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The latest news from Life

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    Elizabeth Warren

    • Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Thursday said senior Trump administration officials should consider invoking the 25th Amendment to remove the president from office. 
    • The call comes as the Trump administration is reeling from widespread allegations of mutiny within the White House. 
    • "If senior administration officials think the President of the United States is not able to do his job, then they should invoke the 25th Amendment," Warren told CNN.
    • The 25th Amendment has never been invoked in US history. 

    Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Thursday said Trump administration officials should consider invoking the 25th Amendment to remove the president from office, becoming perhaps the most prominent member of Congress to suggest such a move.

    "If senior administration officials think the President of the United States is not able to do his job, then they should invoke the 25th Amendment," Warren, a rumored potential 2020 presidential candidate, told CNN.

    The Massachusetts senator cited allegations in Bob Woodward's forthcoming book, "Fear," which portrays the Trump administration as a chaotic, disunited entity. She also referenced a bombshell New York Times op-ed from an unidentified senior Trump administration official who claimed there's a "quiet resistance" to the president in the White House

    "The Constitution provides for a procedure whenever the vice president and senior officials think the President can't do his job," Warren said. "It does not provide that senior officials go around the president – take documents off his desk, write anonymous op-eds. ... Every one of these officials have sworn to uphold the Constitution of the United States. It's time for them to do their job."

    Warren suggested the country is in "crisis" when senior officials don't believe the president can do his job and "refuse to follow the rules that have been laid down in the Constitution."

    "They can't have it both ways," Warren said. "Either they think that the President is not capable of doing his job in which case they follow the rules in the Constitution, or they feel that the President is capable of doing his job, in which case they follow what the President tells them to do."

    Under Section 4 of the 25th Amendment to the US Constitution, if the vice president and a majority of sitting Cabinet members conclude the president is not able to "discharge the powers and duties of his office," then the vice president becomes acting president.

    The would have to write a letter to the president pro tempore of the Senate (currently Sen. Orrin Hatch) and the speaker of the House of Representatives (currently Rep. Paul Ryan) and inform them they do not believe the president is able to continue fulfilling his duties. 

    Two-thirds of both chambers of Congress would then have 21 days to vote on whether keep the vice president in charge — otherwise power would automatically transfer back to the president. 

    The 25th Amendment has never been invoked in US history.

    SEE ALSO: Trump's Cabinet reportedly whispered about invoking the 25th Amendment, which lets 14 people remove a sitting president from office

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: Meet the woman behind Trump's $20 million merch empire


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    kavanaugh frown

    • Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Thursday was slammed by reproductive-rights groups after he referred to some forms of birth control as "abortion-inducing drugs" during his confirmation hearing for the Supreme Court. 
    • Kavanaugh's remarks were characterized as "anti-woman, anti-science propaganda."
    • Kavanaugh's comments on Thursday have bolstered concerns from critics regarding his stance on Roe v. Wade.

    Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Thursday was slammed by reproductive-rights groups after he seemingly referred to some forms of birth control as "abortion-inducing drugs" during his confirmation hearing for the Supreme Court. 

    During the hearing, Republican Sen. Ted Cruz questioned Kavanaugh about his role in the 2015 Priests for Life v. HHS case. At the time, Kavanaugh wrote a dissent in which he defended the anti-abortion Catholic group, which didn't want to provide insurance coverage to employees for contraceptives. 

    When asked about this on Thursday, Kavanaugh said, "Filling out the form would make them complicit in the provision of the abortion-inducing drugs that they were, as a religious matter, objected to."

    Groups that champion reproductive rights, like NARAL Pro-Choice America, the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, and the Center for Reproductive Rights, rebuked Kavanaugh for using the term, "abortion-inducing drugs."

    'Anti-woman, anti-science propaganda'

    "Kavanaugh just referred to birth control as 'abortion-inducing drugs,' which is not only an anti-science lie, it's an anti-choice extremist phrase that shows that our right to access both abortion and contraception would be in SERIOUS danger if he is confirmed," NARAL tweeted

    Dawn Laguens, executive vice president at the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, told HuffPost that Kavanaugh's remarks were "anti-woman, anti-science propaganda."

    "Let me break it down for you, Brett," Laguens added. "Birth control is basic health care. Birth control allows women to plan their futures, participate in the economy, and ― for some women with health issues like endometriosis ― allows them to get through the day."

    The Center for Reproductive Rights in a tweet said Kavanaugh's remarks were "straight out of the anti-choice, anti-science phrase book used to restrict women's access to essential health care."

    Kavanaugh was also criticized by Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who sits on the Senate Judiciary Committee. Feinstein on Thursday tweeted his comments were "further proof" of his "hostility toward women's reproductive freedom."

    But it's also unclear if Kavanaugh was referencing all birth control in his statement on Thursday or was just pointing to the specific views of the Catholic organization.

    With that said, Priests for Life is opposed to all forms of contraception and has been accused of falsely conflating birth control with abortion with such terminology. 

    'Facts are very important'

    Priests for Life was opposed to covering "abortion-inducing products, contraceptives, and sterilization," according to court documents. 

    Anti-abortion groups like Priests for Life have controversially referred to intrauterine devices (IUDs) and emergency contraceptives as "abortion-inducing." 

    These are dubious characterizations, given doctors do not consider IUDs or emergency contraceptives to be abortifacients, defined by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists (ACOG) as "an agent that disturbs an embryo already implanted in the uterine lining, after a pregnancy has been established."

    "Facts are very important, especially when discussing the health of the American public. Contrary to assertions made by some, emergency contraception and IUDs do not cause abortions, and therefore are not abortifacients. Here are the scientific facts," ACOG said in a June 2014 statement

    The statement went on to say that emergency contraception (EC) doesn't cause medical abortions.

    "A woman can take mifepristone to cause a medical abortion, terminating an early existing pregnancy. EC however only works before a pregnancy is established," ACOG said. "Review of the scientific evidence suggests that EC cannot prevent implantation of a fertilized egg. EC is not effective after implantation; it cannot end a pregnancy and is not an abortifacient."

    Hence, even in the context of discussing the Priests for Life case, Kavanaugh's dubious reiteration of the phrase "abortion-inducing drugs" has been seized upon as a telling moment in terms of his views on reproductive rights. 

    In short, Kavanaugh's comments on Thursday have greatly bolstered concerns he'll seek to undermine Roe v. Wade if he's ultimately confirmed. 

    SEE ALSO: What it looks like inside Brett Kavanaugh's raucous confirmation hearing, filled with loud protesters and testy senators

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: A North Korean defector's harrowing story of escape


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    Donald Trump Rudy Giuliani

    • President Donald Trump will not answer federal investigators' questions, in writing or in person, about whether he tried to block the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election.
    • Trump's attorney, Rudy Giuliani made that assertion in an interview with the AP on Thursday, saying questions about obstruction of justice were a "no-go."
    • It signals the Trump's lawyers are committed to protecting the president from answering questions about actions the president took in office.
    • Giuliani softened his position in an interview with The Wall Street Journal published late Thursday, saying Trump won't address Mueller's obstruction of justice questions "until after the Russian collusion aspect of the probe is finished."

    President Donald Trump will not answer federal investigators' questions, in writing or in person, about whether he tried to block the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election, one of the president's attorneys told The Associated Press on Thursday.

    Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani said questions about obstruction of justice were a "no-go."

    Giuliani's statement was the most definitive rejection yet of special counsel Robert Mueller's efforts to interview the president about any efforts to obstruct the investigation into possible coordination between his campaign and Russians. It signals the Trump's lawyers are committed to protecting the president from answering questions about actions the president took in office.

    It's unclear if Giuliani's public position has been endorsed by Trump, who has said he wants to answer questions under oath. Negotiations about the scope and format of an interview are still ongoing. If the legal team holds its stance, it could force Mueller to try to subpoena the president, likely triggering a standoff that would lead to the Supreme Court.

    Mueller's office has previously sought to interview the president about the obstruction issue, including his firing last year of former FBI Director James Comey and his public attacks on Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Trump's legal team has argued that the president has the power to hire and fire appointees and the special counsel does not have the authority to ask him to explain those decisions. Giuliani said Thursday the team was steadfast in that position.

    "That's a no-go. That is not going happen," Giuliani said. "There will be no questions at all on obstruction."

    In a letter last week, Mueller's team said it would accept written responses from Trump on questions related to Russian election interference. Giuliani suggested Thursday that Trump's lawyers had agreed to those terms but wanted to prohibit investigators from asking follow-up questions.

    "It would be in written form and if you want to follow up on our answers, justify it. Show us why you didn't get there the first time," Giuliani said. He said he was not categorically ruling out answering a second round of questions but the entire matter of whether there would be follow-up inquiries should be settled before the president answers anything at all.

    "We aren't going to let them spring it on us," said Giuliani, who has served as lawyer-spokesman for the president's personal legal team, using television interviews and public comments as a tactic in the negotiations.

    In the latest letter to the legal team, Mueller's office didn't address obstruction questions, indicating investigators would later assess what additional information it needs from the president after receiving a response about the written submissions, according to a person familiar with the document.

    The person familiar with the letter spoke on condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to publicly discuss the negotiations.

    Though the president has publicly said he was eager to face questions from Mueller, his lawyers have been far more reluctant to make him available for an interview and have questioned whether Mueller has the right to ask him about actions that he is authorized, under the Constitution, to take as president.

    Giuliani softened his position in an interview with The Wall Street Journal late Thursday, saying Trump won't address Mueller's obstruction of justice questions "until after the Russian collusion aspect of the probe is finished."

    Mueller's team raised the prospect in March that it could subpoena the president, though this would unquestionably prompt a court fight.

    The Supreme Court has never definitively ruled on the question of whether a president can be forced to testify, though the justices did rule in 1974 that Richard Nixon had to produce recordings and documents that had been subpoenaed.

    In addition to questions about Comey and Sessions, Mueller has expressed interest in Trump's role in drafting a statement to The New York Times about a June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower attended by his son, Donald Trump Jr., and a Russian lawyer.

    Trump Jr. took the meeting, emails show, after it was described as part of a Russian government effort to help his father's campaign by providing derogatory information about Democrat Hillary Clinton.

    Trump has said he knew nothing about the meeting before it happened.

    Trump and Giuliani have led an onslaught of attacks on Mueller's credibility, claiming that the special counsel was biased and that the entire probe was a "witch hunt." Giuliani has also demanded that the probe suspend its activities with the midterm elections approaching, but the former mayor said Thursday he was not certain of Mueller's intentions.

    ___

    Associated Press writers Eric Tucker and Chad Day contributed reporting from Washington.

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    NOW WATCH: Meet the woman behind Trump's $20 million merch empire


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    Hong Konhong kong celebration fireworks

    • Hong Kong has officially surpassed New York City as the place with the highest concentration of super-wealthy people. 
    • Hong Kong has seen a 31% increase in the number of ultra-rich residents worth at least $30 million, according to a new report from the data firm, Wealth-X.
    • Tokyo, Los Angeles, and Paris were among the top-ranked cities, but major US cities largely dominated the list. 
    • Property prices in Hong Kong have increased to reflect the growing wealth of its residents, though the country is in the midst of a housing crisis with limited zoning allocated for residential development.  

    Hong Kong has officially surpassed New York City as the place with the highest concentration of super wealthy people. 

    Hong Kong has seen a 31% increase in the number of ultra-rich residents worth at least $30 million, according to a report released Thursday from the data firm, Wealth-X. The region had just over 10,000 residents who fall into the  "ultra-high net-worth" category, compared to roughly 9,000 ultra-high net-worth people in New York City.

    Tokyo, Los Angeles, London, and Paris were also among the top 10 cities on the list.

    Globally, the number of ultra-wealthy people rose by 13% in 2017, totaling over 250,000. According to the data, that cohort has a combined net worth of $31.5 trillion.

    A majority of the super-rich made between $30-$100 million, while more than 2,700 people — or roughly one percent — made $1 billion or more last year. Women accounted for nearly 14% of ultra-high net-worth individuals, a record high for the group.

    Asia saw the fastest growth of mega-millionaires, driven mainly by Hong Kong and mainland China. According to 2017 estimates, one in seven people in Hong Kong is a millionaire

    And property prices in the country have increased to reflect the growing wealth of its inhabitants. 

    Hong Kong has broken several property records over the last year. It was there in November 2017 that the most expensive apartments in Asia sold for a combined $149 million.

    And in June, a single parking space in Hong Kong that was originally purchased for $430,000 resold for nearly double the price.

    Hong Kong is currently suffering from a housing crisis, where a fraction of its land area is zoned for residential property development.

    SEE ALSO: A Hong Kong couple bought a single parking space for $433,000 and flipped it for $760,000 in just 9 months

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    NOW WATCH: What people are missing when it comes to trade, stocks, and the market's favorite recession signal, according to a JPMorgan chief strategist


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    manipultive

    Manipulative people can be found in every walk of life. You might meet them at work where they take credit for your achievements, or in social situations where they are controlling, demanding, and even abusive.

    Knowing the right words to deal with these people can give you the strength to stand up to them or walk away. In the cases of romantic relationships, manipulation is probably a sign of an abusive relationship, so the best thing to do is to run fast and far away.

    Once equipped with the terms, it can be easier to see manipulative people for who they really are, and you can gain the strength to walk away.

    Here are 9 phrases you should know if you think someone is manipulating you, and what they mean.

    SEE ALSO: All the sacrifices you'll have to make for a relationship with a narcissist to work

    1. Monitoring

    In the first stages of a romantic relationship, it's normal to feel butterflies, and want to know what your new partner is doing all the time. However, if the person you're starting to be intimate with is manipulative then their affection and attention could be love bombing.

    Lisa Aronson Fontes is a psychology researcher at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and author of "Invisible Chains: Overcoming Coercive Control in Your Intimate Relationship." She told Business Insider that if your boyfriend or girlfriend wants to be in constant contact with you, it could be a warning sign. In fact, constant texts and phone calls can be a form of stalking.

    Not replying to the barrage of messages may end with you being on the receiving end of your partner's wrath, which is a huge red flag. You deserve your space, and anyone worth your time will know and respect this.



    2. Object constancy

    Everybody falls out sometimes, especially in romantic relationships. However, the level to which manipulative people like narcissists get angry with their significant others is beyond what is acceptable.

    Those with personality disorders like narcissism lack something called "object constancy," which is the ability to keep your positive feelings about someone whilst also being angry, annoyed, or disappointed in them.

    When they hurl insults and scream at their partner, narcissists don't feel any of the affectionate feelings they once had. That's why they can seem like a completely different person in these moments, like Jekyll and Hyde. Their reaction is so powerful it can make the victim feel as though they must be in the wrong, which means they start altering their behaviour to make their controlling partner happy.



    3. Moth to a flame

    Contrary to popular belief, manipulative people often seek out those who are strong and confident to prey on, because it makes them feel superior. Targeting vulnerable people doesn't make them feel powerful, so they will often go after you because they see the positives in you — like a moth to a flame.

    If someone is manipulating you at work, it's probably because they see your skills and they want to look like they're even more skilled than you. In a relationship, they want other people to know that someone as great as you has chosen to be with them. It's only behind the scenes that they start to bring you down, because that way they can start to break your confidence. Lower self-esteem makes it more likely you'll stick with a controlling partner, because you may feel like it's what you deserve. 



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    jared kushner stuck outside door

    • Jared Kushner got stuck behind a locked door for 1 minute and 47 seconds on Thursday night.
    • He was trying to get into the US Trade Representative building in Washington, D.C.
    • Katie Simpson, a reporter for Canada's CBC, posted a video of it on Twitter.
    • In the video, Kushner can be seen trying to call someone and dodging journalists' questions, while an aide looks on.
    • The White House senior advisor was there for NAFTA negotiations, Simpson said.

    Jared Kushner got stuck outside a locked door while trying to enter a NAFTA trade meeting in Washington, D.C.

    The White House senior adviser, who is also President Donald Trump's son-in-law, was left waiting outside an entrance to the US Trade Representative building for 1 minute and 47 seconds on Thursday evening.

    The office was the site of meetings about the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) renegotiations, according to Katie Simpson, a reporter for Canada's CBC network who posted the video.

    It shows Kushner awkwardly looking at the journalists gathered outside and appearing to call someone on his phone, while an aide looks out toward the street.

    Meanwhile, the journalists can be heard asking Kushner about the progress of NAFTA negotiations with Canada.

    He also gets asked for his reaction to an explosive New York Times op-ed published by an unnamed senior official in the Trump administration that said they were "part of the resistance" against the president. Kushner and the aide ignored all the questions.

    NAFTA's fate hangs in the balance after the Trump administration notified Congress last month of its plans to enter a bilateral trade deal with Mexico without Canada. The US said Canada could join later "if it is willing."

    SEE ALSO: Trump is driving a wedge between 2 key US allies

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: A North Korean defector's harrowing story of escape


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    Serena Williams, US Open tutu

    • Serena Williams has shared an adorable photograph of her daughter on Instagram.
    • Williams, renowned for her fashion choices, has been wearing tutus during the ongoing US Open tournament in New York City.
    • It appears she dresses her daughter in similar costumes.
    • Cute!

    Serena Williams has shared a photograph on Instagram that shows one clear thing — being a fashion icon may well run in the family.

    This is because Williams posted a photo of her daughter Alexis Olympia Ohanian Jr. wearing an outfit similar to the tutus she has been rocking the the US Open.

    Williams is a 23-time Grand Slam champion in tennis and arguably the greatest women's player of all time, but is also famed for her fashion choices.

    Earlier in the year Williams attracted headlines for wearing a "Black Panther"-style catsuit that she said made her feel like a "warrior princess" from Wakanda, the fictional nation from the smash hit Marvel Comics film.

    The outfit has remained newsworthy as it was recently banned from future French Open events, with French Tennis Federation President Bernard Giudicelli implying that her outfit did not show respect for the game or the competition.

    Regardless, that has not stopped her competing in tutus (see above) while at the US Open, an ongoing tournament that Williams can win should she defeat Naomi Osaka in the final at the Arthur Ashe Stadium on Saturday.

    Williams is not the only one wearing the costume — as she dressed her daughter in one too.

    See the photo Williams shared below:

    “Did Momma win?”

    A post shared by Serena Williams (@serenawilliams) on Sep 6, 2018 at 6:44pm PDT on

    Williams even captioned the photo, "Did momma win?"

    Williams, already dubbed "the greatest Momma of all time" by her husband Alexis Ohanian, will be able to answer that captioned question for good this weekend — as she is just one win away from an extraordinary seventh US Open title.

    SEE ALSO: Nike just dropped a moving ad showing a 9-year-old Serena Williams being encouraged on the court by her father — and he told her to play 'like you're at the US Open'

    DON'T MISS: Serena Williams' Reddit-cofounder husband put all others to shame by installing 4 giant billboards in California saying she's the 'greatest momma of all time'

    UP NEXT: Fans criticized Alexis Ohanian and Serena Williams for not celebrating their daughter's first birthday — and Ohanian had the perfect response

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    NOW WATCH: What it takes to be a World Cup soccer player


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    trump rally montana point

    • President Donald Trump jokingly said in a speech that if he were to be impeached, it would be because his supporters "didn't go out to vote."
    • "It's so ridiculous," Trump said as the audience laughed. "But we'll worry about that if it ever happens. But if it does happen, it's your fault."
    • Democratic lawmakers have largely avoided publicly talking about impeachment, a topic expected to energize Republican voters.
    • READ MORE: A guy standing behind Trump stole the show for several minutes before he was moved off camera

    President Donald Trump jokingly said in a speech Thursday that if he were ever to be impeached, it would be because his supporters "didn't go out to vote."

    Trump began his Thursday-night campaign rally in Billings, Montana, by embellishing some of his economic achievements.

    "You look at the numbers at every category, it's great," Trump said. "We're doing a great job."

    But at one point Trump took a turn, warning that if Democrats regained control in Congress and moved on impeachment proceedings, the blame would rest with his supporters.

    "But we'll worry about that if it ever happens," Trump said. "But if it does happen, it's your fault, because you didn't go out to vote."

    "You didn't go out to vote — that's the only way it could happen."

    As many Republicans, including Trump on Thursday, have used the threat of Trump's impeachment to energize GOP voters into turning out in the November midterms, Democrats have largely avoided the topic. Instead, many have advocated only that the special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation continue unimpeded.

    "If and when the information emerges about that, we'll see," House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said in August when asked about the possibility of impeaching Trump.

    "It's not a priority on the agenda going forward unless something else comes forward," she said.

    Democratic candidates are favored to retake the House but are facing a steeper challenge in the Senate.

    SEE ALSO: White House aides are reportedly scrambling to unmask 'gutless' senior official who wrote the blistering NYT op-ed

    Join the conversation about this story »

    NOW WATCH: A North Korean defector's harrowing story of escape


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    fahrenheit119_TIFF

    • Michael Moore's "Fahrenheit 11/9" had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on Thursday night.
    • The movie is not just about President Donald Trump.
    • From the bad drinking water in Flint, Michigan, to the Parkland, Florida school shooting survivors, the movie covers a lot.


    Though Michael Moore has been pushing his new documentary, “Fahrenheit 11/9,” as a takedown of President Trump, in actuality the movie is a takedown of the entire political system.

    The movie (opening in theaters September 21), is a powerful gut punch that covers many things — Trump, the person behind the awful drinking water in Moore’s beloved Flint, Michigan, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton — really no one is safe from Moore in this movie, and there’s a reason for that: the Oscar-winning director thinks things are pretty messed up.

    For people who are familiar with Moore’s work, that may not come as a shock. From “Roger and Me,” to “Bowling for Columbine,” to “Fahrenheit 9/11,” he’s made a career of showing how many in America are treated unfairly while politicians double-talk and do little (if anything) about it. But with “Fahrenheit 11/9,” it feels a little different.

    Moore has always had a talent for throwing a comedic undertone into what he’s covering, and though there is definitely some of that in this movie, there’s also a lot of emotion. Whether it’s frustration or rage, it’s hard to nail down, but Moore definitely is less playful in this one.

    The movie’s first dark turn is after a look back on election night and Trump’s improbable win. Moore then delves into Trump’s infatuation with his daughter Ivanka and through photographs and soundbites shows the often-uncomfortable ways Trump talks about or touches her. Then there’s Moore’s comparisons of Trump to the rise in power of Adolph Hitler. Moore starts things off by showing footage of Hitler giving a speech with Trump's words coming out when Hitler opens his mouth.

    But Trump is hardly the only person Moore targets in the movie. Moore finds a way to highlight some of the men who were taken down by the #MeToo movement, like Matt Lauer, Charlie Rose, Bill O’Reilly, and Roger Miles. He calls out Obama for coming to Flint while president and doing nothing about the water crisis, even sipping a glass of water handed to him (though to this day the water in Flint is undrinkable). And Moore criticizes Hillary Clinton for not doing enough to win the presidency, like not visiting states that historically would go to a Democrat.

    Fahrenheit 119 Dog Eat Dog

    That’s not to say “Fahrenheit 11/9” is all doom and gloom. Moore does a great job of showing how the establishment has failed in the era of Trump, but also highlights those who have come out of nowhere to gain important places in the political world.

    He shows Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s upset win of the Democratic primary in New York’s 14th congressional district, and features Rashida Tlaib, who won the Democratic nomination for the house of representatives from Michigan’s 13th congressional district and, running unopposed, is expected to become the first Muslim woman in Congress. These people wanted fundamental change, and Moore believes they will radically change the “compromise” mentality that he believes the party currently has.

    And then there are the survivors of the Parkland, Florida school shooting. It’s the second time Moore has put the spotlight on school shooting survivors, the first being those from the Columbine, Colorado shooting in “Bowling for Columbine.” But this time it’s more uplifting as Moore films them as they plan the March for Our Lives event, which galvanized the nation earlier this year. And we see just the kind of influence they have, as following a tweet by Republican Leslie Gibson calling Parkland survivor Emma González a “skinhead lesbian,” fellow survivor David Hogg sent out a tweet encouraging anyone to run against the then-unopposed Gibson for the Maine State House. Quickly a Democrat entered the race and Gibson withdrew. The news of his withdrawal is captured in the film as Moore is with the kids, who then high-five each other and Moore.

    But the part of the movie that will stay with you most isn’t Trump but the water problem in Flint, Michigan. Moore explains how the water source for the predominantly African-American city went from the clean Lake Huron to the dirty Flint River. The switch in 2014 has led to people suffering from high levels of lead in their systems resulting in sickness, hair loss, and death. Moore puts the blame on Michigan governor Rick Snyder, a politician with a business background (like Trump). At one point in the movie, in classic Moore style, the director goes to Snyder's office planning to make a citizen's arrest of the governor. When he’s not allowed to meet with Snyder, and is told the Flint water is now cleaner than bottled water, Moore offers the person a glass of water from Flint. The person refuses to drink it.

    Compared to Moore's earlier work, “Fahrenheit 11/9” isn’t as sharp and is overwhelming at times with the amount of topics it touches on. However, that doesn’t mean Moore has lost any zip on his fastball, as every topic is explored passionately.

     

    SEE ALSO: Burt Reynolds was such a screen icon that even the list of roles he turned down is legendary, from James Bond to Han Solo

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    bolsonaro brazil stab

    • Brazilian far-right congressman Jair Bolsonaro was stabbed in the abdomen during a campaign event Thursday. 
    • Bolsonaro is stable but will remain hospitalized for at least a week after a two-hour operation was performed to stop serious internal bleeding.
    • In the hours following the attack in Juiz de Fora, Bolsonaro supporters predicted it would carry him to the presidency.
    • It is unknown when he can get out again on the campaign trail and if his injuries will impede his ability to campaign.

    The stabbing of a leading Brazilian presidential candidate has the potential to reshape the election contest after dramatically exposing the deep polarization in Latin America's largest nation.

    Far-right congressman Jair Bolsonaro, a former army captain who has promised to crack down on crime, has long argued that Brazil is in chaos and needs a strong hand to be steadied.

    After a knife-wielding man stabbed the candidate in the abdomen during a campaign event Thursday, Brazilians surged on to social media to argue over whether the attack supports Bolsonaro's assertions that the country is off the rails or whether his heated rhetoric contributed to inciting the attack.

    Dr. Luiz Henrique Borsato, who performed emergency surgery on the candidate, said Bolsonaro's recovery so far was "satisfactory."

    He said the candidate would remain hospitalized for at least a week after a two-hour operation to stop serious internal bleeding.

    suspect brazil stabbing

    A suspect was arrested seconds after the stabbing

    In numerous videos posted on social media of the moment of the attack, Bolsonaro could be seen on the shoulders of a supporter, looking out at the crowd and giving a thumbs up with his left hand.

    He is seen flinching and then goes out of view. Other videos show supporters carrying him to a car and hitting a man who was apparently the attacker.

    Bolsonaro's son confirmed the attack on Twitter, saying the wounds were more serious than expected.

    He said the stab wounds reached part of Bolsonaro’s liver, lung and intestines and that he arrived at the hospital "almost dead." 

    Bolsonaro underwent surgery and was later confirmed to be in stable condition. 

    Following the stabbing, a suspect, identified by authorities as 40-year-old Adelio Bispo de Oliveira, was arrested within seconds.

    Police did not give a motive, but one official said the man appeared to be mentally unstable.

    "Our agents there said the attacker said he was 'on a mission from God,'" Luis Boudens, president of the National Federation of Federal Police, told The Associated Press. "Their impression is that they were not dealing with a mentally stable person."

    Analysists say the stabbing could reshape the election

    After more than four years of revelations of widespread corruption within Brazil's political class, anger is running high in the country, and analysts initially predicted this would be a change election. But no true outsider has emerged.

    Instead, Bolsonaro, despite being a congressman since 1991, has harnessed much of the anger and presented himself as a maverick who will clean up a corrupt system.

    He also promises to confront a surge in crime, in part by giving police a freer hand to shoot and kill while on duty.

    The public's anger is partially responsible for making this year's campaign the most unpredictable in years for Brazil, and the attack could lead to another seismic shift.

    The man leading polls, former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, has been barred from running by electoral authorities because he was convicted of corruption and is in jail.

    That puts Bolsonaro in the lead position, though it is unclear how the attack might affect the campaign for the October 7 presidential ballot.

    In the hours following the attack in Juiz de Fora, about 125 miles (200 kilometers) north of Rio de Janeiro, Bolsonaro supporters predicted it would carry him to the presidency.

    "They made Bolsonaro a martyr," said Jonatan Valente, a student who joined a small vigil for Bolsonaro in Sao Paulo. "I think the left shot itself in the foot because with this attack they will end up electing Bolsonaro."

    But it is unknown when he can get out again on the campaign trail and if his injuries will impede his ability to campaign.

    Brazil is divided politically

    There were signs of the deep divide in Brazil at the vigil, when Bolsonaro's supporters briefly exchanged insults with some detractors who showed up.

    Bolsonaro has faced backlash for his statements in the past over his nationalistic policies and controversial views against homosexuality, refugees and minorities.

    Meanwhile, on Twitter many decried the stabbing and asked for prayers for Bolsonaro, but others suggested the candidate might have brought the attack upon himself or even staged it.

    This is not the first time in recent months that violence has touched politicians. In March, while da Silva was on a campaign tour in southern Brazil before his imprisonment, gunshots hit buses in his caravan. No one was hurt.

    Also that month, Marielle Franco, a black councilwoman in Rio de Janeiro, was shot to death in March along with her driver after attending an event.

    While Bolsonaro has a strong following, he is a deeply divisive figure. He has been fined, and even faced charges, for derogatory statements toward women, blacks and gays.

    He speaks nostalgically about the country's 1964-1985 military dictatorship and has promised to fill his government with current and former military leaders. His vice presidential running mate is a retired general.

    "It's likely that Bolsonaro will use the attack to argue his opponents are desperate, that they had no other way to stop him," said Mauricio Santoro, a political science professor at Rio de Janeiro's state university.

    ___

    Associated Press journalists Peter Prengaman and Marcelo Silva de Sousa in Rio de Janeiro and Victor Caivano in Sao Paulo contributed to this report.

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    Sierra Burgess

    • "Sierra Burgess Is a Loser" is the latest Netflix original teen rom-com and dropped Friday.
    • It stars Shannon Purser, a.k.a. Barb from "Stranger Things."
    • It's a charming little movie that focuses more on the female friendship than the romance, which is what makes it special. 

     

    On Friday, "Sierra Burgess Is a Loser," yet another teen rom-com, became available on Netflix. And it stars Noah Centineo, the same male love interest as the streamer's last rom-com hit, "To All the Boys I've Loved Before."

    "Sierra Burgess Is a Loser" is a sweet little movie that stands out among Netflix's others for its bold decision to put its female characters first. It's a movie about female friendship with a romance on the side. 

    The premise is not unusual, but the way it approaches it is. And it starts with the main character. Sierra Burgess, a teenage girl who is insecure about her talent and body, is played by Shannon Purser (a.k.a. Barb from "Stranger Things") who Hollywood has conditioned people into thinking doesn't belong in a leading role. Her nemesis, Veronica (Kristine Froseth), is a tiny, popular cheerleader. 

    At the beginning of the movie, Veronica, who bullies Sierra, gives Jamey (a gorgeous guy on the football team) Sierra's number, pretending it's her own. So Sierra pretends to be Veronica on the phone with Jamey. They hit it off. So Sierra doesn't get caught, she makes a deal with Veronica: If she doesn't say anything, she'll help her study. 

    You probably think you know what goes on from there. And you know some of it. Jamey finds out, and there is a happy ending.

    But what happens in between makes it a better movie. Sierra's body is never used as a joke, as it might in other comedies starring a woman of her size. And Jamey, a sensitive football player, is not the focus of the story. He's what brings Sierra and Veronica together. As Sierra sees what Veronica deals with at home, and Veronica sees how Sierra struggles with constant jabs simply because of her body, they become friends. I'm not condoning catfishing, because what they do to Jamey is wrong, but doing so helps Sierra and Veronica become aware of the insecurities that turned them against each other.  

    "Sierra Burgess Is a Loser" is its own deep movie with a new tone and purpose, but it's still reminiscent of John Hughes movies, especially "Sixteen Candles." So it makes sense that Alan Ruck — Cameron from "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" — plays Sierra's dad. Ruck will probably join the dads from "Eighth Grade" and "To All the Boys I've Loved Before" in the little group of 2018 movie dads the internet is obsessed with right now. 

    The movie also very realistically depicts something that will always relate to most people, no matter how technology changes: a long phone call with someone you like but are still getting to know. Purser and Centineo play off each other perfectly in these drawn out and intentionally awkward scenes, even though they're not in the same room.

    Confronting insecurities and becoming friends with your bully is quite dark. But RJ Cyler, who plays Sierra's best friend, Dan, carries the comedy while letting Purser carry the movie. 

    "Sierra Burgess Is a Loser" is heavy on the darker themes, but its stars, especially Purser, give it lot of heart that will make you want to rewatch it instantly. 

    SEE ALSO: 7 great movies you can watch on Netflix this weekend

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    Yoga Pritikin Longevity Center + Spa

    CEOs and other high-level executives are going on "executive getaways" to de-stress. These programs, ranging from a luxury ranch resort in Colorado to an all-inclusive spa in Miami, can cost up to $25,000 — and in some cases, the company will pay for it.

    "These senior leaders are looked at as assets, so you want to make sure that asset is healthy," Dr. Richard Carmona, a former U.S. surgeon general who is now the chief of health innovation at Canyon Ranch, which offers an executive health program, told CNN Money.

    Executives can enjoy spa facilities, take fitness classes, get tested for their risk of heart disease and cancer, receive personal nutritional and exercise consultations, and in some cases, go to a "boot camp" designed to make them better leaders.

    These programs range in cost from $3,900 to $25,000.

    Canyon Ranch, which Forbes called "one of the world's most esteemed wellness resorts," offers a four-day Executive Health Program that includes "extensive diagnostic evaluation, risk-factor analysis, and preventive strategies," according to its official website.

    Canyon Ranch stress test executive getaway

    The cost of the executive program, available at its locations in Tucson, Arizona, and Lenox, Massachusetts, starts at $5,615, according to the website. That's in addition to the cost of staying at the resort, which is about $1,000 per night for one person and includes meals, access to all facilities, and a $160 daily credit to be used for spa services, from massages to facials to "sole rejuvenation" for the feet.

    According to CNN Money, some CEOs may have such yearly getaways included in their contract.

    Other programs promise to make executives better leaders through physical adventure and 'extreme' experiences.

    With a company called Be Legendary, leaders can take part in a getaway called Shakubuku, described as a "multi-day transformational journey."

    Participants can choose where they want to go (from Denver, Las Vegas, Anchorage, or Sacramento) — but the specific experiences are kept a secret.

    Anchorage, Alaska

    James Carter, founder and CEO of Be Legendary, told Business Insider that in the past, the company has taken executives off-roading, having them drive an SUV down a steep, rocky hill — sometimes blindfolded so they must rely on directions from their passengers — but "only as a piece of the adventure."

    "We 'book-end' the main experience, like off-roading, with other amazing experiences — basically getting to 100% fear and swinging to 100% hope/elation," Carter said.

    These adventure retreats, which Carter characterized as learning and growth opportunities rather than "adrenaline experiences," cost between $7,500 and $25,000 per person. The program in Anchorage, Alaska, which will take place in August 2019, is ranked the most physically demanding and costs $22,500.

    Many CEOs are in a near-constant state of high stress — and it hurts their health.

    In general, CEOs are stressed out, exhausted and overworked.

    "The major emotions a CEO has are frustration, disappointment, irritation and overwhelm," Steve Tappin, who teamed up with a neuroscientist to run physiological and neurological tests on CEOs for his 2010 book, "The Secrets of CEOs," told CNN in a 2010 story. "There should be a health warning. If you have those emotions for 80% of the day, they lead to stress and cortisol in the body, which leads to accelerated ageing, heart attacks and cancer."

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who is often seen sleeping under desks or tables at work, recently admitted that he was so exhausted from this past year at Tesla that he sometimes uses the sleep aid Ambien.

    SEE ALSO: It can be hard for a new boss to earn respect — but experts say there are psychological tricks to speed things up

    DON'T MISS: 15 successful CEOs share the one business book they think everyone should read

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    BengalCove 5

    • In August, Portugal was recognized as the hottest travel destination of 2018, due in no small part to the country's spectacular beaches, which many say are the most beautiful in the world.
    • I recently took a six-day road trip to find the best beaches Portugal had to offer, taking the advice of local Portuguese that I met on my trip.
    • The best beaches were far from the touristy hot spots in the Algarve region and were more wild, beautiful, and remote than I could have imagined.

    Planning a trip to Portugal can be a little overwhelming, particularly if you are interested in visiting the Iberian nation's beaches, which are often said to be some of the most beautiful in the world. 

    The Algarve, the southern region most often visited for R&R, alone has over 150 beaches. Once you add the many wild and hidden beaches dotted in the Alentejo region, the Azore islands, Madeira, and the North, you might feel dizzy.

    At least that's how I felt when I sat down this August to plan a six-day beach road trip.

    I was far from the only one trying to do the same. Last year, the number of tourists visiting Portugal rose a whopping 12% for a record 12.7 million people. This year looks to be no different with preliminary figures suggesting that the number of American tourists visiting the country has jumped 27% in 2018, after an increase of 35% last year.

    In August, Portugal was recognized as the hottest travel destination of 2018 by Virtuoso Travel, a luxury travel network that runs one of the biggest tradeshows in the travel industry.

    That all left me a bit nervous, particularly when a taxi driver in Lisbon warned me that Algarve beaches in August are so packed beachgoers look like the tasty tins of sardines Portuguese snack on. 

    Instead of following the mind-numbing number of travel guides purporting to know Portugal's best beaches, I decided to ask regular Portuguese people that I met where they would go. Their recommendations — from shop-owners, taxi drivers, bed & breakfast managers, and bartenders — proved to be magical.

    I ended up with a road trip I will never forget. Here's what it was like:

    SEE ALSO: I visited the Portuguese castle called 'Disneyland for adults,' and it's a magical, real-life fairy-tale setting you can't miss

    DON'T MISS: I ate at the most beautiful McDonald's in the world, with crystal chandeliers, stained glass windows, and outrageously delicious pastries

    I started the road trip up north in Serra da Estrela, the highest mountain range in Portugal and a stark contrast from the beachy south.

    Serra Da Estrela



    Portugal isn't a big country, but the drive south to Alvor was slightly over five hours. If I had been driving from Lisbon, it would have been about two and a half hours.



    But the longer drive gave me a view into regions of Portugal that most tourists skip, like the golden plains of Alentejo. The region covers about one-third of the country. While it also has beaches, the interior is marked by vast fields of wheat and cork trees that ripple in the afternoon breeze.

    Alentejo Region



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    michaels 2227

    • Hobby Lobby& Michaels sell arts-and-crafts products like canvases and paint, sketchbooks, scrapbooking supplies, and home decor. The two stores also offer craft classes for kids and adults, as well as DIY project ideas and tips.
    • Hobby Lobby is a privately owned company, but earlier this year, it announced it would be continuing to grow, opening an additional 60 stores and hiring around 2,500 new employees in 2018. 
    • In August, Michaels reported comparable sales decreased 0.4% in the second quarter. The company opened nine new stores, closed one store, and relocated seven stores in the quarter.
    • We visited neighboring locations of the two retailers in Commack, New York, and found that we preferred the shopping experience at Michaels. 

     

    Hobby Lobby & Michaels are two of the biggest arts-and-crafts giants in the United States.

    Both stores sell products like canvases and paint, sketchbooks, scrapbooking supplies, and home decor. The two stores also offer craft classes for kids and adults, as well as DIY project ideas and tips.

    Hobby Lobby, which is privately owned, currently operates 800 stores across 47 states. In 2017, it opened 63 new stores, including 12 relocated stores. Earlier this year, Hobby Lobby announced it would be continuing to grow, opening an additional 60 stores and hiring around 2,500 new employees in 2018. 

    Michaels, which is a public company, currently has 1,251 of its namesake stores in 49 statesIn August, Michaels reported comparable sales decreased 0.4% in the second quarter. The company opened nine new stores, closed one store, and relocated seven stores in the quarter.

    We visited the two stores at neighboring locations in Commack, New York, and found that there was a clear winner between the two. Here's the verdict: 

    SEE ALSO: Gap is struggling to keep up with its sister brands — we visited the store and saw why

    The first stop was Hobby Lobby.



    The inside was fully decorated for fall. There were deals on all sorts of fall decor ...



    ... and Halloween decor was slowly being added to the shelves.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    janet jackson justin timberlake nipplegate

    • CBS boss Les Moonves sought to undermine Janet Jackson's career after the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" incident at the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show, according to a HuffPost report. 
    • Multiple sources told HuffPost that Moonves considered Jackson "not sufficiently repentant" for the incident and subsequently banned her music from MTV, VH1, and other Viacom-owned properties. 
    • Moonves is reportedly in settlement talks to leave CBS, with the board offering around $100 million amid an investigation into sexual misconduct allegations against him.

    Les Moonves, the embattled CEO of CBS, reportedly sought to ban Janet Jackson from MTV and Viacom-owned properties, and undermine her career, after the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" incident that took place at the 2004 Super Bowl halftime show, according to HuffPost report.

    Multiple unnamed sources told HuffPost that Moonves considered Jackson "not sufficiently repentant" for the incident, in which Justin Timberlake ripped away a piece of Jackson's leather outfit during the halftime show and left her breast exposed for "9/16 of a second" on live TV. 

    CBS and the halftime show's producer, MTV, which were both under the parent company Viacom at the time, faced criticism and a $550,000 fine from the Federal Communications Commission. Moonves said in a statement following the incident that CBS was "angry and embarrassed" by the malfunction. 

    Though Timberlake and Jackson both said at the time that the incident was a true malfunction, Moonves banned both artists from appearing on the 2004 Grammy Awards broadcast by CBS.

    According to HuffPost's sources, Timberlake "tearfully apologized" for the incident and was allowed to perform at the Grammys, but Moonves was "furious that Jackson didn't make a similarly contrite apology to him," and subsequently sought to further undercut her career. 

    Moonves reportedly ordered a ban on Jackson's music on MTV, VH1, and other Viacom-owned properties, which adversely affected the sales of Jackson's March 2004 album "Damita Jo."

    HuffPost's sources said that they felt that Moonves "played a large part" in how the public perceived Jackson in the aftermath of an event that significantly damaged her career.

    Seven years after the incident, Moonves was reportedly "furious" and "aggressive" in tone to several sources after Jackson signed a book deal with Simon & Schuster (which is owned by Viacom) for her 2011 memoir "True You."

    Moonves is reportedly in settlement talks to leave CBS, with the board offering around $100 million amid an investigation into sexual misconduct allegations against him, which appeared in a New Yorker report in July. NBC News also reported that Shari Redstone, the controlling shareholder of both CBS and Viacom, has been seeking a possible replacement for Moonves.

    CBS declined to comment on HuffPost's report. Representatives for CBS also declined to comment to Business Insider, and Jackson's reps did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

    SEE ALSO: The CBS board is reportedly negotiating a $100 million exit for CEO Les Moonves as the investigation into sexual-misconduct claims against him continues

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    Gary Cohn and Steven Mnuchin

    • Then President-elect Donald Trump offered the job of Treasury secretary to Gary Cohn during a transition-period meeting at Trump Tower.
    • "I hired the wrong guy for treasury secretary," Trump said according to veteran journalist Bob Woodward's new book, "Fear: Trump in the White House."
    • Steven Mnuchin, who Trump had already privately tapped to be treasury secretary, was in the meeting.
    • The news of Mnuchin's selection leaked while Cohn was still in Trump Tower.

    According to veteran journalist Bob Woodward's explosive new book, "Fear: Trump in the White House," Gary Cohn rejected President-elect Donald Trump's suggestions that he become Secretary of Energy or Director of the Office of Management and Budget during a transition meeting at Trump Tower.

    So Trump suggested another job.

    "You know what?" Trump said. "I hired the wrong guy for Treasury secretary. You should be Treasury secretary. You would be the best Treasury secretary."

    There were a couple problems with Trump's suggestion: The president-elect had already tapped Steven Mnuchin to be treasury secretary.

    Also, Mnuchin was in the room.

    Business Insider obtained a copy of the book, which is being published by Simon & Schuster and is set for release on Tuesday. Woodward wrote that Mnuchin did not say anything or react to Trump's suggestion. But a few minutes after the meeting, news of Mnuchin's selection leaked to the media.

    Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law who was still with Cohn in Trump Tower, suggested Mnuchin leaked the news to head off any switch by Trump.

    "That's crazy," Kushner said, according to Woodward. "Mnuchin just put that out. You freaked him out so badly in the meeting."

    Trump met with Cohn at Trump Tower on November 29, 2016, the same day The New York Times reported Mnuchin would be tapped as Treasury secretary.

    Cohn eventually became the director of the National Economic Council, a top economic adviser to the president. Mnuchin is still serving as Treasury secretary, and he has emerged as a key ally in Trump's Cabinet. Cohn departed the White House in March amid disagreements with Trump on trade policy.

    Woodward's book details the supposed chaos and dysfunction in the White House, much of which he portrays as being caused by Trump. Another story about Cohn details the then-economic adviser stealing documents off the president's desk to prevent Trump from pulling the US out of major trade deals. 

    The White House has attacked the contents of "Fear," calling Woodward's book "nothing more than fabricated stories."

    The Treasury Department referred requests for comment to the White House. A spokesperson for the White House did not respond to a request for comment.

    Here are more revelations from the book so far:

    SEE ALSO: Gary Cohn reportedly snatched documents off Trump's desk to prevent him from wrecking 2 massive trade deals

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    Burning Man 2018

    For nine days, Black Rock City, Nevada, is overtaken by 70,000 people to become Burning Man, one of the wildest art events in the world.

    This was the event's 33rd year on the desert playa, and it included hundreds of art installations, musical acts, and workshops. This year's theme was "I, Robot," named for Isaac Asimov's science-fiction novel — and much of the artwork reflected a computerized aesthetic.

    Here's what it was like:

    SEE ALSO: 22 female angel investors every startup founder should know

    Burning Man takes place each year at the end of the summer. Up to 70,000 people gather from all over the world to become temporary residents of Black Rock City, Nevada.



    The temperature in the desert can reach up to 100 degrees, and shade is scarce.



    On the first day of the event, a windstorm swept the playa.



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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    Former President Barack Obama criticized President Donald Trump's treatment of the media during a speech on Friday.

    • Former President Barack Obama compared his treatment of the media to his successor's, calling President Donald Trump out for labeling the press the "enemy of the people."
    • Obama conceded that he was critical of media he believed treated him unfairly during his presidency, but, he argued, he never attempted to silence their voices. 
    • "I complained plenty about Fox News, but you never heard me threaten to shut them down, or call them 'enemies of the people,'" the former president said during a rare speech on Friday. 

    Former President Barack Obama compared his treatment of the media to his successor's, arguing during a Friday speech that while he griped "plenty" about conservative media during his time in the White House, he never advocated for their silencing.

    Obama suggested that the current president's penchant for slamming media critical of him as "fake news" and the "enemy of the people" is un-democratic and un-American.

    "It shouldn't be Democratic or Republican to say that we don't threaten the freedom of the press because they say things or publish stories we don't like," Obama said during a speech at the University of Illinois, where he received an ethics in government award. "I complained plenty about Fox News, but you never heard me threaten to shut them down, or call them 'enemies of the people.'"

    Political scientists and historians regularly call President Donald Trump's media bashing characteristic of authoritarian leaders, who often work to discredit the fourth estate. Republican politicians have long framed the media as the "opposition party" and worked to turn their voters against the press, but many argue Trump has taken this tactic to new heights. 

    "'The FAKE NEWS media is not my enemy. It is the enemy of the American people," Trump tweeted a month after taking office last year. 

    Meanwhile, Trump regularly praises his favorite network, Fox News, and has limited the vast majority of his media appearances to interviews with the right-leaning outlet's anchors. 

    Fox was on the receiving end of some presidential criticism during the Obama administration. In 2009, the Obama White House claimed that Fox was "not a news organization" and instead "a wing of the Republican Party."

    Many journalists, including those at competing networks, pushed back on the Obama administration's public lashing of Fox, asserting that it is not the president's place to determine what news organizations are — or are not — legitimate. 

    Obama's Friday speech kicked off his move back into the political fray— the former president is planning campaign events with candidates in California, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Illinois this month, as this year's midterm elections heat up.

    SEE ALSO: Obama is about to jump back into campaign mode

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    trump obama

    • Former President Barack Obama chided Republicans for taking credit for job growth numbers that look similar to the figures during his presidency.
    • "So when you hear how the economy is doing right now, let's just remember when this recovery started," Obama said.
    • According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, job growth during President Donald Trump's first year in office was lower than any of the previous three years under Obama.

    President Barack Obama thinks Republicans may be taking a bit too much credit for the strength of the US economy.

    During a speech at the University of Illinois, Obama chided Republicans taking credit for the current strength of the economy when they previously derided similar figures when he was in office.

    "So when you hear how the economy is doing right now, let's just remember when this recovery started," Obama said. "I'm glad it's continued, but when you hear about this 'economic miracle' that's been going on when the job numbers come out — monthly job numbers — suddenly Republicans are saying it's a miracle. I have to kind of remind them those job numbers are the same as they were in 2015 and 2016."

    Since President Donald Trump took office, the administration and many congressional Republicans have argued that the economy's growth has stemmed from deregulatory policies and tax cuts enacted by the party. Republicans have cheered economic data almost identical to the numbers under Obama.

    On the other hand, many Democrats and economists contend that the economic growth and strengthening labor market are a continuation of the strong and steady rebound since the end of the recession.

    Here's the breakdown, per the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

    • 2014 (Obama): 258,250 jobs added monthly on average; 3,099,000 annual total
    • 2015 (Obama): 221,417 jobs added monthly on average; 2,657,000 annual total
    • 2016 (Obama): 176,333 jobs added monthly on average; 2,116,000 annual total
    • 2017 (Trump): 170,500 jobs added monthly on average; 2,046,000 annual total
    • 2018 (Trump): on pace for 208,000 jobs added monthly on average; 2,496,000 annual total

    The tax cuts and massive fiscal stimulus enacted under Trump are just beginning to filter into the broader economy, but so too are the effects from Trump's intensifying trade battles.

    SEE ALSO: Trump threatens tariffs on another $267 billion worth of Chinese goods

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    Kerri Evelyn Harris, a Democrat who challenged Sen. Tom Carper in the state's primary on Thursday, hugs a supporter.

    • On a summer Thursday, with temperatures hovering in the 90s, more people voted in Delaware's primary elections than ever before in the state's history. 
    • Far exceeding turnout expectations, nearly 54,000 Democrats voted for Sen. Tom Carper, while 29,000 voted for his more progressive challenger, Kerri Evelyn Harris.

    On Thursday, three-term incumbent Sen. Tom Carper, a Delaware Democrat, faced his first serious primary challenge.

    The race in the small blue state received significant national media attention as Carper's challenger, community organizer Kerri Evelyn Harris, hoped to become the next progressive insurgent to topple an establishment Democrat in this year's primaries. 

    Voter enthusiasm ran high on Thursday — but not just for the insurgent.

    In his 30-point victory over Harris, the popular centrist senator brought out nearly 54,000 voters, while Harris won about 29,000. Harris's campaign thought Carper could be defeated if Harris managed to win 26,000 votes, but voter turnout crushed all of the campaign's expectations. 

    On a summer weekday, with temperatures hovering in the 90s, more Delawareans voted in the state's primary elections than ever before in the state's history. 

    The total number of Democratic voters — just over 83,000 — was just 10,000 votes short of those cast in the 2016 presidential primary.

    Meanwhile, Republican turnout went from nearly 70,000 voters in the 2016 primary to just under 38,000 on Thursday. 

    Both candidates worked hard to increase voter turnout. While Harris focused on reaching new voters, young people, and people of color, Carper hit the road in his minivan.

    Carper said on election day that Delaware Democrats are more engaged than ever in politics, but that they're not looking for an insurgent to take on the current administration, but instead a principled politician willing to compromise with the GOP.

    "Delaware's almost schizophrenic, and I think the country is too. They want us to stop Trump from doing more stupid and, in some cases, cruel things, at the same time they want us to try to find common ground on a number of other issues," the senator told CNN on Thursday. "And I think you can do both. I think you can do both."

    SEE ALSO: Democrats are looking to Delaware for the next Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez-style insurgent upset

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