driven items like the Humm Burger created by chef Daniel Humm, the Piggie Shack burger created Daniel Bouloud, an Eel Burger, and others.
    • The Innovation Kitchen is opening in the West Village, and the design was inspired by the neighborhood.

    Shake Shack is opening a new restaurant on Tuesday where it will offer a rotating menu of new items and allow customers to give feedback on their favorite dishes. 

    Currently, Shake Shack has been operating out of a small basement space in Midtown Manhattan, but the new Innovation Kitchen in Manhattan's West Village will allow it to test more chef-driven items on the menu before rolling them out nationwide. 

    Some of the new menu items Shake Shack will be testing will be the Veggie Shack burger, which is already testing regionally, and other new products like chick’n bites, a cold brew matcha latte, and a black sesame shake.

    The restaurant, which opens to the public Tuesday, will feature outdoor café seating and art installations from local artists. 

    Here's what the new test kitchen is like:

    SEE ALSO: These are America's favorite restaurant chains

    Shake Shack's Innovation Kitchen is opening in NYC's West Village.



    Like most of Shake Shack's new restaurants, there are digital ordering kiosks for customers to order at. There will be one cashier alongside the kiosks.



    The restaurant was designed to reflect the neighborhood its in with greenery, outdoor seating, and an art installation by local artist Josh Cochran.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    monaco yacht show

    • Monaco is a magnet for the wealthy and the elite thanks to its glamour and affluence.
    • Every September, Monaco hosts the Monaco Yacht Show, the world's biggest superyacht event.
    • The Monaco Yacht Show welcomes yachts larger than 300 feet — as well as the 1% who come and shop for them.

    Monaco is the world's second-smallest country, but only literally speaking. Once you get inside its .75 square miles, it's larger than life. A magnet for the 1%, the French Riviera city-state has a worldwide reputation for glamour and affluence. 

    In fact, one in every 56 people who live in Monaco has a $30 million net worth, and the price of prime property there sells for $9,000 per square foot, according to Wealth-X's World Ultra Wealth Report. When you couple such wealth with a prime location on the Mediterranean, it's no surprise that Monaco is also an iconic superyacht hub.

    In addition to several events associated with the rich and famous, such as the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters and the Monaco Grand Prix, Monaco is also home to the Monaco Yacht Show — the world's biggest superyacht event. Set to take place from September 26 to September 29, it's right around the corner, with yachts larger than 300 feet lined up waiting for prospective owners to buy.

    From parties to the yachts themselves, here's how the 1% makes the most of the Monaco Yacht Show.

    SEE ALSO: Rich people are descending on Southern France for the Cannes Yachting Festival, where Bugattis are everywhere and the Champagne never stops

    SEE ALSO: I spent 3 years writing about yachts, and owning one takes way more money than you think

    This year, the Monaco Yacht Show takes place from September 26 to September 29 in Monaco. Tickets for a one day pass cost €280 ($328) online or €300 ($352) in person.

    Instagram Embed:
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    Source:Monaco Yacht Show

     



    It's arguably the most prestigious and high-end superyacht show of the year — 40 new superyachts are expected to make their worldwide debut this year.

    Instagram Embed:
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    Width: 540px

     



    Around this time, the 1% descend upon Port Hercules in Monte Carlo in search of the perfect yacht. Here's how they spend their time there.

    Instagram Embed:
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    Width: 540px

     



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    trump china tariffs 2x1

    • China has scrapped upcoming trade talks with the US and will not send vice-premier Liu He to Washington, DC, next week.
    • Earlier this week, China slapped import tariffs on $60 billion of US products in retaliation for US tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods that are set to go into effect on September 24.
    • 85-95% of American exports to China now face tariffs.

    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China has canceled upcoming trade talks with the United States and will not send vice-premier Liu He to Washington next week, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing sources.

    The Wall Street Journal said a mid-level delegation was due to travel to Washington ahead of Liu’s visit, but the trip has now been abandoned.

    Earlier this week, China added $60 billion of U.S. products to its import tariff list as it retaliated against U.S. duties on $200 billion of Chinese goods set to go into effect from September 24.

    "In order to safeguard its legitimate rights and interests and the global free trade order, China will have to retaliate as a response," a statement from the ministry said earlier Tuesday, before the specifics of the retaliation were released.

    The Trump administration initiated the latest round in the US-China trade war overnight. When the new tariffs take effect, over half of all Chinese goods coming into the US will be subject to duties. The US has sought to use tariffs to pressure Beijing to change some of its trade practices.

    "For months, we have urged China to change these unfair practices and give fair and reciprocal treatment to American companies," President Donald Trump said in a statement.

    "We have been very clear about the type of changes that need to be made, and we have given China every opportunity to treat us more fairly. But, so far, China has been unwilling to change its practices."

    The new tariffs from Beijing are in line with what the ministry previously threatened, and they mean 85% to 95% of American exports to China are now facing tariffs.

    Join the conversation about this story »

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    Brett Kavanaugh

    • Christine Blasey Ford has accepted the Senate Judiciary Committee's request to testify against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.
    • Ford alleges that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a high school party in the 1980s. Kavanaugh denies the accusation.
    • In a letter to the committee's counsel, Ford's lawyers wrote that the committee's proposal was "fundamentally inconsistent" with its promise of a fair and impartial investigation.
    • They also said they were "disappointed with the leaks and the bullying that have tainted the process," but that they hope to reach agreement on the details of Ford's testimony.

    Lawyers representing Christine Blasey Ford say she has accepted the Senate Judiciary Committee’s request to testify about her allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, The Washington Post reported.

    In a letter to the committee's counsel, Ford's lawyers wrote, "Although many aspects of the proposal you provided via email ... are fundamentally inconsistent with the Committee's promise of a fair, impartial investigation into her allegations, and we are disappointed with the leaks and the bullying that have tainted the process, we are hopeful that we can reach agreement on details."

    They then asked if they could set up a call with the committee counsel to negotiate over other specifics of Ford's testimony.

    The decision comes after days of back and forth between Ford and Republicans on the committee over the date and terms of her testimony.

    Ford has accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a high school party in the 1980s. Kavanaugh denies it. Ford's attorneys have also asked that the FBI investigate, but President Donald Trump has resisted the request. He said the FBI is not interested in investigating Ford’s allegations, even though the FBI routinely conducts background checks on presidential nominees.

    Committee chairman Chuck Grassley proposed a Wednesday hearing, during which Ford can speak to senators on the committee and Kavanaugh can formally respond. The lawmakers initially floated a Monday hearing, but Ford's attorneys pushed back.

    In a letter to the committee cited by CNN on Friday night, Ford's lawyer, Debra Katz, scolded the committee for taking what she called a "cavalier" attitude toward "a sexual assault survivor who has been doing her best to cooperate with the Committee."

    Grassley granted Ford’s legal team’s request for more time to decide, and then fumed about it in a series of tweets late Friday night. He initially gave Ford's attorneys until Friday at 10 p.m. ET to respond to a request to have Ford testify to lawmakers. Ford's attorney said, "our modest request is that she be given an additional day to make decision."

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    Everlane

    • Millennials are known for shopping around rather than sticking to one brand.
    • Their shopping habits have created an opportunity for emerging brands to enter the market.
    • In a recent survey conducted by Goldman Sachs and Conde Nast, a group of consumers between the ages of 13 and 34 were asked to list the new brands that they are hearing about or shopping at more now versus last year. 

    Millennials may have lots of good qualities, but brand loyalty isn't one of them. 

    This generation is known for their tendency to shop around, and the rise of e-commerce and mobile shopping has given them the necessary tools to do so.

    While this may have created a tougher environment for legacy brands, it has also given more opportunity for newer brands to enter the market. 

    In an annual survey conducted by Goldman Sachs and Conde Nast called the Love List, a group of consumers between the ages of 13 and 34 were asked various questions about their shopping habits and preferred brands. 1,489 US consumers, as well as 1,174 Conde Nast "It Girls" (a group of Conde Nast readers who tend to be more affluent), were surveyed for the report. 

    In one question, shoppers were asked to name the fashion, athletic, or beauty/grooming brands that they have bought from or are hearing about today but weren't focused on last year. The results were then split out by established and emerging brands. 

    Here are the 12 up-and-coming brands highlighted by these consumers:

    SEE ALSO: A preppy apparel startup is defying J. Crew's curse and dominating the millennial market

    GlamGlow

    Skincare brand GlamGlow was originally created for professionals working with celebrities in the entertainment industry. It is now available for purchase online and in stores such as Macy's, Nordstrom, and Sephora. 

    It's best known for its mud masks, which cost between $59 to $79, depending on size. 
     



    Fenty Beauty

    Rihanna's beauty brand, Fenty, which is owned by the world's largest luxury retailer, LVMH, only launched in 2017 but is already making waves in the beauty industry. Its products range from $19 for a lipstick up to $38 for powders. The collection is currently sold online and in Sephora stores in the US.

    According to WWD, in its first month of operation, sales at Fenty were five times higher than Kylie Cosmetics, the $800 million beauty company owned by Kylie Jenner. 



    Glossier

    Operating almost exclusively online, Glossier is leading the way in beauty products. It has attracted more than $86 million in funding since founder Emily Weiss began selling beauty products in 2013. Revenues reportedly tripled from 2016 to 2017.  

    According to Bloomberg, the company sells one of its popular $16 "Boy Brow" eyebrow shapers every minute, accounting for an estimated $8 million in sales per year.



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    paul gosar

    • Arizona Republican Paul Gosar has accused his six siblings of being "disgruntled Hillary supporters" after they released a campaign ad endorsing Gosar's Democratic opponent.
    • In the ad, the siblings criticized their brother's views on issues like health care and immigration, and argued that Paul Gosar doesn't have Arizonans' interests at heart.
    • Paul Gosar tweeted Saturday that he's "Mom's favorite," after The New York Times reported that his mother was "shocked" and "crushed" to learn of the campaign ad.
    • "To the six angry Democrat Gosars — see you at Mom and Dad's house!" Paul Gosar tweeted.


    Rep. Paul Gosar, a Republican congressman from Arizona, has responded to his six siblings who denounced him in a recent campaign ad, calling them "disgruntled Hillary supporters" who "hate President Trump."

    Gosar noted that he had won the approval of his mother, who told The New York Times she was "shocked" and "crushed" to learn that her children had participated in a series of campaign videos attacking their brother.

    "I guess I really am Mom's favorite!" Gosar tweeted Saturday.

    Bernadette Gosar, 85, told The Times that she had been unaware of her children's appearance in the ads until reporters described them to her. She said she supported her son's beliefs.

    "I share the same philosophy and policies that Paul does," she said. "He's done a hell of a job for Arizona, and they love him."

    Paul Gosar's siblings, however, disagreed. In the first ad that surfaced online Friday night, Tim, David, Grace, Joan, Gaston, and Jennifer Gosar each criticized their brother's views on issues like health care and immigration, and endorsed David Brill, their brother's Democratic opponent.

    "He's not listening to you, and he doesn't have your interests at heart," Tim Gosar said.

    Watch the full video below:

    On Saturday, Paul Gosar struck back at his siblings, and said he hoped they "find peace in their hearts and let go all the hate.

    "These disgruntled Hillary supporters are related by blood to me but like leftists everywhere, they put political ideology before family. Stalin would be proud," he tweeted.

    He added: "To the six angry Democrat Gosars — see you at Mom and Dad's house!"

    Bryan Logan contributed reporting.

    SEE ALSO: 6 siblings of an Arizona Republican congressman endorsed his Democratic opponent in a scathing campaign ad

    DON'T MISS: A congressman demanded Capitol Police arrest and deport the 'Dreamers' invited to the State of the Union

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